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STATE OF MARYLAND 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



NINETIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



Of The 

State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 
Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 

Year Ending June 30, 1956 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



.0 



i 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



NINETIETH ANNUAL REPORT 

Of The 

State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 

Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 

Year Ending June 30, 1956 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



MARYLAND DIRECTORY 
OF 

SCHOOL 0FFICL4LS, OCTOBER 1955 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Name Address Term Expires 

Wendell D. Allen, President Baiiimore 1956 

Jerome Framptom, Jr.. Vice-president Federalsburg 1957 

William A. Gunter Cumberland 1960 

Dwight O. W. Holmes Baltimore 1958 

Mrs. Richard Marcus Pikesville 1959 

Mrs. Curtis Walker Chevy Chase 1955 

Vacancy 1961 

Thomas G. PuUen, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer 

MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 
THOMAS G. PULLEN, JR. 
State Superintendent of Schools 
Name Office 

John J. Seidel Assistant State Superintendent 

David W. Zimmerman Assistant State Superintendent 

James E. Spitznas Director of Instruction 

Merle S. Bateman Director of Certification and Accreditation 

Helen M. Clark Director of Library Extension 

William S. Sartorius Director of Administration and Finance 

R. C. Thompson Director of Vocational Rehabilitation 

E. Drusilla Chairs Stenographer-Secretary 

Dorothy E. Young Stenographer-Secretary 

Division of Instruction — James E. Spitznas, Director 

George M. Crawford Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Gladys T. Hopkins Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Grace A. Dorsey Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Paul E. Huffington Supervisor of High Schools 

Willis H. White Supervisor of High Schools 

Herbert R. Steiner Supervisor of Physical Education 

Dorothy W. Shires Supervisor of Pupil Personnel and Parent Education 

Mrs. Geneva E. Flickinger Supervisor of Special Education 

Ethel E. Sammis Assistant Supervisor of Phyp'cal Education 

Beverly J. Sheain Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Beverly Armiger , Senior Stenographer 

Mildred M. Faulstich Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Constance Fish Senior Stenographer 

Sue E. Stimely (part time) Senior Stenographer 

Callista J, Boyd Senior Typist 

Division of Vocational Education — 

John J. Seidel, Assistant Superintendent 

Harry M. McDonald Supervisor of Agriculture 

Dwight P. Jacobus Supervisor of Educational Services to Industry 

Evelyn F. Miller Supervisor of Home Economics 

Herschel M. James Supervisor of Industrial Education 

Eleanor G. Weagly Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Joseph S. Endslow Assistant Supervisor of Veterans On-the-Farm Training Program 

George A. Myers Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Frank H. Nachman Counselor for Veterans On-the-Job Training Program 

Elizabeth McGinnity Stenographer-Secretiry 

Mrs. Florence B. Ackerman Senior Stenographer 

Lillian O. Erpenslein Senior Stenographer 

Bessie I. Rones Senior Stenographer 

Sue E. Stimely (part-timr) Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Haze! B. Wilkerson Senior Stenographer 

Florence M. Brady Junior Clerk 

Division of Certification and Accreditation — Merle S. Bateman, Director 

W. Theodore Boston Assistant Director 

M. Eleanor Rice Supervisor of Certification 

Helen L. Widmyer Supervisor of Accreditation 

James L. Reid Supervisor of School Plant Planning 

•F. J. Thuman Consultant Architect 

C. William Anthony Supervisor of Teacher Education 

• Part time 



2 



Name Oflfice 

Ruth E. Hobbs Assistant Supervisor of Equivalence Examinations 

Charles C. Conlon Assistant Supervisor of Trade Schools 

Richard K. McKay Assistant Supervisor of Trade Schools 

Mrs. Grace Steele Travers Counselor 

Helen Ellis Stenographer-Secretary 

Elsie F. Forman Stenographer-Secretary 

Alice Algie Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Margaret Bray Senior Stenographer 

Angela M. O'Neill Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Bessie S. Price Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Gertrude A. Gorrell Senior Clerk 

Lee F. Kolman Senior Clerk 

Augusta Schoberg Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Doris C. Van Cleaf Senior Clerk 

Division of Library Extension — Helen M. Clark, Director 

4U0 Cathedral Street, Baltimore 1 

Mae Graham Supervisor of School and Children's Libraries 

Nettie B. Taylor Supervisor of County and Institutional Libraries 

Eleanor Hocker Readers' Counselor 

Karry E. Foster Technical Counselor 

M. E. Naomi Johnson Associate Librarian 

Josephine Baldwin Assistant Librarian 

Mrs. Suzanne Pearce Assistant Librarian 

Mrs. Beverly B. Green Library Assistant 

Doris L. Anderson Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Johann Nizer Armiger Senior Stenographer 

Martha Keydash Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Regina H. Murray Senior Typist 

Marlyn L. Masson Junior Typist 

Aydelotte L. Meister Junior Clerk 

Louis Myers Porter 

Division of Administration and Finance — William S. Sartorius, Director 

William L. Bart 11 Supervisor of Finance 

R. Christine Hogan Supervisor of Research 

Harold D. Reese Supervisor of Teachers Colleges Business Management 

Charles V. Akeley Assistant Supervisor in Finance 

Mrs. Anne K. Carroll Assistant Supervisor in Research 

Helen D. George Editor 

Bernard G. Geyer Auditor 

Margaret E. Albaugh Administrative Assistant 

Mrs. Genevieve Nekervis Statistician I 

Mrs. Verda McClow Statistician II 

Mrs. Mary McN. Faupel Statistician II 

Mrs. Mary E. Hoover Principal Account Clerk I 

Phyllis E. Rodgers Principal Account Clerk II 

Margaret F. Flahavan Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Laura Gaither.. Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Mary B. Prince Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Claire S. Anderson Stenographer-Secretary 

Carrye Hamburger Stenographer-Secretary 

Dorothy J. Walterhoefer Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Corinne D. Combs Report T>'pist 

Mrs. Virginia K. Goldsmith Statistical Clerk 

Mrs. Margaret P. Rappe Senior Typist 

Ellen P. Christmas Senior Typist 

Mrs. Margaret J. Meister Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Marie Wollschlager Key Punch Operator 

Mrs. Wilda R. Taylor Telephone Operator 

Lloyd E. Holmes Office Appliance Operator 

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation — R. C. Thompson, Director 

STATE OFFICE 

Lionel Burgess Supervisor of Case Services 

W. Bird Terwilliger Supervisor of Guidance Training and Placement 

George W. Keller Assistant Supervisor of Services for the Blind 

*Dean W. Roberts, M.D Medical Consultant 

Myrtle E. Chell Special Counselor for the Tuberculous 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Swisher Special Counselor for the Tuberculous 

John T. Goembel Craft Specialist 

Kathleen E. Scheve Stenographer-Secretary 

Anne Nusinov Principal Stenographer 

Charlotte A. Sylvester Principal Stenographer 

T. Janet Kammar Senior Stenographer 

Doris P. Nolan Senior Stenographer 

* Part time 



3 



METROPOLITAN BALTIMORE OFFICE 
2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 
Name Office 

Thomas D. Braun Supervisor 

J. Leo Delaney Assistant Supervisor 

Ernest C. Allnutt, Jr Counselor 

James S. Dashiell Counselor 

Martha R. Harrison Counselor 

Harold B. Hayes Counselor 

Bernard E. Kelly Counselor 

William W. Lamprell Counselor 

Irwin D. Medinger Counselor 

William B. Melville Counselor 

Ruth F. Ring Counselor 

James D. Smyth Counselor 

Carroll L. Speck Counselor 

M. Eugene Spurrier Counselor 

Emma Lueckert Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Ruth Friedland Senior Stenographer 

Janes E. Gallagher Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Rose S. Gentry Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Helen M. Gordon Senior Stenographer 

Helen L. Jeffrey Senior Stenographer 

June F. Roemer Senior Stenographer 

Bell Sklar Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Olive M. Mayo Receptionist 

EASTERN SHORE DISTRICT 
117 Calvert Building, Salisbury 

Raymond H. Simmons Assistant Supervisor 

Robert L. Burton Counselor 

Frank A. Tarbutton Counselor, Board of Education, Chestertown 

Mrs. Anne E. Bishop Senior Stenographer 

SOUTHERN MARYLAND DISTRICT 
4313 Hamilton Street, Hyattsville 

Merl D. Myers Assistant Supervisor 

Leslie B. Cole Counselor 

Fedon G. Nides Counselor 

Carroll Walsh Counselor, Board of Education, Rockville 

Mrs. Frances G. Smith Senior Stenographer 

WESTERN MARYLAND DISTRICT 
122 West Washington Street, Hagerstown 

H. Dorsey Devlin Assistant Supervisor 

John M. Cobun Counselor, 111 Union Street, Cumberland 

William C. Hill Counselor, 115 E. Church Street, Frederick 

Mrs. Alfred E. Coffman Senior Stenographer 

DISABILITY DETERMINATIONS PROGRAM 

(Old Age and Survivors' Insurance) 

10 East Fayette Street, Baltimore 2 

Foy L. Lunsford Counselor in Charge 

Minnie Gerber Junior Counselor 

Mrs. Martha C. Trate.... Junior Counselor 

F. dePaul Whitehurst Junior Counselor 

*S. J. Venable, M.D Medical Consultant 

Gloria M. Godsey Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Suzanne Ness Senior Stenographer 

MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND OFFICE STAFF 
31 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Hooper S. Miles, Chairman State Treasurer 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Vic^-chairman State Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary S. Ellis Principal, North Salisbury Elementary School, Wicomico County 

J. Millard Tawes State Comptroller 

Willis H. White State Supervisor of High Schools 

John P. Mannion Director 

C. G. Christis Accountant 

Minnie M. Hamilton Administrative Assistant IT 

Dorothy Bitterman Atlee Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Audrey Heere Accounting Machine Operator 

Mrs. Aneta Richardson Accounting Machine Operator 

Grace R. Perry Senior Typist 

Edna M. Doyle Senior Clerk 

• Part time 

4 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND 

County Library Librarian 

Allegany Cumberland Free Public Library Mary G. Walsh 

LaVale Public Library Mrs. Milton Granet 

Westernport Public Library Mrs. Elizabeth Thomas 

Frostburg Public Library Miss Thelma McKay 

Anne Ai-undel . . .Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Library, 

Annapolis Esther King 

Kuethe Library, Glen Burnie Helen Zeman 

Baltimore City... Enoch Pratt Free Library Amy Winslow 

Baltimore Baltimore County Library, Towson Richard Minnich 

Caroline Denton Public Library Mrs. G. Daniel Grouse 

Federaisburg Community Library Mrs. Jack Christopher 

Ridgely Community Library Mrs. Paul Hoffman 

Carroll Davis Library, Westminster Mrs. Helen Rex Shroyer 

Cecil Cecil County Library, Elkton Mrs. Dorothy W. Jefferson 

Cecilton Community Library Mrs. Alfred L. Pierce 

Charles Charles County Library, La Plata Doris Holmes 

Dorchester Dorchester County Public Library, 

Cambridge Mrs. Margaret Henry 

Hurlock Free Public Library Mrs. Floyd N. Harper 

Vienna Public Library Mrs. Alan Webb 

Frederick C. Burr Artz Library, Frederick Josephine Etchison 

Emmitsburg Public Library Louise Sebold 

Thurmont Public Library Mi's. Ernest Hammaker 

Garrett Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County, 

Oakland Edith Brock 

Harford Harford County Library, Bel Air Mrs. Dorothy Glackin 

Harve de Grace Public Library Mrs. Roswell Poplar 

Howard Howard County Library, Ellicott City Mrs. Lenna Burgess 

Kent Chestertown Public Library Cornelia Davis 

Montgomery ....Montgomery County Department of Public 

Libraries, Gaithersburg George B. Moreland 

Pockville Public Library Mrs. Rose C. Miller 

Takoma Park Public Library Mrs. Ruth B. Pratt 

Prince George's .. Prince George's County Memorial Library, 

Hyattsville Mrs. Mary Kenan Hadley 

Greenbelt Public Library Mrs. Marjorie A. Muir 

Queen Anne's .... Queen Anne's County Library, Centreville. . . . Mrs. Elizabeth H. Baker 

St. Mary's St. Mary's County Memorial Library, 

Leonardtown Gladys Long, Acting 

Somerset Corbin Memorial Library, Crisfield Mrs. Gladys Daugherty 

Princess Anne Public Library Mrs. S. Russell Bozman 

Vaughn Hoffman Memorial Library, 

Rhodes Point Mrs. Doris Spriggs 

Talbot Talbot County Free Library, Easton Mrs. David S. Stewart 

Washington Washington County Free Library, 

Hagerstown Mrs. Mary Louise Holzafel 

Wicomico Wicomico County Free Library, Salisbury .... Mrs. Fred Horsley, Jr. 

Worcester Berlin Public Library Mary Bailey 

Poeomoke City Public Library Mrs. Byron H. Ollendike 

Sr.-)W Hill Public Library Mrs. Paul C. Kenney 

PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

Earle T. Hawkins Towson William E. Henry Bowie 

R. Bowen Hardesty Frostburg Miles W. Connor Coppin, Baltimore-17 

Wilbur Devilbiss Salisbury 

COUNTY ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY STAFFS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY 
Cumberland 

Name Office 

Ralph R. Webster Superintendent of Schools 

Richard T. Rizer Superviser of Secondary Education and Assistant Superintendent 

Lewyn C. Davis Supervisor of .Junior High Schools 

Arthur G. Ramey Supervisor of Transportation 

Jane E. Botsford Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Winifred Greene Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mildred E. Willison Supervisor of Elementary Education 

M. Jean Camper Supervisor of Special Education 

W. Valgene Routch Supervisor of Music Education 

Julius D. Lonnholm Supervisor of Vocational, Industrial, and Adult Education 

Theodore P. Foote Supervisor of Art Education 

Ruth C. McColly Supervisor of Home Economics 

Joseph T. Downey Supervisor of Maintenance 

Gladys Miller Eaton Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Homer S. Higgins Supervisor of Punil Personnel 

Esther M. Carter Visiting Teacher 

Frederick H. Sheeley Visiting Teacher 

Elizabeth Dixon Pitcher Financial Secretary and Office Manager 

Maybelle V. Nine Secretary to Superintendent 



5 



Name 



Office 



ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 
Annapolis 

David S. Jenkins Superintendent of Schools 

Fred L. Alexander Administrative Assistant 

R. Harold McCann Assistant Superintendent, Administrative 

Howard A. Kinhart Assistant Superintendent, Sr. High Schools 

Ruth V. Dudderar Assistant Superintendent, Elem. and Jr. High Schools 

Richard D. Carlson Supervisor of Planning 

Mrs. Madolyn R. Powers Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Dennis W. Turner Supervisor of Maintenance 

Frank G. Baker, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 

Leonard Johnson Supervisor of Custodial Services 

Leviah Daniel Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Sarah V. Jones Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia D. Moore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Ruby G. Myers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Reed Su-->ervisor of Elementary Schools 

H. Elizabeth Slater Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Richard R. Clopper Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Katherine Kibler Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Robert S. Shaffner Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Doris M. Clements Supervisor of Home Economics 

Frank C. Gunderloy Supervisor of Vocational and Technical Education 

Margaret Adams Supervisor of Music 

William J. Call?-ghan Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mrs. Ellen T. Elliott Supervisor of Personnel Procurement 

Mrs. Eleanor B. Waring Director of Personnel 

Mary E. Moss Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Ruth P. Eason Supervisor of Special Education 

Ernest C. Young School Psychologist 

Mrs. Flora Andrews Visiting Teacher 

John J. Avril Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Louise M. Beadle Visiting Teacher 

Alice Gilbert Visiting Teacher 

B. Lewis Langdon Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Ruth J. McNelly Supervisor of Finance and Certification 

Mrs. Alice Torovsky Secretary to the Superintendent 



BALTIMORE COUNTY 
Tcwson 

Edward G. Stapleton Superintendent of Schools 

James A. Sensenbaugh Assistant Superintendent in Administration 

James B. O'Toole, Jr Assistant Superintendent in Instruction 

G. Alfred Helwig Director of C'Triculum 

Helen C. Huttenhauer Assistant in Publications 

Karl V. Sloop (Office: Towson Sr. High School) Assistant in Audio- Visual Aids 

B. Melvin Cole Director of Elementary Education 

M. Katherine Dost Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Clotilde C. Drechsler Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Myrtle S. Eckhardt Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Jennie E. Jessop Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hilda Kestner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Anna G. Shepperd Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Pauline J. Hobbs Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Homer O. Elseroad Director of Secondary Education 

Mrs. Wylda F. Benson Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Robert W. Gilford Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Samuel E. Herman Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Stella H. Johnston Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Louella H. Woodward Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Helen E. Hale Supervisor of High Schools 

Joseph B. Hillyard Supervisor of High Schools 

Jean C. Sisk Supervisor of High Schools 

♦Minnie H. Woolford Supervisor of High Schools 

Olive T. Jobes Supervisor of Art 

Harold S. Martin Supervisor of Physical Education 

John W. Craft Supervisor of Music 

Thomas R. Lawrence Supervisor of Music 

Thomas M. Greene Supervisor of Business and Adult Education 

Mary E. Kelleher Supervisor of Home Economics 

Arthur A. Dick Supervisor of Vocational Education and Industrial Arts 

Elizabeth D. Hodges Supervisor of Library Service 

Anna R. Meeks Supervisor of Guidance 

Ralph E. Kessler Supervisor of Special Education 

N. Harry Camp, Jr Director of Clinical Services 

Jack C. Becker Psychologist 

Curtis A. Gilgash Psychologist 

Marion H. Pelton Psychologist 

Raymond B. Teixeira Psychologist 



Part time 







Name 



Office 



BALTIMORE COUNTY (Cont'd) 

♦Mrs. Fay Young Psychologist 

Herman C. Burton Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Eliza C. Merritt Visiting Teacher 

David H. Black (Office: Catonsville, RIdgeway 7-4109) Visiting Teacher 

Susan Summers (Office: Catonsville, Ridgeway 7-4109) Visiting Teacher 

Mildred E. Jones (Office: Pikesville, HUnter 6-7880) Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. irma R. Kell (Office: Rosedale, MUrdock 6-6493) Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Vivian S. Mcintosh (Office: Rosedale, MUrdock 6-6493) Visiting Teacher 

Frederick R. Keyton (Office: Rosedale, MUrdock 6-6493) Visiting Teacher 

Mary J. Stoll (Office: Rosedale. MUrdock 6-6493) Visiting Teacher 

Rolland Viti (Office: Rosedale, MUrdock 6-6493) Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Kathryn B. Stonesifer Visicing Teacher 

John B. Hart Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Eliza S. McDaniel Visiting Teacher 

I. Louise Ward Supervisor of Nursing Service 

Mrs. Margaret S. Farlow Personnel and Credentials Secretary 

Ruthetta Lippy Supervisor of School Lunch Service 

Mrs. Adele D. Tomey Assistant in School Lunch Service 

Walter M. Gordon Supervisor of Transportation 

C. Thomas Dunnock Assistant in Transportation 

Karl F. Swem Assistant in Transportation 

Maynard B. Keadle Assistant in Transportation 

Preston L. Grimm Assistant in Statistics and Research 

Kenneth C. Towle Assistant in Statistics and Research 

William T. Willis, Jr Assistant Superintendent in Business Operations 

Leon E. Grant Assistant in Purchasing 

William C. Feader Supervisor of Accounting 

Morris R. Baker Engineer in Charge of Construction, Operation and Maintenance 

Herd S. Eburg Supervisor of Plant Maintenance 

Herbert G. Otter Assistant in Plant Maintenance 

Ian Gordon Supervisor of Plant Operation 

H. Erich Koch Assistant in Plant Operation 

Calvin A. Kobsa Assistant in Plant Construction 

Dale E. Lloyd Landscape Architect 

Thomas S. Bowyer Assistant in Grounds Maintenance 

Mrs. Evelyn C. Norton Secretary to Superintendent, Head Bookkeeper for General 

Budget and Special Accounts 

CALVERT COUNTY 
Prince Frederick 

Maurice A. Dunkle Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mildred Finlon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Thehna M. Cornish Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Herman A. Hauver Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Lola M. Parks Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Lloyd J. Falk Supervisor of Maintenance 

E. Anne Yoe Secretary 

CAROLINE COUNTY 
Denton 

W. Stewart Fitzgerald Superintendent of Schools 

Fred G. Usilton Supervisor of High Schools 

Beatrice Williams Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

♦Mrs. Lula D. Ward Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

James P. Hill Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Bertha L. Miller Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Barbara J. Bacsak Stenographer 

CARROLL COUNTY 
Westminster 

Samuel M. Jenness Superintendent of Schools 

John F. Wooden, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Gerald E. Richter Supervisor of High Schools 

Ruth E. Devore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Charles E. Reck Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Josephine West Supervisor of Home Economics and Cafeterias 

♦Philip S. Royer Supervisor of Music 

♦Mae Prince Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Maud Manahan Supervisor of School Nurses 

Maye E. Grimes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Evelyn Maus Visiting Teacher 

Stuart A. Widener Asst. in Building Operations and Transportation 

Roland F. Haifley Asst. in Custodial Service, School Lunch and Maintenance 

Mrs. Martha S. Gilbert Secretary to the Superintendent 

Curvin M. Seitz Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Ruby W. Shilling Stenographer and Secretary 



Part time 



7 



Name 



Office 



CECIL COUNTY 
Elkton 

Morris W. Rannels Superintendent of Schools 

E. B. Fockler Supervisor of High Schools 

William C. Graham Supervisor of High Schools 

Olive L. Reynolds Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred L. Sowers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rachel E. Boyd Supervisor of Home Economics 

Edwin H. Barnes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

James M. Renn Supervisor of Maintenance 

Mrs. Mary A. Grouse Visiting Teacher 

Willard W. Taylor Bookkeeper and Financial Secretary 

Dorothy J. Moore Secretary to Superintendent 

CHARLES COUNTY 
La Plata 

C. Paul Barnhart Superintendent of Schools 

Edward C. Turner Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Brown Supervisor of Colored High Schools 

Mrs. Christine Pearson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Joseph C. Parks Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Cecelia G- Farrall Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Georgia C. Lucas Visiting Teacher 

Margaret A. Posey Supervisor of School Lunch Program & Purchasing 

Mrs. Julia C. Totten Chief Bookkeeper & Secretary to Superintendent 

DORCHESTER COUNTY 
Cambridge 

James G. Busick Superintendent of Schools 

Albert S. Farver Supervisor of High Schools 

Evelyn E. Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Viola J. Comegys Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

John T. Comer, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

C. Jean Spedden Stenographer 

FREDERICK COUNTY 
Frederick 

Eugene W. Pruitt Superintendent of Schools 

Duval W. Sweadner Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn S. Davis Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Louise F. Thompson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Alice M. Love Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Charles E. Henson Supervisor of Colored Schools (part time) 

Warren R. Evans Supervisor of Health and Physical Education 

Paul E. Fogle Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Doris L. Dorsey Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Virginia D. Klos Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Paul L. Hoffmaster Supervisor of Transportation 

Lewis B. Eader Supervisor of Maintenance 

Ruth R. Trout Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Pauline J. Bowlus Secretary to Superintendent 

GARRETT COUNTY 
Oakland 

Willard L. Hawkins Superintendent of Schools 

Foster D. Bittle Supervisor of Sr.-Jr. High Schools 

Edwin W. Elias Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

*Mrs. Caroline Wilson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Oren T. Graser Supervisor of Maintenance 

John L. Fitzwater Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Margaret S. McComas Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Peggy L. Haines Secretary to Superintendent 

HARFORD COUNTY 
Bel Air 

Charles W. Willis Superintendent of Schools 

Benjamin S. Carroll Assistant Superintendent 

Allen B. Amoss Administrative Assistant 

Thomas Loughran Administrative Assistant 

Earle B. Wagner Administrative Assistant .5 time, Supervisor .5 time 

Howard B. Peters Director of Instruction 

C. Clark Jones High School Supervisor 

Thomas L. Smith High School Supervisor 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Rowe High School Supervisor 

Mrs. Anne M. Noonan Elementary Supervisor 

Hazel L. Fisher Elementary Supervisor 

Violet Davis Elementary Supervisor 

* On leave of absence 

8 



Name 



Office 



HARFORD COUNTY (Cont'd) 

James H. Clow, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles McCullough Visiting Teacher 

Estella Everett Visiting Teacher 

Ralph H. Morgan Building Engineer 

Dorothy Hill Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Alice W. Crowl Financial Secretary 

HOWARD COUNTY 
EUicott City 

John E. Yingling Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary R. Hovet Supervisor of High Schools 

Frank B. Durigg Supervisor of High Schools 

Carmen C. Delaplane Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Wilhelmina E. Oldfield Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Harry T. Murphy Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Gilbert E. Miller Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Irene M. Johnson Financial Secretary 

Dorothy C. Biller Secretary to Superintendent 

KENT COUNTY 
Chestertown 

Reade W. Corr Superintendent of Schools 

Carey E. Lacey Supervisor of High Schools 

Louise Hepbron Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

*Mrs. Sara B. Chambers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Madeline Fennell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Clara M. Chaires Chief Clerk and Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Harriett P. Goodman Secretary 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY 
Rockville 

Forbes H. Norris Superintendent of Schools 

James L. Prince Assistant Superintendent 

Thomas Pyle Assistant Superintendent 

Brian Benson Director of Finance 

Lester Welch Administrative Assistant to Superintendent 

Maude Arveson High School Supervisor 

Mrs. Helen P. Bready High School Supervisor 

Katherine B. Greaney High School Supervisor 

George L. Osterwise High School Supervisor 

Harold Packard High School Supervisor 

Mrs. Genevieve Blew High School Supervisor 

Ethel L. Benson Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Anne W. Caldwell Elementary Supervisor 

Etheleen Daniel Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Agnes M. Drewry Elementary Supervisor 

William B. Evans Elementary Supervisor 

Lillian L. Gore Elementary Supervisor 

Mary L. Grau....,- Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Ruth S. Cue Elementary Supervisor 

John M. King Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Lillian G. Klein Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Grace W. Kurtz Elementary Supervisor 

Elsie Schurter Elementary Supervisor 

Clara Stratemeyer Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Marjorie B. St. Clair Supervisor of Art 

Mrs. Louise Walker Supervisor of Audio- Visual Education 

Julia W. Watkins Supervisor of Home Arts 

William C. Feddeman Supervisor of Industrial and Adult Education 

Alice L. Robinson Supervisor of Libraries 

Charles Horn Supervisor of Music 

Cresent Bride Supervisor of Physical Education 

T. H. Owen Knight Supei-visor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Mirian T. Tannhauser Supervisor of Special Education 

James H. Sheldon Supervisor of Construction 

Otho H. Hawk Supervisor of Maintenance 

James L. Mullinix Supervisor of Maintenance 

Mrs. Corelli David Supervisor of School Lunch 

Richard Ream Supervisor of Transportation and Safety 

Helen M. Barnes Visiting Teacher 

Fred L. Dunn, Jr Visiting Teacher 

Jewel A. Green Visiting Teacher 

Robert C. Henley Visaing Teacher 

Weymouth Judkins V'siting Teacher 

Mrs. Edith Popenoe Visi^^ing Tescher 

Geraldine Reynolds Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Marjorie L. Van Dien Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Eileen Wilkinson Visiting Teacher 

* Part time 

9 



Name 



Office 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Mrs. Cecile Finley Psychologist 

Mrs. Ethel Savage Assistant to Psychologist 

Mrs. Margaret Johnston Assistant to Psychologist 

Mrs. Ruth Linn Psychiatric Social Worker 

Helen Collins Hearing Consultant 

Ann Dowd Speech Therapist 

Mrs. Florence Lowndes Speech Consultant 

Rozelle J. Miller Sight Consultant 

Mrs. Mary Mohler Remedial Reading Specialist 

Mrs. Anna Morgan Remedial Reading 

Mrs. Mary Reck Speech Correctionist 

Mrs. Bessie Rice Audiometrist 

Mrs. Mary C. Singles Home Instruction 

Leonard T. Oass Assistant Supervisor of Industrial and Adult Education 

Mrs. Jane Warren Assistant Supervisor of School Limch 

Donald E. Deyo Dean Montgomery Junior College 

Richard Grove Assistant Treasurer 

Frank Snyder Bookkeeper 

Chester J. Petranek Assistant Supervisor of Music 

Suzanna H. Schulenburg Elementary Art Consultant 

J. T. Wise Acting Supervisor of Custodial Services 

Douglas Hall Payroll Officer 

Maxw^ell E. Burdette Director of Research 

Sonley LeMay Assistant Director of Research 

Mrs. Julia C. Ardayne Supervisor and Director of Curriculum 

Mrs. Dorothy W. Dawfson Administrative Secretary 

Mrs. Mary G. Walters Secretary to Board of Education 

Mrs. Mildred Keys Secretary to Superintendent 

John A. Gallaher Audio-Visual Technician 

George Menke Director of Maintenance 

PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY 
Upper Marlboro 

William S. Schmidt Superintendent of Schools 

George H. Robinson Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

Thomas S. Gvv^ynn, Jr Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

Rowannetta S. Allen Director of Instruction 

Robert D. Binger Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Mrs. Helen H. Brashears Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Lucile L. Lurry Supervisor of Secondary Education 

W. Dean Manifold Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Emma M. Bovi^man Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Doswell E, Brooks Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Eunice E. Burdette Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Rita M. Donovan...., Supervision of Elementary Education 

William W. Hall Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Leila V. Hardesty Supervisor of Elementary Education 

A. Mildred Hoyle Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Elisabeth C. Kelly Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Elizabeth McMahon Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Margaret A. Beardsley Supervisor of Kindergartens 

Mrs. Jean D. Grams Supervisor of Adult Education 

Mrs. Mary Beth Wackwitz Supervisor of Art 

Mary A. Thompson Supervisor of Health Education 

M. Gladys Dickerson Supervisor of Home Economics 

Elmer K. Zeller Supervisor of Industrial and Vocational Education 

Mrs. Louise Bennett Supervisor of Libraries 

Mrs. Frances H. Lynch Supervisor of Music 

Vincent C. Holochwost Supervisor of Physical Education 

Ada M. Warrington Supervisor of Physical Education 

Victor Rice Psychological and Testincr Specialist 

Mrs. Martha Odell School Psychologist 

C. Elizabeth Rieg Supervisor of Special Services 

Mrs. Thelma Darling Home Teacher 

Mrs. Louise Hudgins Honie Teacher 

Marian E. Lobdell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

George Chsirlesworth Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elizabeth W. Hamilton VisHing Teacher 

Willie M. Henson Visiting Teacher 

Lillian L. Harvey Visiting Teacher 

M. Dorothy Jump Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Arlene A. Korn Visiting Teacher 

John R. Moyer Viait^'^fr Teacher 

Arthur E. Robinson Supervisor of Maintenance 

Armand Pisrontini Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Frnnklin B. Klnse Assistant Supervisor of Custodial Services 

William H. Smith Senior Building Inspector 

Alan Poole Junior Building Inspector 

Flora Srhroyer Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

John W. Heim Supervisor of Transportation 



10 



Name 



Office 



PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Russell O. Eckert Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Ruth Jefferson Assistant Treasurer 

Mrs. Helen S. Bowie Secretary to Superintendent 



Harry C. Rhodes 

Alberta C. Browne 

Mrs. Margaret S. Stack 

John H. Webb 

Mrs. Lola P. Brown 

Marie Shortall 

Mrs. Bette L. Smith 

Bonel P. Zakarian 



QUEEN ANNE'S COUNTY 
Centreville 



.... Superintendent of Schools 

Elementary Supervisor 

Supervisor 

Supervisor 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Financial Clerk 

Stenographer-Clerk 

Stenographer 



ST. MARY'S COUNTY 
Leonardtown 

Lettie M. Dent Superintendent of Schools 

E. Violette Young Supervisor of White Elementary Schools 

Ralph S. Waters Supervisor of Colored Schools 

Harriet H. Reeder Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Grace D. Cross Stenographer 

SOMERSET COUNTY 
Princess Anne 

C. Allen Carlson Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Alice Mae C. Beauchamp Supervisor of Elementary Education 

John L. Bond Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Kermit A. Cottman Supervisor of Elementary and Secondary Education 

Charles O. Burns, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Alva Bozman Parks Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Marian Tyler Colborn Stenographer-Typist 

TALBOT COUNTY 
Easton 

J. Willard Davis Superintendent of Schools 

M. Lillian Cheezum Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Arthur R. Higginbottom Supervisor of High Schools 

•Kathleen A. Francis Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia S. G. Darrow Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

P. Kennard Wright Supervisor of Maintenance 

Sheldon E. Dietert Controller 

Mrs. Janet R. Deroy Stenographer 

WASHINGTON COUNTY 
Hagerstown 

William M. Brish Superintendent of Schools 

William C. Dieh". Assistant Superintendent 

Wilbur S. Hoopengardner Director of Instruction 

Carl R. Beer Elementary Supervisor 

Annilea H. Browne Elementary Supervisor 

M. Frances Grimes Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Rebekah B. Stonebraker Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

William L. Donaldson Supervisor of Senior High Schools 

Miriam L. Hoffman Supervisor of Music 

Alfred C. Roth, Jr Supervisor of Vocational and Industrial Arts 

H. Edwin Semler Supervisor of Physical Education 

Catherine L. Beachley Supervisor of Guidance and Research 

Russell L. Kepler Supervisor of Plant Operation 

Delbert G. Summerville Supervisor of New Construction 

Claude B. Brubeck Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Anormallee M. Way Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Robert F. Lesher Supervisor of Radio Activities and Publicity 

V. Richard Martin Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

John E. McCue Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Frances H. Machen Visiting Teacher 

Mary E. Byer Special Personnel Services 

Charles W. Ridenour Part Time Personnel Services 

Joseph H. Vance Supervisor of Finance 

Carl M. Mann Supervisor of Purchases 

WICOMICO COUNTY 
Salisbury 

James M. Bennett Superintendent of Schools 

Louise L. Mitchell Supervisor of Instruction 

* Part time 

11 



Name 



Office 



WICOMICO COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Martha R. Jones Supervisor of Instruction 

Royd A. Mahatfey, Jr Supervisor of Instruction 

Marie A. Dashiell Supervisor of Instruction 

Sheldon B. Dawson Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Cora G. Smith Visiting Teacher 

Branche H. Phillips, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 

Joanna Lankford Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Geneva D. Smith Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Phyllis M. Cooper Secretary to Superintendent 

WORCESTER COUNTY 
Snow Hill 

Paul D. Cooper Superintendent of Schools 

Paul S. Hyde Director of Instruction 

Alfred S. Hancock Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Louise S. Adkins Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Annie B. Downing Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Benjamin W. Nelson Supervisor of Maintenance and Transportation 

Wilbur A. Jones Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Elsie M. Dryden Clerk 

BALTIMORE CITY 
3 East Twenty-fifth Street, Baltimore 18 

John H. Fischer Supei'intendent of Public Instruction 

Edwin Stein Deputy Superintendent 

Mary A. Adams Assistant Superintendent of Elementary Education 

Houston R. Jackson Assistant Superintendent 

John W. Lewis Assistant Superintendent Business Management 

Charles W. Sylvester Assistant Superintendent Vocational Education 

J. Carey Taylor Assistant Superintendent Secondary Education 

Helen M. Stegman Administrative Assistant 

Thomas A. Van Sant Director of Adult Education 

Leon L. Winslow Director of Art Education 

George F. Smith, Jr Director of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Edith V. Walker Director of Elementary Education 

Elmon L. Vernier Director of Health and Physical Education 

Kenneth Hjelmervik Director of Music 

W. A. Maccubbin Director of Personnel 

Angela Broening Director of Publications 

Lome Woolatt Director of Research 

William; E. Lehr Director of School Facilities 

Harrie Se'.znik Director of Special Education 

Arthur Lichtenstein Director of Special Services to Pupils 

Helen Herman A ea Director 

Marion Johnson Area Director 

E. Romaine Jones Area Director 

Eleanor Shank Area Director 

Laura M. Wells Area Director 

Albert G. Packard Assistant Director of Aptitude Testing 

Harry Bard Assistant Director of Curricnium Bureau 

Leona C. Buchwald Assistant Director of Guidance and Placement 

Harold B. Chapman Assistant Director of Research 

William M. K. Rawlings Supervisor of Adult Education 

L. Merle Smuck Supervisor of Audio-visual Ediication 

E. Duncan Hyde Supervisor o^' Business Education 

Forest L. Lawton Supervisor of Distributive Education 

H. Spilman Burns Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Dwight S. Cfiskey Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Wallace C. Kirk Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Sol Levin Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Mrs. Emma G. Bright Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Mrs. Rebecca E. Carroll Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

M. Catherine Cohee Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Kathryn Heinz Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Elizabeth Gilpin Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Mrs. Thelma D. Jackson Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Jack Epstein Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Lillian W. Stevenson Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Josephine T. Toro Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Virginia H. Young Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Helen Chambers Supervisor of English 

Mrs. Josie G. Smith Supervisor of English 

HeVn Mixter Supervisor of Geogranhy 

Beulah P. Bcale Supervisor of Handwriting 

Mrs. Tvillian B. Davis Supervisor of Hc»ilth Education 

D. C. Whnrton Smith, M.D Supervisor of Medica' Services 

Mrs. Edythe A. Myers Supervisor of History 

Nellie S. Bu^key Supervisor of Home Economics 

Stanley J. Pawelek Supervisor of Industrial Arts Education 

12 



Name 



BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 



Office 



Corwin H. Taylor 

Marion B. Wiese 

Mrs. Nanette R. Blackiston 

Eunice Bowers 

Grover W. Norris 

Samuel L. Taylor 

Otto K. Schmied 

Mrs. Koma Stinchcomb 

Mrs. Katherine Whiteside Taylor 

Andrew T. Norgan 

C. Elizabeth Armstrong 

EIra M. Palmer 

Alexina Stidham 

Mrs. Lois T. Murray 

Marguerite L. Stem 

Olive A. Whildin 

Mrs. Sarah I. S. Williams 

James O. Proctor 

William J. Hucksoll 

James Francey 

Wesley N. Dorn 

Mrs. Eleanor B. Kane 

Frank Bennett 



Supervisor of Instrumental Music 

Supervisor of Libraries 

.... Special Asst. to Asst. Supt. Sec. Education 

Supervisor of Mathematics 

Supervisor of Mathematics 

Supervisor of Mathematics 

Supervisor of Modern Languages 

. . Supervisor of Occupational and Shop Centers 

Supervisor of Parent Education 

Supervisor of Physical Education 

Supervisor of School Social Work 

Supervisor of Science 

Supervisor of Science 

Supervisor of Special Education 

Supervisor of Special Education 

Supervisor of Special Education 

Supervisor of Special Education 

Supervisor of Vocational Education 

.Supervisor of Vocational Industrial Education 
Supervisor of Vocational Industrial Education 
. . . Special Assistant in General Administration 

Specialist in Radio and TV Education 

Specialist in Safety Education 



13 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 15 

Legislation Affecting Education 16 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 18 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education: 

Certification and Accreditation 29 

Instruction 38 

Library Extension 52 

Vocational Education 59 

Vocational Rehabilitation 63 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 66 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Public and Nonpublic Schools 66 

Number Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools 67 

Education for Handicapped Children, Schools and Classes for Atypical 

Children 68 

Births in Maryland 76 

Withdrawals in Public Schools 79 

Average Number Pupils Belonging 80 

Grade Enrollment 82 

Nonpromotions in Public Schools 85 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 88 

High School Enrollment: by Subject 95 

High School Teachers 96 

Enrollment in Individual Subjects 97 

Teachers: by Summer School Attendance, Certification, Preparation, 

Resignations, Turnover, Source 107 

Number and Size of Schools 120 

Supervisory and Pupil Personnel Services 125 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

Total, Per Cent from State 126 

Distribution of Tax Dollar 128 

Cost per Pupil 129 

Salaries 135 

Average Salaries 136 

Transportation 138 

Adult Education, Vocational Education 141 

School Lunch, School Milk 148 

Capital Outlay, Bonded Indebtedness, Value of School Property 151 

County Levies, Assessments, Tax Rates 155 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges; Junior Colleges 160 

Contributions of Teacheiss to State Teachers' Retirement System 170 

Parent-Teacher Associations 171 

Baltimore City Summer Schools; High School Equivalence 172 

Vocational Rehabilitation 174 

Library Extension, Aid to School Libraries 176 

Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 179 

Index 222 



14 



Baltimore, Maryland 
January 1, 1957 

The Honorable Theodore R. McKeldin 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Dear Governor McKeldin : 

In accordance with the provision of the laws of Maryland, 
I have the honor to present to you herewith, the ninetieth "an- 
nual report covering all operations of the State department of 
education and the support, conditions, progress and needs of 
education throughout the State" for the period beginning July 
1, 1955, and ending June 30, 1956. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 
Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 



15 



16 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



1956 MARYLAND 
GENERAL LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION 

Regular Session 

Incentive Fund 

Chapter 1, Senate Bill 340, increases State aid through the Incentive Fund 
for school construction by $10 per pupil. The full amount of funds 
required by this bill will not be provided until 1957-58. For 1956-57, 
hov^ever, sufficient funds ($2,500,000) to provide an additional $5 per 
pupil have been appropriated by the General Assembly. 

School Construction Loan 

Chapter 80, Senate Bill 79, authorizes the creation of a State debt of 
$75,000,000 to help finance the construction of public school buildings. 
This is a further extension of the General Public School Construction 
Loans of 1949 and 1953. The amount of money which a political sub- 
division may borrow is determined by the total amount of debt which 
could be serviced at prevailing debt service cost by 90 per cent of the 
total State funds (Sherbow money) which are available to that 
political subdivision. The political subdivisions are required to repay 
these loans in 15 years either from local general receipts or from 
State (Sherbow) money. 

General Construction Loan of 1956 

Chapter 98, House Bill 2, authorizes the creation of a State debt of $8,550,- 
167, the proceeds of which will be used to construct, equip, and acquire 
land for certain necessary buildings of this State. The State teachers 
colleges building programs are included in this bill. Following are 
the amounts allotted to each of the colleges: 

Bowie $ 30,500 Salisbury $195,000 

Coppin 7,000 Towson 732,000 

Frostburg 429,000 

Scholarships in Education 

Chapter 127, House Bill 118, provides 152 scholarships, allocated to each 
political subdivision on the basis of its representation in the General 
Assembly, for teacher education to those private colleges approved 
by the State Department of Education. The number of these scholar- 
ships, each of which has a maximum value of $500 per year, will be 
increased by 152 each year for four years, when the full quota of 608 
scholarships will be granted. 

The State Department of Education is charged with the responsi- 
bility of preparing, in co-operation with the institutions, the examina- 
tions, of administering and grading the examinations, and of allo- 
cating the proper funds to the eligible institutions. The institution 
itself must determine the financial status of the applicant's parents, 
since no applicant able to pay the tuition or board costs may be 
accepted. 

Each applicant must give a bond to the State of Maryland that he 
will teach in the public schools of this State for not less than two 
years after graduation. The amount and type of security of the bond 
must be approved by the president of the eligible institution. 

Supplementary Payments to Retired Teachers 

Chapter 33, House Bill 21, provides a minimum pension of $1250 per year 
for all retired teachers who have had at least 25 years of service. 
Retired teachers who are presently receiving less than $3,000 per 
year will be granted additional benefits under a revised formula. The 
formula is based on the beneficiary's current allowance and years 
of service. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



17 



Supplementary Payments to Retired State Employees 

Chapter 125, House Bill 74, completely revises the formula for the payment 
of supplementary retirement benefits to retired State employees. It 
is virtually identical to House Bill 21, which accomplishes the same 
result for retired teachers. The new formula provides for a graduated 
system of supplementary retirement benefits, using a combination of 
regular benefit payments and actual years of service. 

Social Security — Teachers 

Chapter 84, House Bill 60, repeals and re-enacts, with amendments. Sec- 
tion 31, Sub-section 32(b), Sub-section 33(a)(4), Sub-section 34(a) 
(6), and repeals Sub-section 39(b) of Art. 73B, and Section 2 of 
Chapter 636 of the Acts of 1955. The purpose of the changes in the 
Social Security enabling legislation is to give teachers an opportunity 
to receive Social Security benefits in addition to present retirement 
payments. This bill also provides that the benefits under the existing 
retirement system will not be impaired as a result of the proposed 
social security agreement. 

Social Security — Retired Teachers 

Chapter 113, House Bill 124, amends the Teachers Retirement System to 
permit retired teachers to receive benefits from social security. Pre- 
viously retired teachers were prohibited from receiving more than 
one pension or retirement benefit from the State of Maryland. 

Simple Resolutions 

State Training Schools 

Senate Resolution 17 requests the Governor to appoint a commission to 
study the advisability of establishing several institutions similar to 
Rosewood Training School throughout the State. 

Handicapped Children 

House Resolution 34 requests the Legislative Council to set up a commission 
to study a possible program of public education for handicapped 
children of pre-school age. 

Special Session 

University of Maryland 

Chapter 4, Senate Bill 4, repeals Section 243 of Article 77 as amended 
by H.B. 70 - f the Acts of 1956 and enacts a new Section 243, with- 
out change, in lieu thereof. This action was taken to resolve any 
doubts about the validity of the consideration of H.B. 70 at the Regular 
Session of 1956. The bill permits the University of Maryland to 
include dormitory +'acilitie3 in the student union building which is to 
be constructed in Baltimore City. 

Bond Authorization — Baltimore City 

Chapter 8, House Bill 2, authorizes the Mayor and City Council of Balti- 
more to borrov/ an amount not to exceed $15,000,000 for the acquisi- 
tion of school sites and for the construction of school facilities. 

Bond Authorization — Dorchester County 

Chapter 9, House Bill 3, authorizes the County Commissioners of Dorchester 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $1,000,000 for the acquisi- 
tion of school sites and for the construction of school facilities. 

Bond Authorization — Garrett County 

Chapter 11, House Bill 10, authorizes the County Commissioners of Garrett 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $550,000 for the acquisition 
of school sites and for the construction of school facilities. 

Bond Authorization — Harford County 

Chapter 5, House Bill 5, authorizes the County Commissioners of Harford 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $1,500,000 to finance the 
construction or extension of public school facilities. 



18 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD 
OF EDUCATION 

August 31, 1955 

An opinion of the Attorney General was requested regard- 
ing the authority vested in the State Board of Education to 
enter into a contract with the Secretary of the United States 
Department of Health, Education and Welfare in order to carry 
out the disability determinations provisions of the Federal So- 
cial Security Act (Section 221, Title 42, USCA Section 421b). 
The Attorney General advised that Chapter 513 of the Acts of 
the General Assembly, 1955 Session, (effective June 1, 1955) 
vests the State Board of Education with all the necessary au- 
thority to co-operate with the Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare to enter into any contracts with the Department 
or with any other agency or instrumentality of the United 
States which are necessary and desirable to carry out the dis- 
ability determinations provisions. The Attorney General fur- 
ther advised that under Section 15 of Article 77 of the Anno- 
tated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition), the State Superin- 
tendent of Schools as the chief executive, the Secretary, and the 
Treasurer of the State Board of Education, has the authority 
to execute on behalf of the State Board of Education any con- 
tracts negotiated under and in accordance with provisions of 
Chapter 513 of the Acts of 1955. 

The Board approved an amendment to the Maryland State 
Plan for Vocational Education to establish the followin^^^ quali- 
fications for a State Supervisor of Educational Services to In- 
dustry : 

(1) Education 

A state supervisor shall be a graduate of an accredited 
college with professional courses in education, such as 
Educational Psychology, Methods of Teaching, Trade and 
Job Analyses, Practice Teaching, Administration in Indus- 
dustrial Education, Methods and Materials in Adult Edu- 
cation, Seminar in Industrial Education. 

(2) Experience 

He must have had at least 3 years of practical work as a 
full-time teacher of an approved trade-preparatory or trade- 
extension class of a standard required in the State Plan. 
He must hav^ had at least 3 years of experience in the 
administration and supervision of trade and industrial edu- 
cation of a standard required in the State Plan. 

The Board approved the following salary scale for teachers 
in Adult Education : 

First year's experience as teacher — 

each two-hour session $7.00 

Second year's experience and thereafter — 

each two-hour session $8.50 



Maryland State Department of Education 



19 



Among the changes in titles, appointments, and separations 
approved by the Board were the following : 

Dr. John J. Seidel Change in title from Assistant State 

bupenntendent for Vocational Educa- 
tion to Assistant Superintendent. Dr. 
Seidel will continue to serve as Direc- 
tor of Vocational Education, but it is 
not necessary to include this in his 
title in order to receive Federal money 
for his salary. Effective July 1, 1955. 



Miss Margaret E. Albaugh 



Mr. C. William Anthony 



Mr. John M. Cobun 
Mr. Leslie B. Cole 
Mr. J. Leo Delaney 

Mr. H. Dorsey Devlin 

Miss Minnie Gerber 

Miss Ruth E. Hobbs 

Mr. Bernard E. Kelly 
Dr. Harold D. Reese 

Mr. William S. Sartorius 
Mr. M. Eugene Spurrier 



From Stenographer-Secretary to Ad- 
ministrative Assistant. Effective July 
27, 1955. 

From Assistant Supervisor of Re- 
search, Division of Administration and 
Finance, to Supervisor of Teacher Edu- 
cation, Division of Certification and 
Accreditation. Effective September 1, 
1955. 

Appointed Counselor, Division of Re- 
habilitation. Effective July 27, 1955. 

Appointed Counselor, Division of Re- 
habilitation. Effective August 10, 1955. 

From Counselor to Assistant Super- 
visor, Division of Rehabilitation. Effec- 
tive July 1, 1955. 

From Counselor to Assistant Super- 
visor, Division of Rehabilitation. Effec- 
tive July 27, 1955. 

From Principal Account Clerk II, Di- 
vision of Administration and Finance, 
to Junior Counselor, Disability Deter- 
minations Program, Division of Re- 
habilitation. Effective July 27, 1955. 

From Administrative Assistant to As- 
sistant Supervisor of Equivalence Ex- 
aminations, Division of Certification 
and Accreditation. Effective July 27, 
1955. 

Appointed Counselor, Division of Re- 
habilitation. Effective August 10, 1955, 

Appointed Supervisor of Teachers Col- 
lege Business Management, Division 
of Administration and Finance. Effec- 
tive July 27, 1955. 

From Assistant Director to Director, 
Division of Administration and Fi- 
nance. Effective July 27, 1955. 

Appointed Counselor, Division of Re- 
habilitation. Effective August 17, 1955. 



20 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



Mrs'. Martha C. Trate 



Appointed Junior Counselor, Disability- 
Determinations Program, Division of 
Rehabilitation. Effective July 27, 1955. 



Mrs. Grace S. Travers 



From Principal Account Clerk I, Di- 
vision of Administration and Finance, 
to Counselor, Division of Certification 
and Accreditation. Effective July 27, 
1955. 



Dr. S. J. Venable 



Appointed Medical Adviser, Disability 
Determinations Program, Division of 
Rehabilitation. Effective July 27, 1955. 



Mr. F. de Paul Whitehurst Appointed Junior Counselor, Disability 



The Board heard the appeal of Mr. Andrew A. Lipscomb 
and other residents of the Rollingwood area of Montgomery 
County versus the Board of Education and the Superintendent 
of Schools of Montgomery County. The basic issue in the appeal 
was whether or not the State Board of Education should alter 
the decision of the County Board of Education and County Su- 
perintendent in closing the Linden School, a physically sub- 
standard elementary school, and in deciding to transfer the 
pupils from said school to McKenney Hills, Woodlin, and Rolling- 
wood Elementary Schools, until such time as the Rosemary Hills 
School, now under construction, was completed in the fall of 
1956. The appellants objected to so much of the decision as 
related to the transfer of 32 pupils to the Rollingwood School. 
There was no protest to the transfer of pupils either to the 
McKenney Hills School or to the Woodlin School. 

In an opinion and order dated September 1, 1955, the State 
Board of Education denied the above appeal, concluding that 
the Montgomery County Board of Education and its County 
Superintendent acted within their legal rights. It pointed out, 
however, in view of the evidence, that the County Board may 
desire, in its discretion, to modify procedural details of its plan, 
this being a matter ^or local determination. 



The Board was informed that according to an opinion of the 
Attorney General ''the $600 grant in aid to the parent of a han- 
dicapped child, which is provided by Section 234(c). does not 
cover and has no application to the parent of any child suffering 
from deafness, for the reason that the laws clearly indicate that 
the parent of such child is to bear the burden of its education 



Determinations Program, Division of 
Rehabilitation. Effective August 3, 
1955. 



Dr. David W. Zimmerman 



From Assistant Superintendent, Divi- 
sion of Administration and Finance, to 
Assistant Superintendent. Effective 
July 27, 1955. 



November 23, 1955 



Maryland State Department of Education 



21 



unless, by reason of financial inability, transportation expenses 
may be defrayed by the State or the child may be admitted to 
the Maryland State School for the Deaf at Frederick." The 
question was raised whether the law should not be changed so 
that the same aid might be given for the tuition of a deaf child 
as for the tuition of children suffering from other handicaps. 

The State Superintendent reported that the Frank Knox 
School at Lexington Park, Maryland, has been turned over by 
the U. S. Navy to the St. Mary's County Board of Education. 

The State Board president reported that in a conference 
of local school board members held in Baltimore on November 
18, 1955, the group voted to form a State organization with the 
idea of later joining the national organization. 

The State Superintendent reported that three meetings had 
been held in preparation for the White House conference on 
education. In these meetings, the proportion of lay people to the 
professional educators involved was approximately two to one. 
A bulletin on the five problems discussed in the Maryland Con- 
ference has been published and will probably be used for later 
local conferences. 

The Board's attention was called to the report recently 
issued by the commission appointed by Governor Theodore R. 
McKeldin to study the needs of higher education in Maryland. 

The Board approved the revision of By-law 12 on Public 
School Transportation to become effective January 1, 1956. Dr. 
Zimmerman pointed out that for more than ten years the State 
has had standards and specifications for school buses, these regu- 
lations being patterned after the national standards which v/ere 
revised in 1954. One specification which has been added in the 
Maryland regulations is that of an emergency door lock. Al- 
though the regulations will apply to new buses only, the super- 
intendents plan to have the emergency door locks installed on 
buses now in use. 

The Board authorized the State Superintendent to recom- 
mend to the Legislature that the appropriation for adult educa- 
tion should not be confined to vocational education. 

The Board approved the recommendations of the Commit- 
tee on the new salary scale for the professional personnel at the 
State teachers colleges and authorized the inclusion of the higher 
salaries in the 1957 budget. Representatives of the State teachers 
colleges and the State Department of Education had met on two 
occasions with the State Board Committee on teachers colleges 
to consider the salary problem. The group agreed on six spe- 
cific recommendations as follows : 

1. The salary scale should be based on four rather than three 
separate categories, e. g., Bachelor's, Master's, Master's plus 
30 hours, and Doctor's. 



22 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



2. Increments should be uniform among all State employees, as 
well as college faculty members, meaning that the salary scale 
should be based on five (5) increments. 

3. The salary schedule suggested is as follows: 

Bachelor's Degree $3,500— $5,000 (Increments: $300.) 

Master's Degree 4,500— 6,500 (Increments: $400.) 

Master's plus 30 5,000— 7,000 (Increments: $400.) 

Doctor's Degree 5,500— 8,000 (Increments: $500.) 

The maximum to be reached in each case in 5 equal increments. 

4. Regardless of academic degrees held, it is recommended that the 
dean of each college should be on a salary schedule beginning 
at $7,000, with five increments of $500 each, thereby reaching 
the maximum of $9,500 in five years. 

5. Directors and principals of campus schools should receive $500 
over and above the faculty salary schedule. 

6. It is recommended that each faculty person be placed on the 
new scale where he would receive a salary increase of not less 
than $200. 

The Board also approved the principle of sabbatical leave 
and authorized a sum not to exceed $50,000 for this purpose in 
the 1957 budget. It designated the Board President and Vice- 
president, and the State Superintendent to work out the details 
on sabbatical leave. It also authorized this Committee to deter- 
mine a new salary scale for the teachers college presidents. This 
Committee was also authorized to meet with the Governor to 
request him to include in the budget money for the increased 
teachers' salaries, for sabbatical leave and for higher compen- 
sation for the teachers college presidents. 

February 29, 1956 

Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. was reappointed by the Board to 
a four-year term beginning June 1, 1956. At the same time the 
Board passed the following resolution in recognition of the com- 
pletion of fourteen years of service by Dr. Pullen as State Su- 
perintendent of schools. 

Resolution on Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 

The State Board of Education takes great pride in recognizing 
the completion today of fourteen years of service by Dr. Thomas 
G. Pullen, Jr. as State Superintendent of Schools of Maryland. 
These years have brought to Maryland, as to all states, urupually 
difficult and trying problems in connection with the administra- 
tion of Public Sciiools and Teachers Colleges, but with the intelli- 
gent, honest, vigorous and understanding leadership of our State 
Superintendent, Maryland continues to be a guiding light in the 
education and training of youth, a light which shines brightly 
throughout the nation. The Board has always been cognizant and 
appreciative of the fact that with devoted and consecrated lead- 
ership such as that furnished by Dr. Pullen and the thoughtful 
and continuing co-operation of the Executive and Legislative 
branches of the Government of Maryland, the children of our 
State are the fortunate recipients of educational opportunities 
not surpassed by any State in the Union. We are indeed grateful 



Maryland State Department of Education 



23 



to Dr. Pullen for his genuine interest in and love for children — 
prerequisites for effective leadership in the field of public educa- 
tion. And so today, we pause to pay tribute to this gentleman, 
scholar, educator, nationally recognized school administrator, and 
friend of all children — the State Superintendent of Schools of 
Maryland. 



Mr. George B. Moreland, Director of the Montgomery 
County Department of Public Libraries and Chairman of the 
Committee to study the public library situation in Maryland, 
reported on the work of the committee to date. The committee 
considered library needs of all areas in Maryland (the whole 
State, counties or areas, and smaller localities) in the light of 
population predictions as well as the function of the Division 
of Library Extension. The Library Committee reached the con- 
clusion that the Library Extension Division should continue to 
develop and advise the libraries ; that it should contract with the 
Enoch Pratt Free Library for reference service. 

Further, in some parts of the State there should be area 
libraries rather than county libraries or at least central distrib- 
uting places, since it is not economical or efficient to give library 
services to fewer than 75,000 people. Some of the counties would 
therefore need to combine, if they were to receive adequate 
service at a reasonable cost. Local or branch libraries might be 
placed in centers within one and a half miles of at least 3,000 
people. With fewer t^^an this number of people within a one- 
and-a-half -mile radius, services might be arranged in a shopping 
center. Bookmobiles might be used to advantage in other situ- 
ations. There are now twenty bookmobiles in Maryland. The 
Committee is convinced that it is inadvisable to try to combine 
school and public libraries, although if a classroom is the only 
available space in which to start a library, it may be advisable 
to use the classroom, temporarily. A formal report will be made 
later by the Library Committee. 

The Board was advised that after September 1, 1956, the 
Baltimore City Department of Education will no longer pay 
critic teachers who work with the seniors at the State Teachers 
College at Towson, who do their practice teaching in Baltimore. 
The City will permit the payment, selection, and assignment of 
the critic teachers to be controlled by the respective colleges, 
as is the procedure in the counties. The Attorney-General has 
indicated by an opinion that the critic teachers in all areas in 
Maryland should be treated alike, and the State Superintendent 
informed the Board that he had asked the Governor to include 
$20,800 in his supplementary budget to cover the payments to 
the Baltimore City critic teachers. 

The Board adopted the following resolution on the retire- 
ment of Miss Me^le S. Bateman, Director of the Division of 
Certification and Accreditation, effective August 1, 1956. 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



Resolution on Miss Merle S. Bateman 

Miss Merle S. Bateman came to the State Department of Edu- 
cation in 1918 to handle the certification of pre-professional train- 
ing and professional schools of the State. Prior to her service 
with the State Department of Education Miss Bateman had been 
Secretary to the Dean of the Medical School of the University of 
Maryland, the capacity in which she served for several years. 

Miss Bateman was born in St. Mary's County and was gradu- 
ated from the Western High School and from Goucher College, 
having majored in the fields of English and Mathematics. For 
three years she taught in Missouri and then assumed the position 
at the University of Maryland mentioned above. 

When the laws of the State were changed as a result of the 
survey of 1916 to require all teaching certificates to be issued by 
the State Department of Education, Miss Bateman was made re- 
sponsible for this task. This was a period of unusual transition 
from a system in which teachers were given certificates on the 
basis of examinations administered by the local school adminis- 
trators, who were then known as School Examiners, to a system 
of certification based upon academic and professional training. 
The new responsibility entailed the charting of a new course, the 
setting up of an entirely different set of standards, and the ad- 
ministering of these standards in respect to thousands of teachers, 
many of whom were not s^Tnpathetic to the new procedure. Miss 
Bateman's position and responsibilities required meticulous ad- 
herence to the new standards and the utmost fairness and firm- 
ness. The manner in which Miss Bateman performed her duties 
and her impartial treatment of all gradually brought about ac- 
ceptance of the new procedure and phenomenal improvement in the 
qualifications of the teachers of the State. At the present time 
the professional qualifications of the teachers of Maryland are 
among the highest in the nation and their standing is due in a 
large measure to the administration of the program and the sug- 
gestions for its improvement by Miss Bateman. 

In 1947 the State Department of Education was reorganized 
along divisional lines. Miss Bateman, who already had the title of 
Director of Certification, was made Director of the Division of Cer- 
tification and Accreditation. In this major capacity she was re- 
sponsible for the administration of the law requiring the approval 
of all institutions cf learning charging tuition in the State. This 
was an unusual responsibility. Miss Bateman did a splendid job 
in developing the standards for the many and varied types of 
schools and in a-,3plying them to the individual schools. The stand- 
ards under which this program is now operated are due in a large 
measure to the pioneer work Miss Bateman did in this field. 

In her early days in the Department Miss Bateman performed 
many special duties in addition to the more important ones. For 
some years she served as Office Manager and for a long period of 
time did all the editorial work of the Department. Possibly the 
most interesting and pleasant of all the special tasks she per- 
formed was that of assisting the Secretary of the State Board, 
the State Superintendent of Schools, in preparing the agenda and 
keeping the minutes of the meetings of the State Board of Edu- 
cation. In this capacity she came to know and to be associated with 
every member of the State Board for several decades. The mem- 
bers of the State Board, past and present, will remember Miss 
Bateman with gratitude. 

Miss Bateman is a person of keen intellect, interested in schol- 
arlv matters and in civic and academic organizations, and is a de- 
lightful and interesting conversationalist and companion. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



25 



The State Department of Education and the State Board of 
Education express to her their deep appreciation and thanks for 
the efficient service she rendered to the Department and to the 
schools of the State during her many years of service and wish her 
many years of happy retired life. 

Approval was given by the Board to the following changes 
in positions in the State Department of Education: 

Mr. W. Theodore Boston — From Assistant Director to Direc- 
tor, Division of Certification and Accreditation. Effective August 
1, 1956. 

Mr. James L. Reid — From Supervisor of School Plant Plan- 
ning in the Division of Certification and Accreditation to Assist- 
ant Director and Supervisor of School Plant Planning in the same 
division. Effective August 1, 1956. 

The Board voted to change the degrees offered to graduates 
of the teachers colleges to read "Bachelor of Science" instead of 
"Bachelor of Science in Education." 

The Board adopted the following resolution with regard 
to Dr. Miles W. Connor, President of the Coppin State Teachers 
College, who plans to retire on June 30, 1956. A committee was 
appointed to make recommendations concerning a successor to 
Dr. Connor. 

Resolution on Dr. Miles W. Connor 

As Dr. Miles W. Connor retires from his position as Presi- 
dent of the Coppin State Teachers College, the State Board of 
Education wishes to express its appreciation of his zealous service 
to public education in Maryland. 

Dr. Connor was born near Portsmouth, Virginia. His early 
education was secured at Churchland and the Norfolk Mission 
College. In 1909 he was graduated from Virginia Union Univer- 
sity. 

Beginning immediately his teaching career Dr. Connor's first 
assignment was at Selma University, Selma, Alabama, as a 
teacher of English and mathematics. Successive assignments were 
also filled as Assistant Principal, Corey Memorial Institute, Ports- 
mouth, Virginia; Professor of Education at Virginia State Col- 
lege, Petersburg, Virginia; and Supervisor of War Camp Com- 
munity Service, Delaware to Texas area. 

In 1920 Dr. Connor returned to the Virginia Union Univer- 
sity, where he organized the Department of Education which he 
headed until being called to Baltimore to serve as Principal of the 
Colored Training School which became Coppin Normal School in 
1927. This institution was renamed Coppin Teachers College in 
1938 and became a State Teachers College in 1950. 

Dr. Connor holds the Master of Arts degree from Howard 
University and the Master of Education degree from Columbia 
University. In 1936 he received his Ph.D. degree from New York 
University. He has always devoted himself enthusiastically to 
the responsibilities he has undertaken. Under his leadership and 
direction Coppin State Teachers College has developed from a 
small training school, housed in a few rooms, to a Teachers Col- 
lege housed in its o>vn building surrounded by an attractive cam- 



26 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



pus. During the period of time Dr. Connor has worked in Mary- 
land more than 1,500 students have been prepared for teaching 
and of these a large number are still engaged in the instruction 
of boys and girls. Currently 300 additional students are studying 
under his direction. 

While devoted to the cause of public education and possessed 
with a contagious enthusiasm for teaching, Dr. Connor has not 
neglected his civic and religious duties. He has served for eighteen 
years as Superintendent of the Sunday School at the Sharon 
Baptist Church and is now vice-president of the Council of 
Churches and Christian Education of Maryland and Delaware. 
Active membership is also held in several civic and fraternal or- 
ganizations. May he enjoy the well-deserved leisure which soon 
will be his! The best wishes of the State Department of Educa- 
tion and the State Board of Education go with him in his re- 
tirement. 

May 30, 1956 

At the annual organization meeting of the Board, Mr. Wen- 
dell D. Allen and Mr. Jerome Framptom were re-elected Presi- 
dent and Vice-president, respectively, of the State Board of 
Education. 

Dr. Geneva Flickinger presented revised "Standards, Rules, 
and Regulations Governing the Provision of Special Programs 
for Handicapped Children Who Are Residents of Maryland." 
These revised standards v^ere approved by the Board. The Board 
then gave its approval to the program for handicapped chil- 
dren as it is developing in Maryland and went on record to en- 
courage the counties to bring into the program all the handi- 
capped children who can profit by it. 

In reporting on Federal funds received for the School Lunch 
and School Milk Programs it was indicated that additional funds 
had been made available since both programs were larger than 
those provided for in the original allocation. Dr. John Seidel 
said that 45,000,000 half-pint bottles of milk will be served in 
the schools in the school year 1955-56 as compared with 22,000,- 
€00 half-pints served in 1954-55. 

It was pointed out that legislation had been passed by the 
1956 General Assembly of Maryland to put social security into 
effect on July 1, 1956. Since this additional social security cover- 
age will not be available unless members of the retirement sys- 
tems vote favorably on the proposal, a referendum is scheduled 
for June, 1956. A majority vote of all eligible voters (members 
of the retirement systems) will be necessary. Enabling legis- 
lation was passed by the 1955 legislature permitting employees 
of the State, who are in the State retirement systems, to par- 
ticipate in Federal social security benefits. 

In reporting on the status of desegregation the State Su- 
perintendent pointed out that county boards of education are 
endeavoring to carry out the law and the decision of the Supreme 
Court. Desegregation has been started in some counties, while 



Maryland State Department of Education 



27 



in other counties citizens committees appointed by the county- 
boards of education have been working on the problem. 

The Board was informed that the State Superintendent 
had been invited by President Eisenhower to attend the meet- 
ing in Annapolis on June 18 and June 19 to study the fitness 
of American youth. 

The State Board approved changes in positions and new 
appointments in the State Department of Education as listed 
below : 

Mr. Foy L. Lunsford — From Counselor in charge of the Dis- 
ability Determinations program in the Division of Vocational Re- 
habilitation to Assistant Supervisor in the same program. Effective 
July 1, 1956. 

Dr. Harold D. Reese — From Supervisor of Teachers College 
Business Management, Division of Administration and Finance, 
to Supervisor of Teacher and Higher Education in the Division 
of Certification and Accreditation. Effective August 1, 1956. 

Dr. W. Bird Terwilliger — From Supervisor of Guidance Train- 
ing and Placement, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, to As- 
sistant Director of the Division. Effective July 1, 1956. 

Mr. F. DePaul Whitehurst — From Junior Counselor in the 
Disability Determinations program in the Division of Vocational 
Rehabilitation to Counselor in the same program. Effective July 
1, 1956. 

Dr. Harold E. Bc^-ley succeeds Dr. Reese as Supervisor of 
Teachers College Business Management. He comes from the State 
Teachers College at Salisbury where he served as Dean of Instruc- 
tion from 1949. Effective August 1, 1956. 

Mr. Howard B. Dean — Counselor in the Division of Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation, Western Maryland District. Mr. Dean pre- 
viously served as Case Worker in the Department of Public Wel- 
fare, Cecil County. Effective July 1, 1956. 

Mrs. Margaret W. Harris — Counselor in the Division of Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation, Metropolitan Baltimore office. Mrs. Harris 
comes to Maryland from the Florida Department of Public Welfare 
at West Palm Beach. Effective July 1, 1956. 

Dr. Thomas W. Pyles — Supervisor to work with the training 
schools and other institutions in order to provide better educa- 
tional programs for atypical children. Dr. Pyles comes to the 
Department from Montgomery County where he served as Prin- 
cipal of the Poolesville Senior High School. Effective September 
1, 1956. 

Mr. Loren Rice — Counselor in the Division of Vocational Re- 
habilitation, Southern Maryland District. Mr. Rice comes to the 
Department from the Dynafone Hearing Aid Co. of Washington, 
D. C, where he was sales manager. Effective July 1, 1956. 

The Board also approved the appointment of Dr. Parlett 
L. Moore to succeed Dr. Miles W. Connor as President of Coppin 
State Teachers College in Baltimore, effective July 1, 1956. Dr» 
Moore has previously been a teacher and principal in the F. D. 



28 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



St. Clair High School, Dorchester County, and later in Mont- 
gomery County where he served first as Principal of Lincoln 
High School and then as Principal of Carver High School. In 
addition to the latter capacity he served as Dean of Carver 
Junior College since its establishment in 1950. 

Approval was also given by the Board to the following 
action : 

1. Membership of the State Department of Education in the 
Council of Social Agencies. 

2. Modification of the agreement with the Secretary of the De- 
partment of Health, Education and Welfare to carry out pro- 
vision of Section 221 of the Social Security Act. The effect 
of this modification is to permit a Disability Determination 
Secretary of the Rehabilitation Division to handle more cases 
and to exclude those cases which are covered by the Railroad 
Retirement Act of 1937. Mr. Thompson explained that under 
the amended agreement his office will take care of determining 
disability incurred prior to January 1, 1954, instead of con- 
fining the cases handled by his department to cases where the 
disability began subsequent to that date. 

3. Tentative adoption of requirements for certification of speech 
therapists and specialists in hearing education. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



29 



DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 

The services of the Division of Certification and Accredita- 
tion may be reported generally under four broad headings : 

1. Certification of teachers 

2. Accreditation of educational programs 

3. School plant planning 

4. High school equivalence certificates 

The work involving the certification of teachers includes 
the public schools and approved private schools located within 
the State of Maryland. 

In the accreditation of educational programs several areas 
are considered: higher education; teacher education; Maryland 
nonpublic academic schools which may enroll pupils from nur- 
sery school through the secondary school age; and Maryland 
nonpublic nonacademic schools which offer instruction in trade 
and technical activities, music, dancing, beauty culture, and 
similar areas. 

The school plant planning program provides services to the 
public schools of the State, including the teachers colleges. 

High school equivalence provides the means whereby per- 
sons who have been unable to secure a high school diploma may, 
on the basis of an examination, be issued a certificate which for 
legal purposes is equivalent to high school graduation. 

Certification 

As will be seen from TABLE 44, page 109, the number of 
certificates issued to teachers, supervisors, and administrators 
remains at a high level. During the years 1955-56, 3,654 certifi- 
cates for teaching in the schools of Maryland were issued, a num- 
ber smaller by only 25 than the number issued in 1954-55. More 
certificates were issued to elementary teachers than in the pre- 
ceding year. These figures continue to reflect the increasing 
pupil population, ana teacher turnover. 

The number of emergency certificates issued in 1955-56 
shows a decrease over the number issued the previous year. 
However, the number of emergency certificates in effect con- 
tinues to remain at a relatively high level of approximately 28 
per cent. It is true, nevertheless, that approximately 57 per 
cent of the emergency and substandard certificates have been 
issued to applicants who have graduated from college but have 
engaged in no recent formal study or who lack some of the 
necessary professional or academic preparation required for full 
certificates. Such teachers may, with comparatively little effort, 
qualify for regular certificates. Furthermore, many of the 
teachers who were issued provisional certificates had previously 
held regular certificates but had failed to qualify for their re- 
newal. 



80 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



Accreditation 



Section 20 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 
1951 edition, provides that, with certain exceptions, nonpublic 
schools may operate in Maryland only if they are approved by 
the State Superintendent. (See the Eighty -fourth Annual Re- 
port of the Maryland State Board of Education, page 21.) While 
the law exempts from its provision schools operated by bona fide 
church organizations, it has been the custom of the State Super- 
intendent to approve, on a voluntary basis, colleges and second- 
ary schools conducted by church groups. 



The institutions of higher learning, most of which have 
State charters, have requested and received approval as follows : 



These figures have changed but very little since last year, there 
being no change in the number of colleges and universities on the 
approved list. One additional junior college has been added. One 
school of nursing was discontinued and one additional separate 
professional school has been approved. 

Both the Director and the Assistant Director kept in close 
touch with the six Maryland institutions of higher learning at 
which plans for the preparation of elementary school teachers 
had been approved two years previously. In every instance each 
institution concerned has made decided progress with this new 
program. 

The Assistant Director represented the Department in the 
evaluation of three institutions by the Middle States Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools. As a result of the evaluation 
of the Salisbury State Teachers College, the institution was 
placed on the approved list by the Middle States Association. 



The number and kind of nonpublic academic schools below 
college level which were operating in the State in 1955-56 and 
were approved by the Department were as follows : 



Institutions of Higher Learning 



Colleges and universities 

Junior colleges 

Schools of nursing 

Separate professional schools 



22 
13 
19 
8 



Nonpublic Academic Schools Below College Level 



Maryland State Department of Education 



31 



Type of School 



Number 



Secondary 

Secondary-Elementary 

Secondary-Elementary-Kindergarten-Nursery School 

Secondary-Elementary-Kindergarten 

Tutoring 

Special 

Elementary 

Elementary-Kindergarten 

Elementary-Kindergarten-Nursery School 

Primary 

Primary-Kindergarten 

Primary-Kindergarten-Nursery School 

Kindergarten 

Kindergarten-Nursery School 

Nursery School 



41 
7 
1 
1 
8 

10 
4 
7 



5 
33 
24 
36 



1 



Total 



190 



Secondary Schools 



The two State Supervisors of High Schools in the Depart- 
ment of Education have the responsibility of visiting and evalu- 
ating the nonpublic secondary schools in Maryland. Each super- 
visor visits the schools in his regular territory. On the list of 
nonpublic secondary schools so approved are fifty regular second- 
ary institutions and eight tutoring schools. Of these fifty-eight 
schools, thirty-five are church-operated and twenty-three are pri- 
vately operated. Of the thirty-five church schools, thirty-three 
are operated under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Church, 
one under the auspices of a Hebrew Congregation, and one is a 
Presbyterian school. In addition to the schools operating in 
Maryland under the control of a bona fide religious organization, 
there are priv;'te schools which have charters from the Maryland 
Assembly and which are exempt from the approval requirements. 
Any of these institutions may request approval of the State 
Superintendent of Schools. 

Each approved school submits a report during the month 
of November, and, prior to the visit to these schools by the 
supervisor, the schools' reports and teacher certification status 
are reviewed. 

Many of the nonpublic secondary schools have operated 
over a long period of years and few new secondary schools have 
been established recently. From time to time a church-operated 
school or a private school operating under a charter, which has 
not been previously approved by this Department, will ask for 
and receive approval. 



32 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



Elementary Schools, Primary Schools, Kindergartens, and 
Nursery Schools 

These schools may be classified in the following way : 

Co-operatives with parents participating 30 

Co-operatives administered by parents who do not participate 

daily 10 

Small centers (three groups or less) owned by individuals 50 

Large centers owned by individuals 13 

Large centers governed by boards of directors 25 

Church-sponsored centers 6 

Other groups (sponsored by housing projects, civic groups, 

colleges) 12 



Total 146 

In the nursery school-kindergarten classification there are 
sixteen centers which operate long hours to care for the children 
of working parents. In some of these centers the program offers 
little more than custodial care. During the year, two special 
schools were approved, one of which olTers services to the emo- 
tionally disturbed and the other serves children retarded men- 
tally. Two co-operative nursery schools and two co-operative 
kindergartens were also approved. 

Enrollments in the nonpublic elementary and preschool cen- 
ters during the two years 1954-55 and 1955-56, including new 
schools approved during each of these years, were as follows : 

Enrollmevt 

Type of School 1951^-55 1955-56 

Nursery 2,161 2,244 

Kindergarten 2,176 2,220 

Elementary 3,424 3,526 

Special 468 443 



Total 8,229 8,433 

Of the 8,433 children enrolled, 683 attended sessions in cen- 
ters providing long hours of care. The greatest increase in en- 
rollment is founr" in the number of children in nonpublic elemen- 
tary schools. The only decrease in enrollment was in the special 
schools. This may be due to the fact that some counties have 
opened new centers for handicapped children. 

Nine applications for approval of schools in this category 
were refused. In most instances the teachers lacked sufficient 
training or the ability to conduct a suitable program. 

There are in the State of Maryland a number of child-care 
centers which do not meet the standards for approval as schools. 
Heretofore such centers were operated with little or no super- 
vision. Over the past two years a series of meetings has been 
held under the direction of the State Department of Health, in 
which proposed standards for the control of day-care centers 
in Maryland have been developed. These proposed standards 



Maryland State Department of Education 



33 



have now been accepted by the heads of the three departments 
to which they were submitted. When these standards are put 
into effect, the child-care centers formerly operating without 
any State supervision will have basic standards with which to 
comply. The State Department of Health will in all probability 
be the Department responsible for the administration of this 
program in the day care of children. 

Nonacademic Schools 

During the school year 1955-56, nineteen additional non- 
public nonacademic schools were approved and received certifi- 
cates from the State Superintendent. The schools belong in the 
following categories : 

Beauty culture Dance 
Business education Hair designing 

Trade and technical areas Music 

Art 

As of June 30, 1956, 185 trade and technical schools were 
operating and met the conditions for approval under Section 20 
of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 1951 edition. 

When a new application for approval is considered in areas 
in which persons with expert knowledge are not available as staff 
members of this Department, consultants are secured. During 
the past year consultants have been employed for advice in the 
fields of art, music, drama, electronics, Civil Service employment, 
and telephone switchboard operation. In most cases these con- 
sultants were employed for one or two days only. Staff members 
have worked closely with representatives of the Civil Aeronau- 
tics Administration and the Post Office Inspectors Division, in 
connection with programs offered by flight schools and corre- 
spondence schools. The advice and assistance of various other 
State Boards of Examiners have been sought frequently, and 
numerous meetings have also been held with the investigating 
staff of the Better Business Bureau, for the purpose of following 
up complaints about questionable advertising practices and ques- 
tionable procedures in business management. The Veterans Ad- 
ministration and the Better Business Bureau have also been of 
assistance in the review of other complaints concerning the qual- 
ity of instruction at certain schools. 

Twelve trade or technical schools closed during the academic 
year. 

Approval for Veterans' Training 

A special responsibility of the Division of Certification and 
Accreditation is the approval of schools for veterans' training. 

As of June 30, 1956, 46 trade and technical schools were 
approved to offer instruction to veterans under Public Laws 346 



34 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



and 550, or under Public Law 550 alone. Resident or extension 
courses offered by 40 institutions of higher learning were ap- 
proved for veterans, as were 109 residencies and internships 
provided by hospitals and medical schools and eight curriculums 
for the training of registered nurses. A few nonpublic secondary 
schools were also approved for veterans' training. 

School Plant Planning 

This phase of the work of the Division covers activities 
related to both the public school systems of Maryland and the 
five State Teachers Colleges. 

Consultative service is offered to the counties in areas of 
surveys, site selection, pre-planning and final planning, and con- 
tractual services. In addition, this Division is charged with the 
responsibility of carrying out those duties which are specifically 
assigned by statute to the Department or to the State Superin- 
tendent of Schools, These include the approval of all plans and 
specifications for new buildings or the remodeling of old build- 
ings where the cost exceeds $300 ; the purchase or sale of 
grounds, school sites or buildings; and the approval of all con- 
struction contracts and change orders. 

This Division administers the construction program at the 
various teachers colleges, including the preparation of the capi- 
tal improvement programs and extending through final inspec- 
tion. Close liaison is maintained between the Department, the 
office of the college president, and the various other State agen- 
cies, such as the Department of Public Improvements, the Board 
of Public Works, and the Department of Budget and Procure- 
ment. 

Faculty committees have been selected at each institution 
to work on the preparation of educational specifications for each 
building. These specifications set forth the details of facility 
requirements and form the basis for discussion with the archi- 
tect and in large measure determine the nature, size, and cost of 
the building. In addition, professional engineers have been em- 
ployed at three of the institutions to assist in over-all campus 
development, location of buildings, parking areas, athletic fields, 
and roadways, and to make recommendations concerning land- 
scape problems. 

HioH School Equivalence 

The Maryland General Assembly of 1941 authorized the 
State Board of Education to administer examinations leading 
to the Maryland Certificate of High School Equivalence, which 
"shall be the legal equivalence of a high school diploma and 
which in addition shall be accepted as meeting the State require- 
ments of a high school education for admission to the study of 
the various professions and vocations." 



Maryland State Department of Education 



35 



This legislation was passed in order to enable persons who 
had left school before high school graduation to secure certain 
promotions in State and Federal work and to enter certain pro- 
fessional programs of study. The intent of the legislation was 
not to provide an education but merely to offer a means by which 
past educational experiences may be evaluated. 

In October, 1941, the first series of examinations was ad- 
ministered. The program now operates with the General Edu- 
cation Development Tests serving almost entirely as the examin- 
ing device. Eight official testing centers have been established 
in Maryland, and the examinations are offered each month on 
the second and third Saturdays. 

During the past year 1,821 Certificates of High School 
Equivalence were issued to Maryland citizens. Of this number 
854 completed the test administered by the State Department 
of Education and 967 qualified through the United States Armed 
Forces Institute examination. In the period of time which has 
elapsed since the initiation of this program, more than 15,000 
Maryland certificates have been awarded. Some sixty per cent 
of the applicants for this certificate passed the required exami- 
nation on the first attempt. 

Other Activities 

The Assistant Director continued to act also as secretary 
to the State Committee on Fulbright Scholarships. Correspond- 
ence was conducted with the adviser for this program at each of 
the colleges and universities of the State, and arrangements 
were made for meetings of the committee which gave personal 
interviews to each applicant. The institutions of higher learning 
in Maryland rominated twelve students for these scholarships 
in 1955, of whom seven were awarded grants for study in for- 
eign countries. 

Late in 1955, the work of the Assistant Director who had 
also been serving as secretary to the Governor's Commission 
to Study the Needs of Higher Education in Maryland was con- 
cluded through the publication of the commission's report. The 
following recommendations were made by the Commission : 

1. That all institutions of higher education in the State study 
and review requirements in light of the changing character of 
the high-school population and that they consider plans for 
expanding their facilities as far as possible, consistent with 
their basic policies and aims, in order to accommodate the 
expected increase in enrollment. 

2. That existing institutions continue to strengthen and improve 
their existing programs, operating at their present geograph- 
ical locations. 

3. That the establishment of community junior colleges be the 
first step of the program for meeting the demands that can- 
not be met by existing institutions. 



36 Ninetieth Annual Report 

4. That the community junior colleges be located geog:raphically 
and regionally where sufficient students would make the size 
of the school practicable and economical to operate. 

5. That semitechnical courses be developed and sponsored by 
community junior colleges as a part of the higher education 
program of the State. 

6. That the State continue to utilize the resources of privately 
controlled institutions in meeting recognized needs for trained 
personnel in specialized fields. 

7. That the new junior colleges be financed from three sources in 
accordance with present practice : State funds ; funds from the 
student's home county (or Baltimore City) ; and tuition fees. 

8. That sufficient State financial aid be given to all publicly op- 
erated institutions of higher education so that present pub- 
lic institutions and those to be established may maintain an 
effective level of operation, strengthen existing programs, and 
develop new ones required to meet emergent needs. 

9. That colleges of liberal arts be encouraged to establish or ex- 
pand programs of teacher education in full co-operation with 
the Maryland State Department of Education. 

10. That an accredited college or university in Maryland which 
can assure proper support be encouraged to add a professional 
program for training librarians. 

11. That an accredited college or university in Maryland which 
can assure proper support be encouraged to add a professional 
program for training social workers. 

12. That colleges of the State co-operate with hospitals in their 
vicinity which are preparing nurses, through provision of in- 
struction in the related sciences and academic subjects. 

13. That the professional schools already maintained in the State 
of Maryland be urged to expand consistent with good academic 
standards. 

14. That liberal arts colleges and teachers colleges consider the 
possibility of offering graduate programs in their major areas 
of study. 

15. That existing institutions proceed with due caution in adding 
new programs and fields of study. 

16. That the secondary schools intensify their efforts to identify 
and encourage those students who could go to college with 
profit to themselves and to society. 

17. That the secondary school and college intensify programs of 
counseling and strive for a closer co-ordination of secondary- 
school and college programs in the identification of aptitudes, 
achievements, interests, motivations, and financial resources. 

18. That since many patterns of education are required to meet 
the diversity of student needs both as to offerings and levels, 
institutions of higher education in Maryland be encouraged to: 

1. Examine their programs as to the diversity of offerings. 

2. Analyze their student body as to heterogeneity and range 
in abilities and objectives. 

3. Review their enrollment policies in the light of their offer- 
ings and student body. 



. Maryland State Department of Education 

19. That degree-granting- institutions of higher education be en- 
couraged to apply qualitative standards in their admissions 
practices. 

20. That all publicly supported institutions of higher education 
in Maryland be required to give reasonable priority to resi- 
dents of the State in their admissions practices. 

21. That the State establish a system of scholarship awards 
available to exceptionally worthy students: that the recipients 
of these awards be permitted to attend any accredited col- 
legiate institution within the State and to pursue any program 
of study leading to the bachelor's degree.* 

22. That a permanent Advisory Commission on Higher Education 
in Maryland be established through appointment by the Gov- 
ernor of Maryland by and with the advice of the institutions 
of higher learning. This Commission should consist of nine 
persons : The Presidents of three State institutions, one of 
whom shall be the President of the University of Maryland; 
the presidents of four independent institutions, one of whom 
shall be the President of Johns Hopkins University; the Su- 
perintendent of Schools of Baltimore City; and the State Su- 
perintendent of Schools. 



* This recommendation was adopted by a six to three vote of 
the Commission. 



38 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF INSTRUCTION 

The services of the Division of Instruction to county schools 
during the school year ending June 30, 1956, may be reported 
under seven broad groupings : 

1. Supervisory aid to county units in school organization and 
administration 

2. Assistance in curriculum development and in supervision of the 
instructional program 

3. Special studies and programs initiated and carried on by mem- 
bers of the Division 

4. Development and improvement of materials of instruction 

5. Services to school libraries 

6. Pupil personnel and parent education services 

7. Services to special education programs 

Supervisory Aid to County Units in School Organization and Administration 
This year with the inauguration of the new Principal's 
High School Organization Report form, combining the original 
Fall Report and Subject Report, much time was spent in con- 
ference with local supervisors and principals in interpreting 
the Form and its use in reviewing programs, teacher load, class 
size, and similar organizational data. The new form, although 
quite detailed and comprehensive, and involving the use of IBM 
coding for the first time, was generally well received and highly 
regarded by supervisors and principals. When properly checked, 
it affords both the local and State levels a more thorough and 
accurate picture of high school organization and offerings than 
was heretofore available. 

As in previous years, the supervisors of high school spent 
much time in the spring in going over the prelimxinary school 
organization for the following year with the supervisor and 
principal. These conferences at the request of the local super- 
visor result in better uniformity and sequence in offerings, bet- 
ter use of staff personnel, and a more critical approach generally 
to the high school program. 

Assistance in Curriculum Development and in Supervision of the 
Instructional Program 

Work in this area stresses two related services — school and 
classroom visitation and conferences, and participation in cur- 
riculum workshops— In-service programs. Some counties, namely 
Allegany, Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Cecil, Frederick, 
Harford, Kent, Montgomery, Prince George's, and Wicomico, 
are involved in long-term curriculum development, and the State 
supervisors are able to serve in a liaison capacity and occasion- 
ally as resource persons in these programs. 

Three of the smaller counties, Calvert, Charles, and St. 
Mary's, have a series of tri-county meetings each year to study 



Maryland State Department of Education 



39 



and exchange information on local problems, needs, and possi- 
ble programs. 

In addition to its annual mid-winter conference and other 
extensive curriculum development programs, Washington County 
is developing a pilot program in the use in the instructional pro- 
gram of closed-circuit television. 

Garrett County has emphasized, among other activities, a 
revision of its programs in language arts and the social studies. 
At a workshop held in the summer of 1956, the tentative draft 
of a revised social studies program, grades 1-12, was prepared. 

Physical Education 

An Elementary School Physical Education Workshop was 
organized and conducted under the auspices of the State Super- 
visor of Physical Education and Recreation in Worcester County 
June 7 and 8, 1956. About 60 teachers were in attendance. 
Forty-three of these teachers were so interested in continuing 
the initial effort to improve the program that they requested 
to be enrolled in a University Extension Course in Methods and 
Materials in Elementary School Physical Education. Dr. James 
Humphrey and Miss Martha Haverstick of the University of 
Maryland, and Miss Ada Mae Warrington, Supervisor of Physi- 
cal Education, Prince George's County, acted as consultants. 

Harford County is probably doing more experimentally with 
outdoor education than any other county. The State Supervisor 
of Physical Education has tried to stay in close touch with what 
is going on and has tried to encourage other counties to do simi- 
lar types of things. 

In Frede 'ick County, Frederick High School has incorpor- 
ated a shooting and safety firearms program that is popular with 
the students and supported by the community. 

Elementary Evaluation Program 

One of the State supervisors of curriculum has been work- 
ing with the county elementary supervisors and selected elemen- 
tary principals on an evaluation of their schools. Six elementary 
schools in different sections of the State have been selected to 
participate in this pilot program of elementary school evaluation. 
The supervisor has advised with these schools regularly as they 
have been making ready for their evaluation. To date two 
schools. Parole in Anne Arundel County and Lincoln in Prince 
George's County, have been evaluated this school year. In each 
case, fifteen selected people from the State Department of Edu- 
cation, the county board of education, plus supervisors and prin- 
cipals from the counties participating in the pilot program made 
un the committee. Using the Boston Elementary School Evalu- 
ativf^ Criteria, two days were spent in each school. The com- 



40 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



mittee worked in subcommittees during the evaluation and each 
group studied and prepared a report on the findings of the area 
in which the members had observed. These reports were com- 
bined into an over-all report for each school, setting forth cer- 
tain commendations and recommendations. 

Curriculum Bulletins 

Members of the Division of Instruction with some aid from 
county staffs continued to edit and prepare for publication the 
curriculum bulletins developed at the workshop held at Towson 
in June, 1955. The mathematics and science bulletins were 
printed and distributed among the counties. The bulletins on 
children with special needs was mimeographed and copies sent 
to each of the county school systems. The committees on the 
guidance and music programs in the public schools of the State 
continued their meetings throughout the year and brought the 
bulletins for these fields to their completion. The report de- 
scriptive of the music program, grades 1-12, was revised and 
expanded at a workshop held at Frostburg State Teachers Col- 
lege in June, 1956. 

Elementary Supervisor's Work 

A study of the activities of the State Supervisor of Elemen- 
tary Education over the past year and a comparison with the 
activities of the same supervisor eight to ten years ago show a 
gradual change in the type of work done. The State Elementary 
Supervisor, a few years ago, had more meetings with each super- 
visor, more individual conferences on the supervisory techniques 
to be used with teachers, and more direct study of the materials 
to be purchased. Perhaps the changes are due in some degree to 
the changes in the number of supervisors now employed in the 
counties and also to the addition of more special supervisors on 
many county staffs. For example, in 1945 there were 39 general 
elementary supervisors employed in the counties; this year 61 
were employed. In 1945 there were 11 special supervisors who 
had some responsibility for the elementary program in the areas 
of music, art, and physical education. This year there are 35 
or more special supervisors (the exact number is difficult to 
determine since some have responsibility for grades 1-12, others 
1-6, others for special education only) in the areas of music, 
art, speech, remedial reading, guidance, research, and library 
services. In 1945 the elementary programs in all the counties 
having more than one supervisor were co-ordinated by the county 
superintendent. During the last several years as more super- 
visors, elementary, high school, and special areas, have been 
employed, there has been a trend to have a director of instruc- 
tion who co-ordinates the total program from grade 1 through 
grade 12. Seven counties now have this organization. 

There has also been a change in the supervision of instruc- 
tion within the schools. In 1945 there were comparatively few 



Maryland State Department of Education 



41 



nonteaching principals in the elementary schools, less than 30. 
This year there are more than 400, as most schools of more than 
10 elementary teachers now have nonteaching principals who 
have not only the administrative responsibility of the school 
but also supervision of instruction. In two of the counties where 
the elementary schools are growing at unprecedented rates (Bal- 
timore and Montgomery) there is also a trend to relieve the 
principal of instructional supervision and employ a co-ordinator 
of instruction. This trend is more pronounced in Baltimore 
County since the schools are larger in this county. This co- 
ordinator is in reality the director of the instruction program 
in the school and has many responsibilities once assigned the 
county elementary supervisors. In these larger counties the 
supervisor's work has changed considerably over the years. He 
is more of a consultant in the various subjects and procedures 
and is "on call" to help the principal organize his program, 
orient new teachers, and evaluate materials; he is responsible 
for the over-all county program and is constantly involved in a 
continuous reconstruction of curriculum materials. In most 
counties he also has the responsibility of training, to some ex- 
tent, the new principals in the techniques of supervision. The 
contacts the supervisor in the larger counties has with actual 
classroom teaching are now less than formerly. 

The work of the supervisor in the smaller counties has 
changed little in some respects. He visits classrooms, knows 
all the teachers in the county, works closely with principals and 
teachers. However, even here the supervisor often is prevented 
from actual supervision as once known because of other services 
assumed by the school. Some elementary supervisors in the 
smaller counties have such responsibilities as the school lunch 
program, remedial reading in the high school, and recruitment 
of teachers. 

Special Studies and Programs Initiated and Carried On by Members 

of the Division 

Business Curricula 

Throughout the year a State Committee on Business Cur- 
ricula, consisting of members of the Division of Instruction and 
representative teachers and supervisors in this field, met to pre- 
pare three types of questionnaires to promote the gathering of 
data and evaluation of practices. One of these questionnaires 
relates to the organization and administration and content of 
business curricula. A second one is devised for the purposes of 
canvassing the judgments of selected employers. The third ques- 
tionnaire is directed at the graduates of one class and will serve 
to promote a follow-up study of this group. The three instru- 
ments will be used in local schools and counties to further evalu- 
ations by those engaged in the program. The reports from the 
twenty-three counties will be organized to give a picture of the 
p^'esent F^itua^ion in the State. They will serve as the bases for 



42 



Ninetieth Annual Kepokt 



a bulletin on business education for use in curriculum develop- 
ment and in marking the direction of revision in the years im- 
mediately ahead. 

College Potential, 1954 

One of the State high school supervisors made a study of 
the college potential of 1954 county high school graduates as 
indicated by the GED test results. On the basis of this test the 
results indicated that the typical student graduating from our 
county high schools has a slightly better than average chance 
of college success. Those who pursued the academic course, 
usually prerequisite to college attendance, attained an average 
percentile of 69, while those who actually went to college from 
that group, numbering 2,251, showed a percentile average of 76. 
These percentile ranges Vv^ould seem to assure that the academic 
course graduate going to college from a county high school has a 
considerably better than average chance for success. 

Another study dealt with an analysis of the 191 Maryland 
county high schools' organizational reports with reference to 
size, type of school organization, and staff allotment and staff 
assignments. The study showed, among other things, that the 
number of teachers beyond the State allotment, localized largely 
in three counties, just about equalled the number of teachers to 
which counties were entitled but which were not employed due 
largely to lack of classroom space. 

The Child Study Program 

This program is in its tenth year. Most of the leaders in 
the counties are now principals and teachers. When the program 
started ten years ago, all elementary and most high school super- 
visors led at least one study group. Many of the supervisors 
today have not been trained to lead groups, and many of those 
who have been trained are busy orienting new or untrained 
teachers, working on courses of study and the like. 

This year the State assisted in the payment for consultant 
service in the child study program in seven counties: Allegany, 
Anne Arundel, Cecil, Charles, Harford, Prince George's, and 
Queen Anne's. Baltimore and Montgomery counties had con- 
sultant service but did not request financial aid. 

Two leaders* rreetings were held for child study leaders, 
one in January and the second in March. These leaders were 
from the sm.ailer counties and were leading first and second- 
year groups. 

Some effort was made to encourage more interest in child 
study. Dr. Prescott met with all school board members in a 
meeting in Baltimore in November. Also, the superintendents 
had a one-week workshop at Easton, in April, with Dr. Prescott. 
With the number of new teachers in the elementary school there 



Maryland State Department of Education 



43 



is more need than ever for the school system to help them get 
information on child growth and development and the techniques 
for understanding the children in their classrooms. 

Development and Improvement of Materials of Instruction 

One of the supervisors of curriculum has been working this 
year with a committee of 10 persons consisting of elementary 
and high school teachers and supervisors in Baltimore City and 
members of the Curriculum Bureau of Baltimore City Depart- 
ment of Education, in developing Volume 24 of The Maryland 
Picture Portfolio Series entitled ''Living in Baltimore City." 
The supervisor of art in Baltimore City is drawing the pictorial 
map for the cover, and the scripts have been written by children 
and edited by teachers and supervisors. The box of individual 
pictures with separate scripts entitled Pictorial Maryland Col- 
lection will be enlarged to include a section on Baltimore City 
along with the four other sections — Western Maryland, Central 
Maryland, Southern Maryland, and Eastern Shore. The printer 
is providing this year additional folders on Baltimore City at 
$1.00 each for those persons who bought the Pictorial Maryland 
Collection in 1954 or 1955 and wish to bring it up to date. These 
new materials will be published this summer along with the 
other Maryland materials and will be delivered to the schools 
by September 1, 1956. 

The Supervisor of Curriculum has also been working with 
Baltimore City to develop a colored Kodachrome filmstrip on 
Baltimore City. This, too, will be ready for distribution to the 
schools by September 1, 1956. 

The conse rvation bulletin This Is Our Wealth is now ready 
for final editing and printing. This publication is a general book- 
let giving an overview of the entire area of conservation. The 
factual draft of the bulletin on minerals is complete, and it is 
hoped that the rewriting and the art w^ork can be done this sum- 
mer. It is also hoped that the bulletin on water can be brought 
to completion by the end of the next school year. 

The two conservation bulletins that have already been pub- 
lished and have had several printings, Maryland's Sunken 
Treasure and Our Underwater Farm, are still being ordered in 
large quantities not only in Maryland but in other states and 
the District of Columbia. 

A three-day State Audio- Visual Preview was held, to which 
the counties were invited, and the following audio-visual mate- 
rials were purchased : 25 films and one replacement film, 27 film- 
strips, 2 tape recordings, 4 records; $2,500 was spent for these 
new materials. The Film Library now consists of these ma- 
terials : 



44 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



375 films (different titles) 

222 filmstrips 
54 records or recordings 
15 tape recordings 



407 prints including several 
copies of some 
22 sets of colored slides 
8 sets of laminated pictures 



Copies of List I and II Imtructional and Professional Ma- 
terials were distributed to the local boards of education, princi- 
pals of all schools, county supervisors, teachers colleges, and 
libraries. Eighty thousand two hundred seventy-eight pieces of 
material developed by Maryland State agencies were ordered 
by local boards of education, teachers colleges, and libraries this 
year. One thousand three hundred fifty-three colored filmstrips, 
161 sets of colored slides, 2,946 Maryland Picture Portfolios, and 
110 boxes of Pictorial Maryland Collection were likewise pur- 
chased. 

Baltimore County and Anne Arundel County have finished 
the first draft of their resource books on living in their counties, 
which were written for elementary children. They have been 
trying them out in the schools and are expecting to revise and 
publish them in the near future. Baltimore County has also 
rewritten its booklet Baltimore Comity: Its History and Culture, 
the third in the series written for junior high school pupils. 
They expect to print it this coming year. 



Interest in school library programs is not new or sudden 
but is the outgrowth of a number of developments : 

1. The Language Arts program emphasis on reading skills has 
intensified the demand for more materials to read, chosen with 
the abilities and interests of the pupils in mind. 

2. Increased appropriations from boards of education enable 
schools to purchase enough library books to make it possible 
to have a library program. 

3. The exhibit o-^ new books which is lent to each county through 
the Division of Library Extension enables teachers to see new 
books before they are purchased. Pupils also see the exhibit 
and participate in the choice of ones to be purchased for their 
school. 

Thirteen counties are engaged in actively developing library 
programs in their elementary schools. They are tied in with 
Language Arts and Social Studies programs and are promoted 
by the general supervisors and the principals. 

Supervisors, principals, and teachers are taking time to : 

1. Choose books carefully and co-operatively 

2. Learn minimum, basic routines of library organization 

3. Use books in many different ways with all pupils 

4. Encourage pupils to read for profit and for pleasure 



Services To School Libraries 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



Pupils are reading more, both at home and at school, and 
are sharing in the choice of books and in organizing and operat- 
ing the libraries in their schools. 

The pattern of elementary school library service varies; 
each has been worked out by the elementary supervisors as the 
one best suited to the needs of the school in the county. 

1. Baltimore County has 35 full-time elementary school librarians 
and a county supervisor of library services 

2. Montgomery County has 3 elementary school librarians serving 
6 schools. Most of the other elementary schools in the county 
have central libraries organized and administered by P.T.A. 
library committees. There is a supervisor of library services. 

3. Prince George's County has central libraries in most of its 
large elementary schools. These are all organized and adminis- 
tered by P.T.A. library committees. There is also a supervisor 
of libraries. 

The three county school library supervisors work closely 
with their directors of instruction and with the supervisors of 
the elementary schools. In Montgomery and Prince George's 
counties they supervise the PTA library committees. The mem- 
bers of these committees have a fine professional attitude and 
their understanding of the library as a part of the school pro- 
gram is a tribute to their leadership. 

4. In one large elementary school in Wicomico County and in 
Kent County a librarian is provided. The development of the 
program in their other schools is sporadic, largely because of 
lack of space for central libraries. 

5. Worcester County is using its full time high school librarians 
to advise and work with elementary teachers, and in at least 
one elenii'-ntary school the high school librarian is giving direct 
library service to the elementary school. 

6. Allegany County has started a central library in the Mount 
Savage School, with pupils and teachers doing the organiza- 
tion and giving the service. The library is housed in the high 
school library but is maintained separately. Because this 
experiment has been a success, the plan will undoubtedly spread 
to other schools. The Cumberland Public Library has branches 
in two elementary schools. These are open part of each day 
to pupils. 

7. Charles County has the outstanding example of a large, well- 
organized, efnciently run elementary school library, without a 
librarian. The books are excellent and the library is used by 
many, both for instructional purposes and for leisure reading. 
All of the work of organization and operation is done by pupils 
and teachers. The library is well supported financially both by 
the County Board of Education and local school funds. It is 
being kept open one day a week during the summer. "The suc- 
cess of this program is due in a large measure to the leader- 
ship of Mr. Bruce Jenkins, the principal. 

The high school library at La Plata serves Grades 1-12. 



46 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



8. Anne Arundel, Cecil, Garrett, Queen Anne's, and lalbot coun- 
ties are working consistently and county-wide in the develop- 
ment of the program. Through in-service meetings with 
teachers and principals, and work with teachers and pupils in 
individual schools, they are getting more books to all pupils, 
more reading is being done, and instruction in the use of books 
is being done in the Language Arts, Social Studies, and Science 
programs. 

The State Supervisor of School and Children's Libraries 
spent most of her time this year in these 10 counties which do 
not have county library supervisors. Conferences with super- 
visors, county-wide meetings with teachers and principals, meet- 
ings with school staffs, and actual teaching of teachers and 
pupils occupied over 50 per cent of her time. 

Pupil Personnel and Parent Education Services 

The State Supervisor of Pupil Personnel visited each county 
at least once and upon request made numerous visits to some 
counties. Home visits, conferences with principals, counselors, 
teachers, pupils, and parents were included as a part of the 
schedule in many counties. Meetings with staff members, facul- 
ties, and agencies were held in many places. Many counties 
have developed the pupil personnel program so that a wide range 
of adjustment problems are referred, while a few still operate 
on improving regular attendance of pupils as the main emphasis. 

The major problems appear to be the following: 

1. Clarification of the role of pupil personnel workers in relation 
to guidance, administration, curriculum, and evaluation 

2. Understanding of the roles of other agencies so that the school 
does not tend to take over the role of the family, counselor, 
psychiatrist, welfare worker, and health nurse 

3. Co-ordination of the services of the school with the courts 

4. Preventive programs for juvenile delinquency 

5. Clarification of the definition of the "emotionally disturbed" 
child. Facilities for the diagnosis and treatment of these severe 
cases are needed 

6. Increased understanding of use and interpretation of cumula- 
tive records 

7. Improved methods and techniques for recording case histories 

8. Programs in grades 7, 8, and 9 which will more closely meet the 
needs of those who will not be graduated 

The Maryland High School Equivalence Certificate 

A questionnaire was sent in November, 1955, to 2,126 per- 
sons who had received the Maryland High School Equivalence 
Certificate within a period of 14 months. More than 900 replies 
were returned. Only 776 were recorded, as others were received 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



too late for tabulation or were returned with no answer. The 
majority of the individuals reported that they had withdrawn 
from school at the age of 16 and were in the tenth grade at the 
time of withdrawal. The reasons listed most frequently as cause 
of withdrawal v/ere: lack of interest, need for money, employ- 
ment, and entrance to Armed Services. More than half of those 
who returned the questionnaires stated that no one had talked 
with them about remaining in school. Others reported that 
principals, counselors, and teachers had advised them to stay 
in school but they were not willing to accept the advice or found 
it necessary to leave. Almost one-third of this group is enrolled 
in courses in college although the majority wanted the certificate 
in order to receive promotions in their work. Most of the per- 
sons reported they regretted withdrawing from school. These 
results were summarized and the tables were distributed to all 
secondary principals at their spring conference. Implications 
for school programs in guidance and in understanding the in- 
dividual were highlighted in the results. 

Cumulative Records 

A committee composed of all members of the Division of 
Instruction, representatives from the State Department of 
Health, a county superintendent, an assistant superintendent, a 
supervisor of high schools, a supervisor of elementary schools, 
supervisor of pupil personnel, a high school principal, and an 
elementary principal was appointed to study the possible revision 
of the permanent record cards now prescribed by the State De- 
partment of Education. This committee has met several times 
and a thorough study is being made before changes are proposed. 
Recommendations for new cards will be made to the counties for 
their study dui ing the next school year before the final adoption 
is prescribed for use. A manual of instructions for use snd 
interpretation of cards will be written for teachers. 

Parent Education 

Discussion groups to develop understanding of child growth 
and development among parents continued as a part of the par- 
ent education program. Sixteen counties participated in the 
program though the number of the groups in a countv ranged 
from one to twenty-eight. Approximately two thousand parents 
attended regular meetings in the 121 groups which were organ- 
ized in the State and another thousand attended less than half 
the meetings. The programs varied according to the needs of 
the local groups. Films, pamphlets, plays, and speakers were 
used to stimulate discussion and to supplement information 
about topics. Sharing ideas and understandings about children 
helped bring about effective participation, and members seemed 
to grow and develop in direct proportion to their participation. 
Deeper understanding of parents about themselves as well as 



48 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



their children was an outgrowth of the program. The content of 
the group discussions has contributed greatly to the kinds of 
programs presented in P.T.A. meetings. 

Experimental- programs were conducted in Anne Arundel, 
Baltimore, and Harford counties. Consultant service from the 
Institute for Child Study, University of Maryland, was furnished 
to individual groups in these counties five or more times during 
the year. The staff at the Institute is interested in discovering 
if attitudes change more often when a consultant is present or 
when a group carries on a discussion without an ''expert" pres- 
ent at meetings. Evaluation instruments which attempted to 
measure attitudes about different ways of working with and 
guiding children in the home were given to members of the ex- 
perimental groups at the beginning of the year and repeated at 
the last meeting. These ''tests" were also given to groups who 
did not work with a consultant present at their meetings. Re- 
sults of this experimental program will be evaluated so that 
plans for another year may be made. 

The greatest needs in the parent education program seem 
to be: 

1. Leadership training by parents 

2. Understanding- of parent education by principals and teachers 
(The prog-ram is not encouraged in some schools because its 
purposes are not understood.) 

3. Organizing parent work within the context of the many de- 
mands made on parents' time and the diversified interests they 
have 

4. Discovering ways of appealing to parents who need help in 
understanding children 

The State Supervisor of Pupil Personnel attended and spoke 
to 34 parent groups and P.T.A.'s during 1955-56. 

Services to Special Education Programs 

Activities in the area of special education, while all related 
to the goal of assisting the exceptional child to obtain a general 
education, may be classified as follows : 

General 

The Report of the Committee to Study Special Education 
in Maryland was completed. The Committee, which was organ- 
ized in 1951, was charged with the twofold task of 1) evaluating 
our present services to atypical children in the public schools 
and 2) recommending changes to improve these services. The 
Report will be available before the end of 1956. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



49 



A State Federation of the International Council for Excep- 
tional Children was organized in Maryland during 1955-56. Five 
local chapters (Baltimore City, Baltimore County, Montgomery 
County, Prince George's County, and Allegany County) united 
in this effort to create an organization designed to promote the 
professional growth of teachers and other leaders in the field of 
special education. 

A four-day workshop was conducted for the classroom 
teachers of the Rosewood State Training School. The workshop 
grew out of the study, made by this Department, of the educa- 
tional services offered to children admitted to Rosewood. Miss 
Margaret Neuber of the Pennsylvania State University assisted 
with this workshop. 

Services to Schools 

A committee of special education personnel from local de- 
partments of education revised The Standards, Rules, and Regu- 
lations Governing the Provision of Special Programs for Handi- 
capped Children Who Are Residents of Maryland, The revision 
was approved by the Maryland State Board of Education on 
May 30, 1956. Among the changes made are the inclusion of 
several general standards, an increase in payment to teachers 
of the homebound, the recognition of the school-to-home tele- 
phone service, provision for enrolling blind children in regular 
classes, and the lowering of teacher-pupil ratios in some special 
classes. 

Another committee of speech and hearing therapists, as- 
sisted by supervisors of special education, studied the certifica- 
tion requirements for teachers of children with speech and 
hearing defects. The committee's recommendations were incor- 
porated in new certification requirements which also were ap- 
proved by the State Board of Education on May 30, 1956. 

Throughout the year the speech and hearing therapists held 
two meetings, one at the Maryland State School for the Deaf 
in order to become familiar with the philosophy and program of 
the School and the other in the office of the State Department 
of Education to write a constitution and to plan for next year. 
These meetings afford the therapists their only opportunity (as 
a single group) for exchange of views and professional growth. 

Miss Margaret Neuber, Associate Professor of Special Edu- 
cation at the Pennsylvania State University, served as consultant 
to several county school systems in the area of teaching the men- 
tal deviate. She visited and spoke to teachers in Anne Arundel, 
Baltimore, Prince George's, Somerset, Talbot, and Worcester 
counties. As a culminating experience. Miss Neuber met with 
sunervisors and teachers from most of these counties, and from 
Washington County, in the offices of the State Department of 



50 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



Education to give direction to programs for the jducable men- 
tally retarded in the public schools. 

A bulletin, "Children with Special Needs," which grew out 
of the 1955 Towson Workshop under Miss Neuber's guidance, 
was completed and distributed to the county school personnel. 
After it has been used and evaluated, it will be revised and 
printed. 

Services to Children 

A special effort was made this year to take a thorough 
census of all handicapped children. New forms were devised 
for this purpose and statistics have been tabulated. A meeting 
on this matter (July, 1956) terminated in the decision to take 
a census, after this year, of severely handicapped children only. 
This census is authorized by Section 232 of Article 77 of the 
Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 edition). 

The number of children requiring special education facilities 
in Maryland has increased and the number of facilities in the 
public schools of the State has likewise increased. The following 
table shows the increase in some of the services in the county 
public schools from 1954-55 to 1955-56: 

195A-55 1955-56 

Number of Number of 
Services to Classes Children Classes Children 

Educable mentally retarded 59 979 79 1,355 

Trainable mentally retarded 18 171 36 349 

Orthopedically handicapped 8 72 10 88 

Brain injured* 2 15 5 50 

Hearing impaired 1 8 3 25 

Total 88 1,245 133 1,867 

* This category was not clearly differentiated from other cate- 
gories in 1954-55. 

The programs of State aid in attending special schools and 
of home and hospital instruction (in the counties) show little 
change. There were 241 and 750 children respectively in the 
programs in 1954-55, and about 250 and 750 in 1955-56. As part 
of the home instruction program, more school-to-home telephones 
have been installed. Children, parents, and teachers have been 
pleased with this service. 

In all counties great concern for correct and frequent diag- 
nosis has been shown. Only the larger counties have enough 
qualified education personnel to test individual children for men- 
tal maturity, emotional stability, and organic reading disability. 
Such test results, together with medical studies, are essential 
before correct diagnosis for some children can be made and be- 
fore educational programs can be planned. More qualified 
teachers also are needed in order to staff the classrooms and 
guide the learning activities. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



51 



Some progress has been made in these areas, especially in 
recognizing the need for special facilities, in organizing special 
classes, and in providing services. Supervisors and teachers, 
where the counties employ supervisors of special education, have 
greatly improved their programs for the educable mentally re- 
tarded and for the physically handicapped. In some other coun- 
ties, general supervisors are showing an increased concern and 
are providing additional services. All show a disposition to try 
at least a modified special program. In addition, several of the 
larger counties have been experimenting in order to learn what 
is the best way or ways to develop the brain-injured child, the 
trainable child, and the child with an organic reading disability. 

Problems 

The areas of greatest need in special education are those of 
preparing teachers, organizing more special classes for the edu- 
cable mentally retarded at both elementary and high school 
levels, formulating certification requirements for teachers of 
the mentally retarded and for teachers of the orthopedically 
handicapped, planning guidance and learning programs for chil- 
dren who are emotionally disturbed, evaluating programs for 
children with speech and/or hearing impairment, and establish- 
ing programs for some exceptional children before the age of six. 



52 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

The Division of Library Extension has completed ten years 
in the State Department of Education. Its main functions are: 
(1) to develop State-wide public and school hbrary services and 
to encourage the development of library services in the State 
hospitals and institutions and (2) to lend materials to libraries 
when thev have requests on subjects not satisfactorily covered 
in local library collections and to individuals in areas without 
public libraries. Remarkable progress has been made in the de- 
velopment of local library service and much use is being made 
of these libraries, but demands are greater than can be satisfied 
and needs for increased development are evident. Studies of 
these needs and how to meet them for the public and schools 
have been the main activities during this year. 

The Division has about 90,000 books, periodicals, and audio- 
visual materials. Sixty-six thousand four hundred forty-three 
items were lent from Julv 1, 1955. to June 30, 1956. Loans were 
made to libraries or individuals in every county. The percent- 
ages of loans follow : 

66% to county libraries 

79^ to municipal libraries 

187r to schools and colleges in counties without county libraries 

3% to individuals in counties without county libraries 

39r to State hospitals and institutions 

S% to members of the State Department of Education 

100% 

Reference requests to lend materials on subjects for adults 
showed an increase of 23 per cent. Many of these requests in- 
clude questions that take much searching in the Division's col- 
lection as well as the subject departments of the Enoch Pratt 
Free Library and other libraries through which interlibrary 
loans are m.ade for the people of the counties. One-fifth of all 
loans were made in adult nonfiction materials. 

Exhibits accounted for a fifth of all loans. The exhibits 
contained ten times as many children's books as those for adults. 
Books for children and high school youth are exhibited by the 
county boards of education so that librarians, teachers, parents, 
and children may see fine books and be encouraged to buy them 
for the school and public libraries as well as the children's own 
home libraries. Sixty per cent of all loans from the Division 
were made with books for children. Special exhibits were made 
for the Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers during their 
Summer Conference at the University of Maryland and at the 
State Convention in the Lord Baltimore Hotel. Exhibits were 
also made for the Maryland State Conference on Citizenship at 
Annapolis and the Women's Short Course for the Homemakers 
at the University of Maryland. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



53 



Public Libraries 

To date, nine counties have not established county-wide 
library service. They are Allegany, Calvert, Caroline, Carroll, 
Dorchester, Frederick, Kent, Somerset, and Worcester. Two 
new libraries were opened in these counties during the year, the 
Frostburg Free Public Library (Allegany) and the Thurmont 
Public Library (Frederick) . 



A Comparison of the Library Statistics for the 9 Counties without 
County-wide Library Systems 

19A5-Jf6 1955-56 

Book stock 96,256 131,285 

Use 236,994 389,327 

Trained librarians employed 2 4 

Operating: support $ 35,539 $ 83,996 

Fourteen counties and Baltimore City receive State aid 
for county-wide and City-wide public library systems. The coun- 
ties are : Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Cecil, Charles, Garrett, Har- 
ford, Howard, Montgomery, Prince George's, Queen Anne's, 
St. Mary's, Talbot, Washington, and Wicomico. A comparison 
for the ten-year period shows marked progress while the com- 
parison with last year shows smaller increases. 

A Comparison of the Library Statistics for the 14 Counties with 

County-wide Library Systems 

19Jf5-J,6 1955-56 

Book stock 247,806 820,909 

Use 761,351 4,299,773 

Trained Librarians employed 14 85 

Operating support $157,017 $1,130,206* 

Local operating support $157,017 $ 974,987 

* The State paid $155,219 or about one-seventh of the operat- 
ing support of these libraries. 

Eight of the counties have a half book or less per person, 
and ten added less than one tenth of a book per person last year. 
The operating income in the counties varies from 55 cents in 
Howard County to $2.02 per person in Montgomery. The Enoch 
Pratt Free Library had $2.26 per person to operate the libraries 
for Baltimore City. These amounts have been figured on the 
population figures of the 1950 census, but large increases in 
population have been estimated particularly in the counties sur- 
rounding Baltimore City and Washington. 

Durins: the year the Frostburg Free Public Library, the 
Greenbelt branch of the Prince George's County Memorial Li- 
brary, and the Brooklyn Park branch of the Anne Arundel 
County Library were opened, and three new buildings — for the 
Cecil County Library, the Takoma Park Public Library, and 
the Thurmont Public Library — were occupied. 



54 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



Maryland was honored twice at the meeting of the American 
Library Association in Philadelphia. Mr. Ralph D. Remley, 
member of the Montgomery County Library Board, received one 
of the two trustee citations for library service, July 4, 1955, the 
first time a county library trustee has been so honored anywhere 
in the country. Maryland was one of the state library agencies 
selected for a grant for the Library-Community Project. 

The Library-Community Project in Maryland 

The Division of Library Extension was one of four state 
library agencies selected by the American Library Association 
for a two-year program of experimentation and study in the 
development of informal adult education services in the public 
library. The project, known as the Library-Community Project, 
w^as made possible by a grant to the American Library Associa- 
tion from the Fund for Adult Education. The Library-Com- 
munity Project in Maryland has two aspects: (1) an intensive 
com.munity study by a pilot library to demonstrate the value of 
a sound knowledge of the community as a basis for effective 
library planning; and (2) the development of improved library 
services to adults throughout the State by a concentrated pro- 
gram of workshops, conferences, consultant services, etc., for 
public librarians. Miss Nettie B. Taylor, Supervisor of County 
and Institution Libraries, is director of the Maryland project. 
The Wicomico County Free Librarj^ is the pilot library and Mrs. 
Fred Horsley, Jr., librarian, is the leader of the pilot study. 

The project began officially in September, 1955. The first 
months were spent in talking and planning. The intervening 
months have seen the beginning of several significant activities 
and a continuous exchange of ideas and discussion of future 
plans. Many librarians and other persons in the State have con- 
tributed their ideas and snecial skills. Miss Eleanor Phinney of 
the American Library Association's Library-Communitv Project 
office, as special consultant to Maryland, has given much time to 
the proiect and every member of the consultant staff has parti- 
cipated in the programs. 

The Wicomico County study has been carried on in part by 
the Board of Library Trustees. A survey of organizations and 
groups in the county is in progress. Several studies have been 
made on present use of library services. These studies are de- 
signed to give the horary board and staff a thorough knowledge 
and deener understanding of the county as a basis for develop- 
ing effective library services for adults. The project will be com- 
pleted by September, 1957. 

Maryland's involvement in the Library-Community Project 
should be a source of stimulation and information to public li- 
braries throughout the State. One of our real resources is the 
Library-Community Project headquarters' staff whose skill and 



Maryland State Department of Education 



55 



experience are invaluable. However, Maryland public librarians 
from their experience have much to contribute to an approach 
to adult services and to ways of working with the community. 
We are also discovering other specialists in the State who are 
interested and able to help us in developing the library's adult 
education function. By working and planning together we hope 
to make this a profitable experience for Maryland librarians. 

Five American Heritage discussion groups were begun this 
year in public libraries. The American Library Association of- 
fice provided the leadership for a two-day training session for 
discussion leaders and librarians. Materials for discussion groups 
were provided through the Division of Library Extension by 
special lending agreements with other states having similar pro- 
grams. Additional discussion groups will be formed next year, 
and the leadership training program will again be offered 
through the Division of Library Extension and the American 
Library Association. 

"Adult Education — A Point of View" was the theme of a 
two-day workshop for public librarians held on March 22-23 in 
Baltimore. Miss Ruth Warncke, Director of the American Li- 
brary Association's Library-Community Project, was the con- 
sultant. About 45 librarians came together to share ideas and 
problems in a discussion of the public library's role in serving 
adults. A State planning committee of public librarians is plan- 
ning workshops for next year on : "Community Study, Program 
Planning and Use of Materials," and "Use of Educational 
Films." The Library-Community Project was explained and dis- 
cussed at meetings of the Maryland Library Association in the 
fall and spring. 

Library Development Committee 

In the fall of 1953, with the approval of the State Board 
of Education, Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., State Superintendent 
of Schools, appointed a Library Development Committee, con- 
sisting of Mrs. Lucile Horsley, Miss Esther King, Mr. George 
Moreland, Miss Eloise Pickrell, Miss Amy Winslow, Miss Helen 
Clark, Miss Mae Graham., and Miss Nettie Taylor with Mr. 
Richard Minnich as chairman. The group was asked to deter- 
mine what the pattern of public library service in Maryland 
should be and how the Division of Library Extension should 
operate in this pattern. After two years of study, with no change 
in personnel except that Mr. Moreland became chairman in the 
f«ll of 1954. the Committee made its renort to Dr. Pullen in 
December. 1955, and to the State Board of Education on Febru- 
arv 29. 1956. The Department of Education is now working on 
plans to implement the Committee's recommendations which 
follow : 

Levels of Service 

The Committee believes that there are thr^e levels of services 
and facilities desirable and needed: State, area (county or region- 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



al), and local. In addition to branches in suburban and metropoli- 
tan districts, the last-named would of necessity be divided into 
two types, A and B, because of the variation in population density. 

State Level 

At the State level the Division of Library Extension would be 
the center for leadership in planning, promoting, and helping to 
improve library service for the general population, the schools, the 
colleges, and the State institutions; and would further develop its 
leadership and consultant services. 

It was agreed that the Enoch Pratt Free Library should even- 
tually function on a contractual basis as a materials and resources 
center. It should be the center for books too infrequently needed 
or too expensive for purchase by any of the area libraries as well 
as college or State institution libraries. It would include most 
periodical and serial sets, many older titles, and expensive techni- 
cal materials. Here would be a union catalogue showing the hold- 
ings of special collections in the libraries in the State. The Enoch 
Pratt Free Library would loan books upon request to area libraries 
for local, specific, and special use. 

Area Level 

Area libraries would operate through branches and bookmo- 
biles and would be set up to serve not less than 75,000 people, with 
total public library personnel in the area on the basis of one staff 
m.ember for each 2,400 to 3,000 population and total area book 
collection of two books per capita. They would be either a county 
library or a library for a combination of two or more counties. 
They would have a book collection to enable them to meet effec- 
tively all but very special demands from local libraries. They 
would have a book collection sufficient in variety and quantity to 
become the source of materials wanted infrequently by the schools. 
State institutions and colleges, and other libraries in the area. 
Specialists would work throughout the area with branch librarians 
and the population generally. 

Local Level 

The local le' al of service, in addition to suburban and metro- 
politan branches, would be divided into two types. Type A would 
be based on the following minimum criteria, the level of which 
would increase proportionately with increasing population: 

1. That a branch library is economically sound when there 
are 3,000 or more people within a mile and a half radius. 

2. That such a branch should have a full-time professional 
librarian and part>.ime clerical assistance. 

3. That its annual circulation should be not less than 25,000. 

4. That it should be open 20 hours weekly, at least. 

5. That its basic collection should be a minimum of 6,000 
titles or two books per capita for the population served, these titles 
and books to be selected by the accepted book selection policy of 
the area library. 

6. That there should be rotating and special collections for- 
warded by the area library. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



7. That there should be daily service from the area library 
to fill special requests. 

Type B would be characterized by the following: 

1. A branch where there is a population of 3,000 within a 
radius of 10 miles or, if there is not even this minimum within 
10 miles, there should be a branch in the shopping center of a 
county. 

2. This branch should have a collection of at least two books 
per capita, the titles to be selected by the accepted book selection 
policy of the area library. 

3. The collection should be changed frequently, either wholly 
or partially. 

4. There should be close supervision of the collection, services, 
and personnel from the area library. 

5. The person in charge should be a professionally trained 
librarian. 

6. Hours of service would depend on the character of the 
location of the branch but should be regular and not less than 20 
hours weekly. 

Bookmobile Service 

Public library bookmobile service would be administered from 
the area library. Depending on the geographical size and shape 
of the area, the bookmobile service would originate either from the 
area library or from one or more of the large branches. Book- 
mobile stops should be scheduled in those places where the largest 
number of residents may be served. In some instances this might 
very well be a school, but at no time should bookmobile service be 
considered a school library service. It is always an extension of 
public library service to the people of a particular community 
who are too far distant from a stationary outlet. 

Separation of School and Public Libraries 

The Committee was in agreement that in considering library 
service in the State of Maryland it should be recognized and un- 
qualifiedly stated that there are distinct differences in function 
between school libraries and public libraries. The school library 
is an essential part of the school institution, and it operates within 
the framework of the particular school, this characteristic deter- 
mining its policies, materials, activities, and services. It is designed 
solely for youth engaged in a formal learning process and as such 
is under the guidance of a certified teacher and librarian who has 
the professional education and experience to select and use the 
special school library materials to meet the curricular needs of 
the school and of the youth who attend it. On the other hand, the 
public library is an informal and voluntary educational institution 
whose obligation is to serve all ages, thus requiring different physi- 
cal facilities, different and broader emphasis, and different and 
greater variety of educational materials. 

Conclusion 

The implementation of this plan of library service in Mary- 
land would depend on the organization of strong area libraries. 
These may well develop from existing county libraries. In some 
cases impetus may be given through temporary, specially financed 



58 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



demonstration by the Division of Library Extension. The Division 
would retain its present general book supply services until area 
libraries throughout the State were ready and able to assume such 
service. The Enoch Pratt Free Library would assume its status 
as special resources center at such time as contractual arrange- 
ments could be effected and would not necessarily wait for realiza- 
tion of other elements in the plan. 

Library Services Act 

The Library Services Act became law in June, 1956. Con- 
gress is authorized to appropriate $7,500,000 each year for the 
next five years to be used by the state hbrary extension agencies 
"to promote the further development of public library service in 
rural areas." The appropriation was smaller than authorized 
for the first year, making $40,000 available to each state. If the 
full amount can be appropriated during the next four years, 
Maryland will receive about $110,000 each year to improve 
library service in the rural areas and towns with populations 
under 10,000. Plans for the use of this money are being made. 

State Institutions 

The Division of Library Extension has the responsibility 
for the promotion of improved library service in the State- 
operated hospitals, juvenile training schools, correctional and 
other institutions. The services of the Division of Library Ex- 
tension consist of that of consultant to institution administrators 
and staff, and the lending of books and other materials for li- 
brary use. Special help is given when requested by the State 
department or institution. 

Two mental hospitals, Springfield State Hospital and Spring 
Grove State Hospital, have organized their library collections 
consisting mostly of gift books. Under the direction of a- mem- 
ber of the rehabilitation staff, ward service to patients is given 
by a group of volunteers organized by the Maryland Association 
for Mental Health. The Director of County and Institution Li- 
braries has conducted brief training sessions for the volunteer 
groups on the aims and techniques of hospital library service. 

The Montrose School for Girls reorganized the library this 
year, purchased new books, and assigned a teacher part time 
to the library program. The Division of Library Extension has 
guided the development of this project and has loaned books in 
quantity. The schcol has inaugurated a library program during 
the summer months. 

The State tuberculosis hospitals continue to be the only 
State institutions employing qualified librarians. Few of the 
institutions purchase library books regularly. Satisfactory li- 
brary service will not be achieved until there are qualified per- 
sonnel and sufficient books of frood quality to make the library 
an effective agency in the institution. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



59 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

^'Continued flexibility" in operating the vocational program 
was the major emphasis for the school year 1955-56. With the 
increased Federal appropriation of $75,000 the aim of ''further 
development" was realized. The agriculture courses included 
classes for young farmers and adults, where enrollees learned 
about new agricultural production procedures and the use of 
new fertilizers and insecticides. Industrial courses included tech- 
nological changes in production and the methods in using new 
industrial materials. 

A total of 30,044 persons were enrolled in the day and eve- 
ning classes in the State during the year 1955-56. This total 
does not include general agriculture, general home economics, 
or industrial arts. 

Agriculture 

Education in vocational agriculture reflected the many 
changes occurring in rural Maryland. Farm labor is scarce at 
all times, hence costly machinery is a necessity. Research is 
rapidly changing farming practices in growing crops and feed- 
ing animals. A realistic training program for today's agricul- 
ture, therefore, gives major consideration to new production 
practices, farm mechanics, farm accounting and finance, farm 
management and marketing, and sufficient general education to 
participate in the formulation of agricultural policy. 

The family type of farm still prevails with few exceptions. 
The number of full-time farmers is slowly decreasing, but the 
number of part-time farmers is rapidly increasing. There is a 
growing interest in training boys for occupations related to 
agriculture. 

The Future Farmers of America organization, which works 
within the general framework of vocational agriculture, has 
just experienced its best year. Our voluntary membership, in 
excess of 2,500, entitled Maryland to three American Farmers 
for the first time. Also, for the first tim^e, a Maryland boy — Ross 
Smith, from Harford County, — was designated Regional Star 
American Farmer. 

A State convention of three days was held and it was at- 
tended by over 400 members. Thirty delegates annually attend 
the National F.F.A. convention at Kansas City. A wide variety 
of activities is conducted by the various chapters to encourage 
and motivate leadership and participation in good farming prac- 
tices. The total enrollment in vocational agriculture classes for 
1956 was 3,655. 

Distributive Occupations 

In a society of advanced technology, the problems of con- 
sumption and distribution are of vital importance. The number 



60 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



of workers in distributive occupations is second only to the num- 
ber of workers in manufacturing. The distributive education 
courses in the Maryland high schools are designed to provide 
training for workers engaged directly in merchandising activi- 
ties, such as distributing to consumers, retailers, jobbers, whole- 
salers, products of farm and industry; selling services; manag- 
ing and operating; or conducting a retail, wholesale, or service 
occupation. The distributive education program has experienced 
normal growth during the past ten years. It is now considered 
an essential curriculum in the high school. 

Personnel in distributive education consists of full-time 
teacher-co-ordinators in Allegany High School, Cumberland; 
Hagerstown High School, Hagerstown; Bethesda-Chevy Chase 
High School, Bethesda; Montgomery-Blair High School, Silver 
Spring ; and Wheaton High School, Wheaton. In Baltimore City 
there are 1 full-time supervisor, 7 teacher-co-ordinators, 2 full- 
time adult teachers, and 17 part-time adult teachers. 

This year witnessed closer relationships with local advisory 
com.mittees, retail merchants' associations, associations of com- 
merce, and other trade and industrial associations. 

Most of the distributive education laboratories and class- 
rooms are well equipped. For the most part, the pupil who has 
been selected for this program has made a fine impression on the 
business man, and the performance rating on the job is most 
satisfactory. The total enrollment in distributive education for 
1956 was 3,932. 

Vocational Home Economics 

Twenty-one teachers and 483 students participated in the 
1955 summer home visitation program. Through the experience 
of working with students in their homes, the teacher obtains a 
better understanding of the student and her family, which en- 
ables the teacher to provide a more functional program in school. 
Special effort was made to have others understand the program 
through school and community exhibits of completed projects, 
reports to faculties, slides shown at school assemblies, and news- 
paper articles. 

The home economics clubs, FUTURE HOMEMAKERS OF 
AMERICA and NEW HOMEMAKERS OF AMERICA, have 
carried out many service activities for their homes, schools, and 
communities. Two Frederick County girls were elected to posi- 
tions in national organizations. Shirley Fleagle, Thurmont, was 
elected a National Vice-president of Future Homemakers of 
America and Beverly Hill, Frederick, was elected a National 
Vice-president of New Homemakers of America. The Future 
Homemakers of America spent three days developing criteria 
for evaluating their local chapters. Miss Marguerite Scruggs, 
National Adviser, U. S. Office of Education, acted as consultant. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



61 



The county home economics supervisors and teacher educa- 
tors in home economics have worked as a group to develop pro- 
cedures for studying the teacher education program in home 
economics. Dr. Margaret Alexander, Program Specialist, U. S. 
Office of Education, served as consultant. Enrollment in voca- 
tional home economics courses for 1956 was 8,919. 

Vocational Trade and Industrial Education 

Technological advances in industry and the changing pat- 
terns of industrial employment have a very definite effect upon 
many trade and industrial education programs. With the ad- 
vancement of automation in industry it is necessary to face the 
need for an expansion of vocational trade and technical training 
in the high schools. This problem is being approached through 
a re-evaluation of present programs and the inclusion of courses 
requested by industry to meet pre-employment and extension 
training needs. 

Thirty different trade curriculums are included in the total 
vocational industrial offering. The all-day trade and industrial 
education program was offered in 17 high schools in the counties 
of the State and in eight vocational schools in Baltimore City, 
the enrollment reaching an all time high of 6,464. Two of these 
schools, Mergenthaler r.nd Carver, offer technical curriculums 
in addition to trade preparatory programs. 

For the past four years, from 1951-52 to 1954-55, schools 
in the counties having trade and industrial programs have co- 
operated in an annual follow-up study of graduates and early 
school leavers from the day school vocational programs. Find- 
ings of this study show the holding power of the program has 
increased during that period. In 1952 only 39.4 per cent of the 
pupils enrolled in trade and industrial classes persisted to gradu- 
ation. In 1956, 68.7 per cent of those entering trade classes per- 
sisted to graduation ; 78.6 per cent of the graduates available for 
placement entered occupations for which they had been prepared. 

Industrial Arts 

Industrial arts education provides an excellent opportunity 
for the observation of vocational and technical competencies. 
During the school year approximately 70 per cent of the boys 
in the junior and senior high schools were able to pursue some 
kind of shop work. There is a need for the expansion of the 
program. The teacher shortage has seriously curtailed the pro- 
gram in most of the counties. In spite of this teacher shortage, 
there has been a steady improvement in the quality of instruc- 
tion in this program. The high quality of local supervision is an 
important factor in this improvement. Another factor may be 
the work-experience opportunities afforded the teachers. These 



62 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



work experiences appear to affect favorably the teaching prac- 
tices in industrial arts. Important elements of the program are : 

(1) Shop projects are of high quality, design, construction, and 
finish. 

(2) Shop management procedures give greater attention to indus- 
trial practices. 

(3) Quality control is emphasized through a system of inspection 
at pre-determined checking levels. 

(4) Shop organization employs more extensive use of mass pro- 
duction. 

Evening and Extension Classes 

The evening school and extension classes enrolled 12,737 in 
41 different occupational fields. In order to help the journeymen 
tradesmen improve trade skills and knowledges, special courses 
for journeymen carpenters, sheet metal workers, iron workers, 
steamfitters, and electricians were set up in the Baltimore area. 
Union officials co-operated with the public schools in working out 
the program. Over 700 journeymen attended these trade im- 
provement classes. 

Another unique service rendered to unions in the Baltimore 
area was a program carried on for the Brotherhood of Railroad 
Trainmen and Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Engine- 
men on ^'Understanding Railway Labor Problems." 

Assistance was given to the Baltimore District of the Na- 
tional League for Nursing in planning and conducting a work- 
shop for head nurses in hospitals. Over 300 head nurses from 
all over the State attended this workshop to learn ''How to 
Better Organize Your Department." 

There was considerable activity throughout the State in the 
training of apprentices. There were over 400 active establish- 
ments with some 1,200 veterans in training. The majority of 
the apprentices represented the construction trades, public utili- 
ties, and the printing industry. 

The evening classes for ''Supervisory Management" have 
been very active in the fields of job instruction, human relations, 
speech for management, speed reading, clear writing, and in- 
dustrial safety. The Glenn L. Martin Company asked this De- 
partment to develop a conference leadership procrram for the 
Company. Over 30 instructors were trained and pilot programs 
were conducted in the plant under the supervision of the State 
Department of Education. 

A 30-hour "Job Instructor Training Institute" was con- 
ducted at Crown, Cork and Seal Company for their plant train- 
ing supervisors. 

"Supervisory Development" programs were developed and 
conducted at the plants of the Continental Oil Company, Petro 
Chemical Division, Curtis Bay, and the Aircraft Armaments 
Company at Cockeysville. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



63 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1956, vocational re- 
habilitation services were rendered to 4,507 persons in Mary- 
land, of whom 1,174 were rehabilitated. The total cost of the 
program from both state and federal funds was $619,000. For 
the first time since the work was started in 1929, more than 
10 per cent of the state's disabled persons in need of vocational 
rehabilitation were referred (3,016 out of a total disabled popu- 
lation of approximately 30,000*) in the course of a twelve-month 
period; and the 1,174 rehabilitations represented the largest 
number of successful closures in any one year. 

These increases in number of referrals and rehabilitations 
were due largely to the reorganization of counseling services in 
Baltimore City, Baltimore County, and Harford County into a 
Metropolitan District, and to a more effective program of public 
information carried on by members of the rehabilitation staff. 

The Division maintains a central office in Baltimore City to 
administer and supervise the over-all program, and four district 
and five local offices in different parts of the State where case 
services are made available to the handicapped in their home 
communities. 

The vocational rehabilitation staff in 1956 consisted of five 
persons in administration and supervision, 26 counselors, 17 
clerical workers, and a part-time medical consultant. Training 
of staff, one of the important functions of the program, was 
accomplished through periodic staff conferences conducted by 
the State office personnel, visits of counselors to courses con- 
ducted by the federal office, and the annual Workshop at Frost- 
burg State Teachers College. 

The work of vocational rehabilitation cannot be done by 
the State Department of Education alone, since there are many 
services which disabled people must have that can be rendered 
only through other public and private agencies. Maryland is 
extremely fortunate in having such supplementary services pro- 
vided to its disabled citizens by the Maryland Tuberculosis As- 
sociation, Baltimore and Hagerstown Goodwill Industries, Balti- 
more League for Cripnled Children, Maryland Heart Associa- 
tion, Maryland School for the Blind, Maryland Workshop for the 
Blind, Hearing Society of Baltimore, Maryland School for the 
Deaf, State Industrial Accident Commission, Maryland State 
Employmert Service, departments of public welfare, State and 
county health departments, public and private hospitals, and 
public and private schools. 

Special services of another character were secured in 1956 
by vocational rehabilitation counselors through the Governor's 



* Based on case load, hospital population, census, and surveys 



64 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



Committee on Employment of the Handicapped (and its county 
units), the Johns Hopkins Hearing and Speech Center, the Heart 
Evaluation Unit of the University of Maryland, prosthetic clinics 
at the Johns Hopkins and Kernan Hospitals, the State chronic 
disease hospitals, the Community Research Association in 
Hagerstown, the OASI (Social Security) branch of the federal 
government, and several rehabilitation centers in nearby states. 

In the matter of public information, effective work was 
done through a sustaining television program, "Comeback," 
over WMAR-TV (the telecast is now in its fifth year), a film 
library which was made available to civic clubs and other groups 
throughout the State, newspaper stories about the handicapped, 
talks before numerous organizations, and information pamphlets 
distributed by the State Department of Education. 

Through an agreement between one of the State's mental 
hospitals and a private sanatorium, the Division started a pro- 
gram for training and employment of paroled mental patients 
who have difficulty in making adjustments from the sheltered 
situation of a hospital to the conditions of employment in the 
industrial world. The project makes available maintenance, in- 
termediate housing, training, and normal work situations thus 
providing a necessary bridge in the parolee's rehabilitation. The 
program has proved successful thus far and has provided a much 
needed additional agency for mental patients returning from 
hospitals to jobs in the community. It is especially significant 
in view of the results being obtained from drug therapy and 
other advanced methods of treatment. 

The Division co-operated with the Baltimore City Hospitals 
in securing approximately $5,000.00 for extension of rehabilita- 
tion facilities at the institution under the expansion grant pro- 
visions of Public Law 565, and in recommending that $100,000 
of federal funds under the Hill-Burton Act for Hospital (Con- 
struction be eai^marked for a rehabilitation unit at the Monte- 
bello State Hospital. These units will provide treatment and pre- 
vocational services to a large number of disabled persons and 
thus make them more susceptible of vocational rehabilitation. 

Since 1956 was the first complete year of operation under 
the new plan developed in keeping with provisions of Public 
Law 565, it might be well to review briefly the growth of the 
program since ith inauguration. 

Vocational Rehabilitation, a service designed to prepare dis- 
abled persons for remunerative employment, has been a part of 
Maryland's educational program since September 1, 1929. 

On June 2, 1920, the Congress of the United States enacted 
the first vocational rehabilitation act for civilian disabled; it 
provided federal funds to supplement state appronriations on 
a 50-50 basis. Maryland did not take advantage of this oppor- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



65 



tunity until the General Assembly of 1929 passed its own legis- 
lation. 

The 1920 program established by Congress was in effect a 
noble experiment, but it was based on a narrow concept of the 
problem of disability and a lack of knowledge of the methods 
necessary to rehabilitate handicapped people. It failed to estab- 
lish standards or methods for operation, and such regulations 
as resulted from it were by implication only. They led to a 
very restricted program. The Act provided for a sm.all appro- 
priation which had to be renewed every three years. 

In 1935, vocational rehabilitation was made a part of the 
permanent Social Security program, and in 1943, Congress re- 
pealed existing legislation and passed Public Law 113 which 
extended coverage to the mentally handicapped, added mainte- 
nance and physical restoration as services which miight be paid 
for from public funds, and established the principle of financing 
all administrative and supervisory costs entirely from federal 
funds, thus making it necessary for the state to advance only 
50 per cent of monies needed for case services. For the first 
time in the history of vocational rehabilitation, an independent 
federal office was established to provide research and consulta- 
tive assistance to the states. 

Further progress was made in 1954 when Congress passed 
Public Law 565 in an effort to make it possible for each state 
to determine the size and direction of its own program, and a 
more equitable system of financing did away with all 100 per 
cent federal items and established federal financial participation 
in state programs on a percentage basis in proportion to popu- 
lation. The 1954 Act provided for extensive research, training 
of personnel, establishment of rehabilitation centers, and exten- 
sion of services to severely disabled persons. 

The 1954 Congress also amended the Social Security Law 
to provide for a "disability freeze" program, and the State voca- 
tional rehabilitation division was designated to administer it. 
This joint effort of the Bureau of Old Age and Survivors Insur- 
ance and vocational rehabilitation should result in more services 
to hundreds of disabled persons not previously known to the 
State agency. 

Legislation in Maryland since 1929 has been amended and 
improved constantly to keep pace with the progress of federal 
legislation, and appropriations have done likewise. 



66 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 1 — Actual Days Schools Were Open: Opening and Closing Dates: 
Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1956 





Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 


County 


Days 


Schools 


Schools 


County 


Days 


Schools 


Schools 




Schools 


September, 


June. 




Schools 


September, 


June, 




Were Open 


1955 


1956 




Were Open 


1955 


1956 


Allegany 


182 


6 


8 


Harford 


180 


12 
6 


15 


Anne Arundel . . 


181 


8 


15 




180 


8 


Baltimore City . 


186 


6 


15 


Kent 


181 


6 


8 


Baltimore 


183 


7 


20 










Calvert 


181 


8 


13 


Montgomery . 


180 


12 


19 










Pr. George's. . 


181 


6 


15 


Caroline 


180 


6 


6 


Queen Anne's . 


180 


8 


8 


Carroll 


180 


6 


8 


St. Mary's . . . 


181 


6 


7 


Cecil 


180 


8 


14 

8 




182 


6 


1 


Charles 


181 


6 








Dorchester .... 


180 


7 


8 


Talbot 


182 


6 


8 










Washington . . 


181 


6 


8 


Frederick 


180 


7 


8 


Wicomico. . . . 


182 


6 


7 


Garrett 


182 


6 


8 


Worcester. . . . 


182 


6 


6 



TABLE 2— Fall Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Schools : Public and Non- 
public : State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1956 



Type of School 


Grand Total 


Elementary 


Secondary 


ENROLLMENT 


Total 


584,233 
482,435 
101,798 


393,276 
306,697 
86,579 


190,957 
175,738 
15,219 


Public* 


Nonpublic 


TEACHING STAFF 


Total 


21,563 
17,881 
3,682 






Public* 


10,025 


7,856 










NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 


Total 


tl,331 
t943 
t388 


1,156 
790 
366 


300 
223 
77 


Public* : 


Nonpublic 





* Includes enrollment, teaching stafT, and number of elementary schools at State Teachers Colleget. 
t Excludes duplicates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 67 



TABLE 3 — Number of Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools : 
State of Maryland : 1947-1956 



Number op Different Pupils 



Year Ending June 30 










Total 


Public* 


Nonpublic 


GRAND TOTAL 


1947 


363,103 


801,173 


61,930 


1948 


375,391 


310,149 


65,242 


1949 


390,867 


323,403 


67,464 


1950 


413,731 


343,923 


69,808 


1951 


441,005 


367,532 


73,473 


1952 


464,240 


386,724 


77,516 


1953 


495,543 


414,183 


81,360 


1954 


529.429 


443,338 


86,091 


1955 


566,900 


472,006 


94,894 


1956 


601,359 


499,561 


101,798 


total elementary 


1947 


251,821 


201,803 


50,018 


1948 


261,225 


208,505 


52,720 


1949 


273,038 


218,173 


54,865 


1950 


287,879 


230,315 


57,564 


1951 


302,040 


241,106 


60,934 




317,556 


253,081 


64,495 


1953 


339,728 


271.745 


67,983 


1954 


364,451 


291,890 


72,561 


1955 


386,103 


305,860 


80,243 


1956 


405,758 


319,179 


86,579 


TOTAL SECONDARY 


1947 


111,282 


99,370 


11,912 


1948 


114,166 


101,644 


12,522 


1949 


117,829 


105,230 


12,599 


1950 


125,852 


113,608 


12,244 


1951 


138,965 


126,426 


12,539 


1952 


146,684 


133,663 


13,021 


1953 


155,815 


142,438 


13,377 


1954 


164,978 


151,418 


13,530 


1955 


180,797 


166,146 


14,651 


1956 


195,601 


180,382 


15,219 



For basic data, see TABLES II, III, and IV. 

* Excludes duplicates among counties and Baltimore City in public schools; but includes pupils in 
elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



56 



eo »- 1 03 CO 03 



o«5 



13 -p 



00OSO50000 loo^-^i 
CO o lo CD i-H T-Hioeo 
rH eg lO in 



m 00 ■ 

eg »H ■ 



CD U5 CO 

eg 



o o 

U O. 



o Oi irt lo eg 
00 eg oc eg 

r-ieO 'iJ' t> 



00 .-I T)< ;d 00 



31 



-2 u 



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=: C D ?5 

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ca 0) J3 o 



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o 3 



a H 



Maryland State Department of Education 



69 



TABLE 5 — Program for Education of Handicapped Children in Maryland Financed with 
State Funds: Year Ending June 30, 1956 





Total 


Home and 


Hospital Instruction 


Instruction in Special 














Schools 


County 


















Pupils 


Expendi- 


Pupils 


Teachers 


Expendi- 


Pupils 


Expendi- 






tures 






tures 




tures 




2,199 


*$551,290 




353 


$86,741 


962 


$461,291 


Allegany 


53 


4,827 


51 


25 


3,627 


2 


1,200 


Anne Arundel 


104 


7,778 


100 


25 


5,743 


4 


2,035 


Baltimore City 


1,179 


*386,253 


479 


21 


34,805 


700 


349.032 


Baltimore 


361 


*72,251 


191 


52 


11,345 


170 


60,064 


Calvert 


4 


460 


4 


2 


460 






Caroline 


5 


559 


5 


3 


559 






Carroll 


22 


2,425 


20 


16 


1,525 


2 


900 


Cecil 


25 


1,959 


24 


21 


1,359 


1 


600 


Charles 


10 


936 


10 


5 


936 






Dorchester 


11 


771 


11 


7 


771 






Frederick 


29 


2,962 


28 


23 


2,362 


1 


600 


Garrett 


6 


352 


6 


3 


352 






Harford 


57 


3,182 


55 


24 


1,982 


2 


1,200 


Howard 


17 


2,350 


14 


6 


550 


3 


1,800 


Kent 


13 


938 


12 


8 


438 


1 


500 


Montgomery 


126 


33,134 


81 


47 


7,094 


45 


26,040 


Prince George's 


112 


21,561 


87 


41 


7,841 


25 


13,720 


Queen Anne's 


4 


339 


4 


2 


339 






St. Mary's 


6 


1,649 


5 


1 


1,049 


1 


600 


Somerset 


8 


405 


8 


4 


405 






Talbot 


6 


976 


5 


3 


376 


1 


600 




25 


3,397 


23 


4 


2,197 


2 


1,200 


Wicomico 


11 


1,503 


9 


6 


303 


2 


1,200 


Worcester. . . 


5 


323 


5 


4 


323 














j 



* Includes $3,258 for transportation of handicapped children to regular day school as follows: Baltimore City, 
>2,416 for 14 pupils; Baltimore, $842 for 20 pupils. Similar expenditures in equalization counties are included in the 
ninimum program. 

t Includes 7 pupils receiving instructions through a school-to-home telephone system as follows: Howard, 1; 
^ent, 2; Prince George's, 1; Washington, 2; Wicomico, 1. 

t Includes 141 county children in Baltimore City hospital schools who are distributed to the counties of their 
esidence. 

Note: These pupils are in addition to those reported in special classes in TABLE 20. 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



1.1 



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s a 



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a < 

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it 



Maryland State Department of Education 



71 



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72 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 8 — Severely Handicapped Children Attending Special Schools Outside the Maryland 
Public School System: Year Ending June 30, 1956 









Orthopedically 












Handicapped 






County 




Mentally 




Disturbed 


Other 




Total 


Retarded 


Cerebral 


Congenital 


Emotionally*! Handicapst 








Palsy 


Deformity 








296 


259 


23 


1 


9 


4 


Allegany 


2 


1 


1 










2 


2 










Baltimore City 


169 


161 


' 8 








Baltimore 


39 


34 


3 








Calvert 






























i 


1 










Cecil 


1 


1 










Charles 














Dorchester 






; 








Frederick 


1 




1 








Garrett 














Harford 


"i 


"i 










Howard 


3 


1 


"i 




"i 




Kent 


1 




1 








Montgomery 


45 


33 


5 




5 


2 


Prince George's 


25 


21 


1 




2 




Queen Anne's 














St. Mary's 


' i 










"i 
















Talbot 


- 1 


1 












2 


1 












2 


1 














... 











* In each case these children had additional mental and /or physical handicaps. 

t Includes 1 epileptic child in Baltimore Co.; 1 blind child and 1 hard of hearing child in Montgomery Co.; 
1 partially paralyzed child in St. Mary's Co. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



73 



TABLE 9 — Children Receiving Speech and Hearing Therapy: Maryland Public Schools: 

1955-56 



County 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore .... 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Number 
of 

Therapists 



Number op Children Receiving 



Grand 
Total 



5,684 

104 
501 
1,355 
1,551 



22 
"4 

.35 

100 

205 
4 
34 

674 
821 
95 



Speech Therapy 



Total 



5,453 

104 
501 
1,244 
1.551 



22 

"4 

'35 

100 

205 
4 
34 

602 
773 
95 



Hearing Therapy 



Grades 1-6 ! Grades 7-12 Total 

i 



5,363 

104 
481 
*1,244 
tl,542 



17 
' '4 
■35 

92 

205 
2 



602 
756 
87 



231 



111 



Grades 
1-6 



212 



10 



Grades 
7-12 



19 



Includes some high school pupils receiving speech therapy, 
t Includes some pupils receiving both speech and hearing therapy. 
Note: Excludes children enrolled in special classes for speech and hearing handicap. 



74 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 10 — Special Classes and Schools: Baltimore City: 
Semester Ending June 30, 1956 





Number of 


Net 


Average 


Per Cent of 


Kind op Class or School 


Classes 


Roll 


Net RoU 


Attendance 



PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED PUPILS 





30 


459 


456 


85 


6 




3 


44 


44 


82 





Deaf 


4 


45 


48 


81 







4 


50 


49 


89 







10 


186 


181 


87 







6 


88 


88 


85 


8 


Mixed* 


3 


46 


46 


89 





MENTALLY HANDICAPPED PUPILS 


Total and Average 


196 


4,090 


4,092 


79 


7 




113 


2,347 


2,280 


82 


5 


Special Center 


3 


32 


33 


85 


5 


Shop Center 


80 


1,711 


1,779 


71 


3 



SOCIALLY HANDICAPPED PUPILS 



Total and Average 


8 


86 


86 


71 


6 




4 


51 


51 


82 


1 


Bragg School 


4 


35 


35 


61 






TRAINABLE PUPILS 



Schools No. 176, 302 


6 j 61 


61 


77.5 







* Junior high school classes consisting of pupils with the following deficiencies: cardiac, 6; cerebral 
palsy, 4; hearing conservation, 2; orthopedic, 29; sight conservation, 5. 



Maryland State Department op Education 



75 



TABLE 11— Number of Pupils*: Maryland Schools for Atypical Children and 

Institutions : Fall of 1955 







NuMBEK OP Pupils 




Total 












Number 


Name and Location 










of 




Kinder- 


Ele- 






Different 




garten 


mentary 


High 


Special 


Teachers 


Barrett School for Girls, Glen Bumie 




62 






7 


Boys' Village of Maryland, Inc. Cheltenham . 




180 


is 




10 


Child Study Center, Baltimore 

Children's Guild, Baltimore 








22 


4 








10 


3 


Children's Rehabilitation Institute, 












Cockeysville 








78 


9 


Friendly School, Baltimore 








15 


3 


Garden School, Baltimore 








4 


1 


Houses of Good Shepherd (2), Baltimore. . . . 
Linwood Children's Farm, Ellicott City 




42 


35 




12 








i4 


3 


Maryland School for Blind, Baltimore 


i9 


166 


35 




29 


Dept. for Deaf 




13 






3 


Maryland School for Deaf, Frederick 


"4 


78 


44 




26 


Maryland Training School for Boys, 












Loch Raven 




230 


81 




22 


Montrose Schools for Girls, Reisterstown .... 




54 


53 




17 


Rosewood State Training School, Owings Mills 


134 


136 






12 


St Elizabeth's Home, Baltimore 




29 






2 


St Francis School of Special Education, 












Baltimore 








52 


6 


St Vincent's Infant Home, Baltimore 


t46 








3 


School of the Chimes, t iltimore 






47 


8 


Searchlight Training Center, Baltimore 








48 


6 


Twin Maples, Baltimore 








39 


4 



Note: These children are al&o shown in TABLES III and IV. 
* Figures furnished by principals of schools, 
t Includes 20 in nursery school. 



76 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 12— Total Resident Births in Maryland : 1946-1955 

Data from Division of Vital Records and Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



Total Resident Births in Maryland 



County 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 




Total State 


50,733 


56,827 


54,092 


54,048 


55,992 


61,081 


63,165 


54,523 


67,445 


69,205 


Allegany 


2,257 


2,554 


2,160 


2,009 


1,803 


1,824 


1,785 


1,729 


1,577 


1,586 


Anne Arundel . . . 


2,164 


2,474 


2,603 


2,655 


2,873 


2,969 


3,132 


3,444 


3,811 


3,840 


Baltimore City. . 


21,111 


23,992 


22,083 


21,496 


21,382 


22.630 


22,775 


22,748 


23,523 


23,291 


Baltimore 


6,140 


6,867 


6,375 


6,379 


6,661 


7,489 


7,937 


8,547 


9,057 


9,699 


Calvert 


313 


361 


395 


366 


400 


405 


427 


432 


431 


471 




387 


405 


420 


373 


417 


396 


432 


431 


405 


423 


Carroll 


860 


978 


887 


849 


771 


818 


1,019 


888 


921 


984 


Cecil 


804 


788 


790 


763 


756 


801 


901 


958 


1,054 


1,163 


Charles 


672 


686 


723 


723 


746 


782 


684 


825 


877 


937 




526 


613 


574 


555 


559 


630 


585 


597 


632 


588 


Frederick 


1,405 


1,478 


1,339 


1,377 


1,342 


1,464 


1,438 


1,430 


1,519 


1,533 


Garrett 


515 


568 


551 


541 


530 


508 


497 


467 


448 


448 


Harford 


1,245 


1,385 


1,353 


1,379 


1,419 


1,645 


1,789 


1,724 


1,855 


1,982 


Howard 


477 


565 


546 


542 


569 


597 


581 


615 


660 


698 


Kent 


295 


327 


293 


299 


313 


285 


318 


317 


354 


387 


Montgomery . . . 


3,073 


3,411 


3,600 


4,000 


4,740 


5,478 


6,113 


6,275 


6,708 


7,053 


Prince George's . 


3,804 


3,996 


4,243 


4,563 


5,508 


7,020 


7,250 


7,566 


7,687 


8,072 


Queen Anne's . . . 


269 


289 


313 


326 


311 


298 


334 


279 


335 


386 


St. Mary's 


679 


736 


781 


824 


883 


916 


881 


1,029 


1,116 


1,085 


Somerset 


414 


484 


432 


417 


436 


432 


446 


427 


477 


429 


Talbot 


363 


425 


415 


418 


427 


435 


458 


451 


431 


499 


Washington .... 


1,730 


1,989 


1,791 


1,760 


1,697 


1,714 


1,794 


1,771 


1,869 


1,967 




741 


^•75 


892 


866 


894 


980 


1,002 


1,019 


1,061 


1,094 


Worcester 


489 


581 


533 


568 


555 


565 


587 


554 


637 


590 



Maryland State Department of Education 



77 



TABLE 13— White Resident Births in Maryland : 1946-1955 

Data from Division of Vital Records and Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



White Resident Births in Maryland 



County 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


Total State 


41,401 


46,324 


42,651 


42,178 


43,599 


47,992 


50,146 


50,918 


53,204 


54,548 


Allegany 


2.221 


2,524 


2,126 


1,976 


1,769 


1,792 


1,758 


1.691 


1,540 


1,553 


Anne Arundel. . . 


1,693 


1,943 


2,020 


2,034 


2,196 


2,322 


2,467 


2,734 


3,033 


3,137 


Baltimore City. . 


15,805 


17,799 


15,414 


14,507 


14,168 


14,938 


14,989 


14.628 


14,949 


14,366 


Baltimore 


5,643 


6,328 


5,737 


5,766 


6,036 


6,932 


7,382 


7,999 


8,560 


9,209 


Calvert 


137 


156 


179 


168 


148 


160 


186 


196 


169 


190 


Caroline 


302 


310 


323 


276 


319 


300 


325 


313 


301 


311 


Carroll 


816 


930 


840 


805 


725 


778 


922 


840 


881 


912 


Cecil 


748 


735 


717 


707 


695 


737 


834 


883 


979 


1,067 


Charles 


386 


394 


405 


390 


407 


397 


387 


457 


476 


527 


Dorchester 


360 


4-! 2 


368 


324 


317 


350 


342 


324 


370 


337 


Frederick 


1,254 


1,338 


1,196 


1,233 


1,189 


1,304 


1,306 


1,282 


1,369 


1,388 


Garrett 


515 


565 


550 


541 


529 


507 


497 


466 


448 


448 


Harford 


1,133 


1,244 


1,186 


1,202 


1,241 


1,426 


1,557 


1,493 


1,625 


1,763 


Howard 


389 


477 


426 


443 


463 


480 


480 


499 


561 


582 


Kent 


214 


240 


216 


211 


231 


204 


224 


209 


258 


257 


Montgomery . . . 


2,771 


3,114 


3,289 


3,664 


4,402 


5,122 


5,794 


5,899 


6,343 


6,720 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's. . . 


3,273 


3,448 


3,605 


3,918 


4,775 


6,157 


6,430 


6,705 


6,782 


7,108 


•r96 


208 


213 


211 


200 


197 


231 


190 


226 


254 


St. Mary's 


475 


557 


564 


615 


659 


690 


675 


812 


877 


831 




256 


297 


256 


217 


240 


226 


243 


223 


264 


225 


Talbot 


235 


296 


271 


282 


290 


281 


293 


301 


270 


337 


Washington .... 


1,702 


1,950 


1,761 


1,726 


1,647 


1,684 


1,769 


1,731 


1,825 


1,925 


Wicomico 


571 


684 


663 


633 


628 


686 


733 


735 


736 


771 


Worcester 


306 


375 


326 


329 


325 


322 


322 


308 


362 


330 



78 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 14— Colored Resident Births in Maryland : 1946-1955 
Data from Division of Vital Records and Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



County 



Colored Resident Births in Maryland 





1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


Total State 


9,332 


10,503 


11,441 


11,870 


12,393 


13,089 


13,019 


13,605 


14,241 


14,657 


Allegany 


36 


30 


34 


33 


34 


32 


27 


38 


37 


33 


Anne Arundel. . . 


471 


531 


583 


621 


677 


647 


665 


710 


778 


703 


Baltimore City. . 


5,306 


6,193 


6,669 


6,989 


7,214 


7,692 


7,786 


8,120 


8,574 


8,925 




497 


539 


638 


613 


625 


557 


555 


548 


497 


490 


Calvert 


176 


205 


216 


198 


252 


245 


241 


236 


262 


281 


Caroline 


85 


95 


97 


97 


98 


96 


107 


118 


104 


112 


Carroll 


44 


48 


47 


44 


46 


40 


97 


48 


40 


72 


Cecil 


56 


53 


73 


56 


61 


64 


67 


75 


75 


96 


Charles 


286 


292 


318 


333 


339 


385 


297 


368 


401 


410 


Dorchester 


166 


201 


206 


231 


242 


280 


243 


273 


262 


251 




151 


140 


143 


144 


153 


160 


132 


148 


150 


145 


Garrett 




3 


1 




1 


1 




1 






Harford 


li2 


141 


167 


177 


178 


219 


232 


231 


230 


2i9 


Howard 


88 


88 


120 


99 


106 


117 


101 


116 


99 


116 


Kent 


81 


87 


77 


88 


82 


81 


94 


108 


96 


130 


Montgomery . . . 


302 


297 


311 


336 


338 


356 


319 


376 


365 


333 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


531 


548 


638 


645 


733 


863 


820 


861 


905 


964 


73 


81 


100 


115 


111 


101 


103 


89 


109 


132 


St. Mary's 


204 


179 


217 


209 


224 


226 


206 


217 


239 


254 


Somerset 


158 


187 


176 


200 


196 


206 


203 


204 


213 


204 


Talbot 


128 


129 


144 


136 


137 


154 


165 


150 


161 


162 


Washington .... 


28 


39 


30 


34 


50 


30 


25 


40 


44 


42 


Wicomico 


170 


191 


229 


233 


266 


294 


269 


284 


325 


323 


Worcester 


183 


206 


207 


239 


230 


243 


265 


246 


275 


260 



Maryland State Department of Education 



79 



TABLE 15 

Withdrawals* from Public Schools: Counties of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1956 













Withdrawals by 


CODEf 










County 


Total 


Transferred to 
Other Schools 


























Wl 1 W2 


W3&4 


W7 


W13 


W5 


W6 


W8 


W9 


WIO 


Wll 


W12 


W14 



elementary 



Total Counties 


20,965 


7,855 


352 


12,111 


45 


49 


165 




13 


32 


315 


27 


1 






621 


317 


15 


260 


2 


5 


5 








17 








Anne Arundel 


2 313 


890 


34 


1 326 


9 


5 


17 






1 


29 




i 




Baltimore 


3^568 


1,285 


53 


2!l42 


7 


7 


31 




2 


2 


38 


i 






Calvert 


181 


59 




117 




2 






2 






1 






Caroline 


207 


47 




157 






i 








'2 








Carroll 


402 


169 


11 


207 


1 


1 


1 






1 


11 








Cecil 


788 


274 


9 


494 




1 








2 


8 








Charles 


378 


85 


12 


260 


'2 


2 


'8 




2 


2 


5 








Dorchester 


136 


55 




77 












1 


2 


i 






Frederick 


604 


317 


' 6 


260 


'3 


'2 


"2 








14 








Garrett 


170 


46 




116 




1 










7 








Harford 


1,308 


483 


■ 9 


796 


'2 




■5 






i 


12 








Howard 


404 


69 




320 




'3 


3 








9 








Kent 


140 


45 




87 




1 


1 








6 








Montgomery 


3,618 


1,547 


ii2 


1,826 


'3 


6 


47 




*i 


is 


52 


ii 






Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's 


3,538 


1,113 


67 


2.290 


6 


8 


11 






5 


38 








172 


26 


1 


143 


1 


1 


















St. Mary's 


565 


164 


12 


380 


1 


1 


'4 








'2 


"1 






Somerset 


134 


22 




105 


2 




1 




i 


"i 


2 








Talbot 


154 


48 


' 2 


89 


2 


i 


1 




3 


2 


6 








Washington 


830 


485 


8 


264 


1 




19 






1 


40 


12 






Wicomico 


453 


199 


1 


232 


2 


'2 


7 








10 








Worcester 


281 


110 




163 


1 




1 




"i 




5 








HIGH 


Total Counties 


10,9i;7 


1,228 


107 


4,046 


274 


34 


169 


238 


3,813 


44 


443 


67 


457 


7 


Allegany 


473 


81 


6 


113 


9 


1 


8 


28 


171 


1 


20 




35 




Anne Arundel 


1,114 


89 


17 


434 


35 


2 


17 


22 


377 


3 


52 


i2 


53 


*i 


Baltimore 


2,174 


215 


22 


775 


58 


8 


60 


43 


843 


5 


65 


17 


62 


1 


Calvert 


96 




2 


33 


1 


1 






52 




1 


3 






Caroline 


136 


6 




62 


1 






i 


50 




8 




'8 




' Carroll 


336 


62 


3 


88 


4 


1 


3 


2 


149 


1 


13 


1 


8 


1 


Cecil 


351 


27 


4 


154 


5 


1 


1 


7 


124 




6 


3 


17 


2 


Charles 


230 


17 


13 


76 


4 


3 


1 


6 


80 


i 


18 


2 


9 




Dorchester 


123 


6 




22 


5 




2 


3 


48 




15 


9 


13 




Frederick 


373 


52 


' 3 


106 


6 


'3 


6 




149 


'9 


23 


2 


12 


'2 


Garrett 


122 


3 




43 




1 




2 


61 




5 




7 




Harford 


478 


83 


' '4 


211 


'9 


1 


6 


5 


126 


'2 


18 


'2 


11 




Howard 


2iy 


10 




89 


7 




4 


6 


80 




6 


2 


9 




Kent 


106 


5 




38 


1 






1 


36 


'2 


18 




5 




Montgomery 


1,278 


170 


'ii 


625 


22 


■4 


si 


31 


268 


16 


51 


'7 


39 




Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's 


1,842 


238 


8 


736 


40 


1 


8 


48 


615 




48 


1 


99 




126 


9 




61 


3 








42 




4 




7 






159 


8 


* 6 


69 


6 


'2 


3 


"7 


50 




7 




1 




Somerset 


99 


6 




32 


1 


1 


3 


3 


37 


1 


7 




8 




Talbot 


116 


2 




26 


2 


1 


2 




66 




9 


"i 


7 




Washington 


573 


117 


5 


103 


38 


2 


8 


5 


258 


2 


13 


2 


20 




Wicomico 


269 


12 




91 


16 


1 


4 


9 


97 


1 


22 




16 




Worcester 


140 


7 




59 


1 




2 


9 


34 




14 


'3 


11 





* Withdrawals who did not re-enter curing 1955-56 the school from which they withdrew, 
t Codes: Wl — Transferred — Public school in county; W6 — Armed services; 

W2 — Transferred — Nonpublic school in county; W8 — Age 16 or over; 

W3&4— Transferred— Outside county; W9— Mental; 

W7— Committed to institution; WIO— Physical; 

WIS— Death; Wll— Economic; 

W5 — Special case; W12 — Marriage; 

W14— Suspended. 



80 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 16 — Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal: 
State of Maryland : 1923-1956 



Year Ending June 30 


Average Number B^iLONGiNG Per Teacher 
AND Principal 


Total 


Elementary* 


High 


1923 


31.8 


33.4 


22.0 


1928 


30.6 


32.4 


21.9 




32.9 


34.8 


25.6 


1938 


31.5 


33.4 


25.2 


1943 


31.5 


36.3 


23.3 


1947 


29.8 


34.8 


23.1 


1948 


28.8 


34.1 


21.8 


1949 


28.0 


32.8 


21.6 


1950 


28.3 


33.3 


21.8 


1951 


28.1 


33.0 


21.9 


1952 


27.6 


32.2 


21.7 


1953 


27.5 


31.9 


21.8 


1954 


27.4 


31.5 


22.0 


1955 


26.8 


30.4 


22.0 


1956 


26.8 


30.4 


22.0 



Excludes elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



81 



TABLE 17 — Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal: 
State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1956 



County 



Average Number Belonging Per Teacher 
AND Principal 



Total 



Elementary'' 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's. . . . 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington. . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



26.8 

24.8 
26.5 
29.0 
26.6 
25.6 

23.6 
25.2 
25.1 
24.8 
25.7 

27.7 
25.1 
26.4 
23.6 
23.8 

25.3 
26.4 
23.1 
27.0 
23.9 

24.2 
26.1 
26.6 
24.5 



30.4 

27.3 
28.7 
33.6 
28.9 
29.5 

29.4 
30.3 
29.8 
28.2 
31.1 



33.5 
26.8 
30.9 
28.1 
29.5 



28.5 
29.3 
28.1 
31 .0 
27.8 

27.9 
30.0 
29.9 
29.0 



Excludes elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges 



82 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



2 S 



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83 



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84 




2 


Ninetieth Annual Report 

1 IsSP ili§§ SsJ^i SSII 

t-- ^ TP »-l ^ 






Grade 




iisp ^iiii e^sis silss 

o , ^<r. 






School Pupils in 


2 


iigji ii^^i sik^s sgg^^ 








i ispj iiii^ iife^i iijii i^ii 






1 


00 


i Plii iissi ilaji fi^ii S^ii 


1 




1 




i IPIJ gigsl Pill gigl 


Is and 47 i 


of 1951 




II 


g liSii iisig siiii ^liSs -s-- 

=^.°S.1,^.<^. too CMOS 

p -oo,_ ^.cc.. ^^^^^ 




1 






2 - : ; ; ; ; ; ; : : : : : : ; - : ; ^ • ^ 


i 


Grade 






i iSi^J i^Sii liS.^I ijs^i 


5 


Si 


3 IN Grade 




i liiij Is^iS iiiSi Egi^i 


1 


ABLE 
Schoo 




i liiij iilil ijijg lliii iiii 


'"2 if 

s 
s 


T 

Public 


1 


CO 


1 illij ppi pisi iiii 


. s 




1 




i iiip ^^isi isli 


Teachers Colleges: 
26 28 
30 30 
30 31 

1 6 
17 13 
9; ot. Mary s, 4. 
Vorcester, 49. 
Borge's, 3; Worcestei 
8 in occupational cl 


1 


1 




i ^^£^§1 ^iigi I^ISI 




.1 _ 

it 


18,917 

612,838 
39 

5,607 
433 


s of State 
25 

Garrett. 1 
3re, 305; \ 
Prince G( 
elude 1,59 






Special 
Classes 


to 


! n 






Total 
Ele- 
mentary 


i mm mMm mMM. mmM. ips. 

1 S^2g?§^ c,««ccw t^ciooco- <^^ou,o, 


* Excludes following pupils enrolled in element; 

Frostburg 166 166 

Towson 237 237 

Salisbury 204 204 

Bowie: 

Anne Arundel.... 14 14 
Prince George's . . 93 93 
t Includes 45 in elementary eighth grade: Alk 
J Includes 354 in special classes in high schools 
° Includes 16 postgraduates: Kent, 1; Montgc 
a Baltimore City— total elemenUry and specia! 
b Includes 16.5 prekindergarten pupila. 




Grand 
Total 


H sisii isiii iSJJi. iiji.i iiil 

JOg^gCO eCO30CtO»O ^r}.CO«OCC S^g^'^'** CCt>-00^ 




a 


otal State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

CarroU 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Worcester 



Maryland State Department of Education 



85 



TABLE 21 — Number and Per Cent Nonpromotions : Maryland County High 
School Pupils ; Year Ending June 30, 1956 





High School 






June Net Roll 




Per Cent 


County 








Not 










Promoted 




Total 


Promoted 


Not Promoted 






121,804 


114,525 


7,279 


6.0 


Allegany 


7,037 


6,904 


133 


1.9 




10,470 


9,917 


553 


5.3 




23,536 


21,337 


2,199 


9.3 


Calvert 


1,211 


1,151 


60 


4.9 


Caroline 


1,534 


1,473 


61 


4.0 


Carroll 


3,872 


3,707 


165 


4.3 


Cecil 


2,922 


2,690 


232 


7.9 




2,322 


2,166 


156 


6.7 




2,085 


1,972 


113 


5.4 




4,968 


4,709 


259 


5.2 


Garrett 


1,920 


1,845 


75 


3.9 




4,862* 


4,664 


198 


4.1 




2,158 


2.051 


107 


4.9 


Kent 


1,174 


1,089 


85 


7.2 


Montgomery 


16,312 


15,457 


855 


5.2 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


17,838 


16,744 


1,094 


6.1 


1,277 


1,193 


84 


6.6 


St. Mary's 


1,482 


1,332 


150 


10.1 




1,567 


1,465 


102 


6.5 


Talbot 


1,527 


1,407 


120 


7.9 




6,756 


6,616 


140 


2.1 




3,136 


2,937 


199 


6.3 


Worcester 


1,838 


1,699 


139 


7.6 



Note: Policy of promotion and nonpromotion varies in the different counties. 



86 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 22 — Causes of Nonpromotion : Maryland County Elementary Pupils*: 

Year Ending June 30, 1956 









Nttmber Not Promoted by 


oause 






p 










OOUNTY 


1 otal 


^ . 
Oent 












Not 


Not 


Personal 


Irregular 


Imma- 


AU Other 




Promoted 


Promoted 


Illness 


Attend- 


txirityt 


Causes 










ancet 






8,406 


4.1 


214 


578 


7,265 


349 


Allegany 


226 


2.7 


6 


9 


210 


1 




847 


4.6 


31 


80 


724 


12 


Baltimore 


1,496 


3.8 


29 


44 


1,213 


210 


Calvert 


152 


7.1 


5 


16 


130 


1 


Caroline 


203 


8.7 


5 


3 


192 


3 


Carroll 


173 


3.2 


4 


24 


141 


4 


Cecil 


249 


4.8 


15 


11 


219 


4 




314 


8.4 


10 


42 


260 


2 


Dorchester 


79 


2.4 


3 




76 




Frederick 


45 


0.6 


1 


19 


22 


■ 3 


Garrett 


116 


4.4 


12 


11 


90 


3 




224 


2.8 


8 


14 


202 




Howard 


91 


f.8 


4 


8 


73 


' 6 


Kent 


114 


6.3 


1 


11 


101 


1 




1,385 


3.8 


27 


47 


1,246 


65 


Prince George's 


1,234 


3.9 


18 


85 


1,127 


4 


Queen Anne's 


32 


1.7 




1 


31 




St. Mary's 


209 


6.7 


' 5 


31 


166 


' 'i 




209 


8.8 


7 


39 


149 


14 


Talbot 


330 


14.6 


10 


20 


293 


7 




87 


0.9 


2 


2 


82 


1 




406 


7.9 


8 


17 


380 


1 




185 


6.2 


3 


44 


138 





* Excludes pupils attending elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
t Irregular attendance due to unfortunaie home conditions. 
X Immaturity — social, intellectual, emotional. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



87 



TABLE 23 — Number and Per Cent of Nonpromotions in First Grade* : 
Counties of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1956 



County 


First Grade Enrollment 


Number and 


Per Cent Not Promoted 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties 


36,189 


18,806 


17,383 


2,727 


1,806 


921 


7.5 


9 


6 


5.3 


Allegany 


1,442 


734 


708 


105 


63 


42 


7.3 


8 


.6 


5.9 


Anne Arundel .... 


3,360 


1,777 


1,583 


323 


219 


104 


9.6 


12 


.3 


6.6 


Baltimore 


6,947 


3,601 


3,346 


466 


305 


161 


6.7 


8 


.5 


4.8 


Calvert 


399 


209 


190 


21 


14 


7 


5.3 


6 


.7 


3.7 


Caroline 


403 


204 


199 


52 


32 


20 


12.9 


15 


.7 


10.1 


Carroll 


900 


474 


426 


64 


46 


18 


7.1 


9 


7 


4.2 


Cecil 


1,001 


532 


469 


115 


66 


49 


11.5 


12 


4 


10.4 


Charles 


689 


356 


333 


82 


52 


30 


11.9 


14 


6 


9.0 


Dorchester 


542 


264 


278 


31 


20 


11 


5.7 


7 


6 


3.9 


Frederick 


1,236 


647 


589 


16 


11 


5 


1.3 


1 


7 


0.8 


Garrett 


450 


238 


212 


39 


25 


14 


8.7 


10 


5 


6.6 


Harford 


1,488 


763 


725 


87 


61 


26 


5.8 


8 





3.6 


Howard 


590 


316 


274 


48 


29 


19 


8.1 


9 


2 


6.9 


Kent 


319 


163 


156 


39 


23 


16 


12.2 


14 


1 


10.3 


Montgomery 


5,589 


2,915 


2,674 


476 


336 


140 


8.5 


11 


5 


5.2 


Prince George's . . . 


6,336 


3,026 


2,810 


381 


254 


127 


6.5 


8 


4 


4.5 


Queen Anne's .... 


387 


208 


179 


4 


3 


1 


1.0 


1 


4 


0.6 


St Mary's 


623 


324 


299 


72 


48 


24 


11.5 


14 


8 


8.0 


Somerset 


436 


210 


226 


53 


34 


19 


12.1 


16 


2 


8.4 


Talbot 


418 


236 


182 


71 


48 


23 


17.0 


20 


3 


12.6 


Washington 


1,653 


862 


791 


23 


17 


6 


1.4 


2 





0.7 


Wicomico 


916 


465 


451 


106 


71 


35 


11.6 


15 


3 


7.8 


Worcester 


565 


282 


283 


53 


29 


24 


9.4 


10 


3 


8.5 



Excludes pupils in first grade of elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



88 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 24— High School Graduates: State of Maryland— 1947-56 : 
by County— Year Ending June 30, 1956 



Year and County 


High School Graduates 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


BY YEAR, 1947-56 


1946-47 


10,510 


4,556 


5,954 


1947-48 


11,920 


5,390 


6,530 


1948-49 


10,519 


4,849 


5,670 


1949-50 


8,372 


4,084 


4,288 


1950-51 


12,101 


5,637 


6,464 


1951-52 


12,352 


5,741 


6,611 


1952-53 


13,356 


6,256 


7,100 


1953-54 


14,070 


6,670 


7,400 


1954-55 


15,161 


7,313 


7,848 


1955-56 


16,767 


8,019 


8.748 


BY COUNTY, 1955-56 


Total State 


16,767 


8,019 


8,748 


Allegany 


945 


450 


495 




940 


412 


528 




4,175 


1,989 


2,186 




2,218 


1,063 


1,155 


Calvert 


114 


56 


58 


Caroline 


170 


85 


85 


CarroU 


405 


194 


211 


Cecil 


335 


148 


187 


Charles 


206 


89 


117 




242 


112 


130 




553 


256 


297 


Garrett 


227 


120 


107 


Harford 


493 


238 


255 


Howard 


199 


85 


114 


Kent 


147 


80 


67 




1,728 


856 


872 




1,822 


887 


935 




143 


69 


74 


St. Mary's 


120 


52 


68 




162 


85 


77 


Talbot 


167 


75 


92 




762 


373 


389 


Wicomico 


303 


148 


155 




191 


97 


94 



♦ Includes 15 boys and 5 girls graduates of 1956 summer school, 
t Includes 32 boys and 19 girls graduates of 1956 summer school. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



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90 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



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95 



Art—Arts 
and Crafts 


o 


CO O 03 ^ ^ • CO CO O < 03 05 ^ W5 CO CO CO 00 CO ^ 
CO O O •>9' ■ 0"5cno0c0 00C<l»Or>-CO CO-^iO-^CO OrJ<Tt< 
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Music 


o 


42 ,044 

67 

2,405 
3 ,647 
8,703 
387 
639 

1,761 
1,198 
843 
687 
1,846 

766 
2,093 
929 
483 
5,234 

4,433 
369 
415 
486 
544 

2,491 
967 
718 


P3 


40,161 

63 

2 ,398 
3 ,260 
8 ,783 
353 
498 

1 ,700 
958 
849 
775 

1,735 

727 
2 ,097 
773 
515 
3,905 

5,012 
365 
415 
513 
472 

2,312 
974 
772 


Physical 
Education 


O 


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•V 00 O CO «5 O lO CO CO CO CO O O CO 05 t-~ — ' CO f'- CO CO 

t>. co^r-osiot^ r-^T— 05 o CO CO C5 05 ic cococot^co lo — 
CO CO lo — — »M T-ico ^ CO CO 


CQ 


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CO 00 cc CO -^r oo co co co ic o o — • co co « us co oo 

■^COCOlOt^ OCCQO^CSCO OO — O^CO— CDCOt>.t^iO OC^IOO 

CD CO IC CO _i ,^ ^ ^ CO CO— 00 CO — 
lO — 


Business 
Education 


O 


16,149 

26 

865 
1,216 
2,904 
140 
202 

663 
511 

343 
337 
746 

340 
612 
395 
162 
2,163 

2,266 
245 
283 
177 
193 

745 
401 
240 


n 


00 — CD 00 CO CO — OOCOCOCOCO CO 00 CO — CO coco-^oo— ocoo 

o — o 00 CO o CO CO CO — lO — r~ lo o ccooco — — co lo >o 

— CD CO 05 — i-i C<1 — CO CO — — CO 03 00 — — — CO CO CO 


Home 
Economics 


Voc.» 


o 


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tn 00 »o CO — Tji CO 00 CO 00 »o cococo —coco • • o •■>*< 
<» ■<!}<— — coo— CO 

CO 


o 

d 
O 


o 


35,002 

56 

1 ,491 
3,499 
6,426 
352 
559 

1,029 
1,047 
597 
566 
1,369 

494 
1,592 
677 
393 
3,853 

5,446 
412 
460 
628 
601 

2,146 
961 
604 




« 


39,643j 

63 

2,127 
3 ,566 
7 ,654 
283 
624 

1 ,237 
493 
375 
603 

1,319 

630 
1,659 
556 
497 
5,848 

6,525 
630 
61 
267 
481 

2,660 
1,015 

633 


Agri- 
cul- 
ture" 


m 


— CD OOCOOC — (35 COUilClCO Cit^COlCt- f O Oi — r- — lO 

lo oor^cooooo t^-T — •^'T c^r^ost^os r^oocooo ooooo 

CJO — — — CO — CO CO — — — — — — — — CO — — 

CO 


French and 
Spanisht 


o 


— 00 CO 03 »o CO -^ooooot^ — lO — co oo t^ — — coifl co o 

O — 00 CO — Ct^030i0 CD CO CO Cnos — cows CO 
O — X t -~ — — — — CO CO 

— 


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CO — 1>- 00 — oo 00 — 


Latin 


o 


C3 CO c: o — CO CO oc CO CO t->. • CO — C5 ■ co co co coco- 
co »0 CO CO ICl — IC — • C CO CO co -USCOCO COCO'rJt 
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CO 


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0> — 05 »0 CO CO U3 — CO I>- ■ t— — CO m co ■ lO CO — 'T' CO 
•^coco — »o CO — — 

CO 


Mathe- 
matics 


o 


49,084 

78 

2,617 
4,315 
10,137 
514 
626 

1,410 
1,325 
1.073 
856 
1,931 

691 
2 ,049 
805 
472 
6,339 

6,850 
605 
615 
736 
671 

2 ,601 
1 ,223 
720 


PQ 


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0-*_C3U5CD USCO^O^OOO C0_00 us -"l^ t^USCOt^CO C3COJ>. 

CO CO •* O CO CO t~» CO — 
us — 


Science 


o 


41,432 

2 ,676 
3 ,373 
9,916 

1,680 
1,327 
1 ,088 
890 
1,397 

385 
1,028 
926 
614 
4,507 

3,629 
542 
643 
747 
725 

2,517 
1 ,30:) 
48« 


pa 


45,203 

71 

3,131 
3 ,358 
10,987 
483 
680 

1,862 
1,386 
1,034 
916 
1,562 

352 
1,146 
1 ,000 

557 
6,064 

4,113 
664 
690 
767 
696 

2,912 
1 ,43 } 
509 


Social 
Studies 


o 


32,927 

53 

2,885 
1 ,986 
4,451 
477 
498 

1,159 
1,016 
745 
811 
1 ,004 

150 
777 
571 
583 
7,456 

2,776 
544 
476 
415 
531 

1,809 
1,471 

330 


pa 


32,686 

51 

3,133 
1,813 
4,234 
472 
802 

1,063 
951 
668 
779 
945 

157 
771 
525 
642 
7,525 

2,776 
551 
404 
354 
496 

1,732 
1,547 
346 


1 
o 


c 


27,327 
43 

363 
3 ,333 
7,517 

147 

822 
577 
491 
225 
1,472 

823 
1,571 
470 

262 

6,149 
115 
291 
386 
291 

1,457 

665 


« 


28,917 
45 

491 
3 ,361 
8,172j 

165 

960 
562 
517 
229 
1,618 

863 
1,674 
520 

292 

6,302 
119 
340 
453 
269 

1,482 

628 


Total 
Enrollment* 


o 


62,844 

3,504 
5,557 
12,022 
625 
803 

1,994 
1,595 
1 ,246 
1 ,09(i 
2,588 

973 
2,491 
1,13!) 

684 
8,281 

9,285 
675 
767 
806 
834 

3,459 
1 ,609 
917 


PQ 


63,693 

3,772 
5 ,327 
12,419 
640j 
803 

2,041 
1,512 
1 ,206 
1 ,079 
2,577 

1 ,0201 
2,561 
1,127 
642 
8,440 

9,273 
683 
750 
808 
767 

3,582 
1,662 
1,002 



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96 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 31— Number of Different Individuals Teaching And Number of Public High Schools 
Offering Each Subject : Counties of Maryland : Fall of 1955 





Core 


Arts and 
Crafts 


1 

j English 


Mathe- 
matics 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Business 
Educat'n 


County 


o 


o 


° rn 


t o 


o 


o 






o 


o 











f - 

















Number 
Schools 




u to 
o 






^ Si 
















XJ ^ 


Number 
Schools 
















3 S 


3-^ 3^) 3-^ 3g^ ^<i> 

1'^^ jZc/j ,2cB 


£ 

3-g 


§1 
3 S 


3 

r 


ll 
3 -g 

^ CO 


3 s 
ZH 


§1 
II 


Total Counties 


947 


132 


48 


37 


911 


169 


1,081 


190 


828 


160 


856 


189 


83 


74 


112 


98 


42 


32 


362 


126 


Allegany 


23 


9 


2 


1 


70 


11 


47 


11 


52 


11 


44 


12 


1 

7: 6 


3 


3 


2 


2 


18 


6 


Anne Arundel 


124 




5 


3 


47 


8 


104 


9 


40 


6 


70 




5 


4 


9 


7 


3 


2 


20 


6 


Baltimore 


223 


,? 


15 


9 


75 


12 


179 


20 


61 


12 


178 


2? 


7 


7 


13 


10 


6 


4 


49 


12 


Calvert 


7 


3 


2 


2 


15 


3 


15 


3 


15 


3 


10 


3 


1 


1 


2 


2 






6 


2 


Caroline 










25 


6 


23 


6 


25 


6 


24 


6 


4 


4 


2 


2 






11 


5 


CarroU 


33 


12 


3 


3 


31 


11 


46 


13 


32 


11 


41 


13 


2 


2 


7 


7 






19 


■ 9 




16 


7 


2 


2 


41 


9 


41 


9 


34 


9 


34 


9 


3 




1 


1 


3 




15 


7 


Charles 


19 


5 


2 


2 


25 


5 


28 


7 


25 


5 


26 


7 


1 


? 


4 


4 






8 


4 


Dorchester 


7 


2 


1 


1 


17 


5 


18 


5 


19 


5 


19 


5 


1 


1 


4 


3 






7 


4 


Frederick 


64 


9 


3 


2 


30 


7 


61 


9 


24 


7 


26 


9 


7 


5 


5 


5 






23 


6 


Garrett 


33 


3 


1 


1 


4 


2 


17 


3 
7 






7 


2 






3 


2 


1 


1 


7 


2 


Harford 


82 


7 
5 


5 


4 


35 


7 


62 
18 


22 


■7 


26 






'2 


8 


6 






14 


6 




17 






22 


6 


19 


6 


22 


I 


I 


1 


3 


3 






8 


3 


Kent 

Montgomery 


io 


1 


i 


1 


23 
219 




17 
135 


I 

IS 


23 
231 


4 

18 


15 
94 


4 
18 


3 
16 


3 
13 


1 
17 


1 

14 


i 
9 


': 


6 

37 


4 
10 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


''I 


19 

2 


3 


3 


75 
16 


u 

4; 


104 
15 


20 

li 


54 
16 


11 

4 


60 
10 


■1 


5 


4 


9 
5 


8 
4 


13 
1 


1 


« 

8 


11 
4 


St. Mary's 




4 






19 


19 




19 
15 


5 


19 


5 


■? 


'2 


2 


2 






6 


4 




15 


5 






13 


?! 


23 






22 


7 




1 


2 


2 






4 


3 


Talbot 


10 


2 






"i 




14 








16 


3 


2 




3 


3 






10 


3 




52 


10 


2 


2 




•47 


"! 

4 


"l 

35 i 


10 


40 


11 


6 


6 


5 


5 


1 


1 


17 


7 


Wicomico 


20 


4 


i 




15i 


41 


32 
16 


40: 


6 
4 


33 
20 


6 
4 


4 
3 


3 
3 


3 
1 


3 
1 


.. 
2 


'2 


12 


4 
4 








1 


1 


1 






"i 



























Agri- 
culture 


Industrial 
Work 


Home 
Economics 


Physical 
Education 


Art 


Music 


Driver 
Educat'n 


Library 


Guidance 


Adminis- 
tration and 
1 Supervision 


County 


Number of 
Teachers _ 
Number of 
Schools 

I Number of 
1 Teachers 


l-i 
i| 


Number of 
Teachers 


Number of 
Schools 


Number of 
Teachers 


Number of 
Schools 


Number of 
Teachers 


1 Number of 
1 Schools 


Number of 
Teachers 
Number of 
Schools 
Number of 
Teachers 


Number of 
Schools 
Number of 
Teachers 
Number of 
Schools 
Number of 
Teachers 


Number of 
Schools 


1 Number of 
Teachers 


1 Number of 
1 Schools 


Total Counties 


76 


67 


386 


162 


330 


176 


580 


190 


172 j 108 


1 

354, 186 


75 


88 


1 

201 


174 


231 


166 


442 


190 


Allegany 


2 


2 


25 


10 


20 


10 


30 


12 


7 


1 6 


20 




8 


6 


' .2 


10 


8 


8 


23 




Anne Arundel . . 
Baltimore 


3 
2 


3 
2 


32 
60 


9 
18 


26 
45 


9 
18 


33 9; 20 
85 20; 39 


8 
18 


25 
61 


20 


3' 4 
10 10 


! 10 
30 


9 
17 


14 
34 


9 
18 


27 
60 


20' 


Calvert 


2 


2 4 


2 


4 


2 


5 


3 






5 








3 


3 


3 


3 




3 


Caroline 


5 




6 


6 


7 


6 


13 


6 






5 


I 


5 




6 


6 


6 


6 


I 


6 


Carroll 


2 


: 


n 


10 


13 


10 


2o 


13 






16 13 


3 


: 


10 


10 


9 


9 


19 


12 


Cecil 


1 




7 


6 


10 


9 


19 


9 


1 




9 




2 




9 


9 


9 


9 


19 


9 


Charles 


6 




4 


4 


7 


6 


15 


7 


2 


i 


9 


? 




: 


6 


6 


4 


4 


10 


7 


Dorchester 


3 
6 




6 
10 


4 
8 


5 
11 


4 
9 


13 
32 


5 
9 


2 
5 


5 


7 
13 


4 
9 


'3 




5 

9 


5 
9 


5 

9 


5 


11 
15 


5 
9 


Garrett 


4 


2 


6 


2 


5 


2 


12 


3 


3 


2 


9 


3 




2 


2 


2 


2 








Harford 


4 


2 


17 
6 


7 


15 


7 


18 


7 


6 


5 


17 


7 


I 


6 6 




7 


-I 


14 


1 


Howard 


3 


3 


6 


7 


6 


12 


6 


1 


1 


8 


6 


3 


3 




t 


8 


6 


10 


6 


Kent 


2 


2 


6 


4 


5 


4 


9 


4 


1 


4 


4 


4 


1 




I 


4 


4 


4 




4 


Montgomery . . . 


4 


3 


70 


17 


40 


18 


85 


18 


27 


15 


38 


18 


10 


t 


23 


17 


38 


17 


87 


18 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne s . . . 


4 

3 
2 
2 


3 
3 
2 
2 


61 
4 
1 
2 


20 
4 
1 
2 


58 
5 
5 


20 
4 
5 
4 


82 
8 
9 

12 


21 
4 
6 
5 


37 
1 
1 
2 


19 
1 

2 


62 
3 
4 
7 


21 
3 
4 
6 


7 

i 
1 


12 

'2 
1 


21 
5 
4 
8 


^5 

4 

6| 


28 
8 
1 
8 


20 
4 
1 
6 


59 
6 
6 
8 


2r| 

4!- 


Talbot 


2 


2 


5 


3 


t 


3 


6 


3 






4 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


'1 


Washington .... 


6 
4 


6 
4 


28 
7 


11 


19 


11 
5 


30 
19, 


11 


7 


f 


22 
9 


11 
5 


6 
3 


5 
4 


10 
5 


9' 
5{ 


12 
6 


9 
5 


22 
11 


'i 


Worcester 


4 


3 


6 








'i 




'1 


1 




^1 




3 


4 


4 




4 


7 






1 


1 








^1 








1 






'i 


1 


1 






1 







Maryland State Department of Education 



97 



TABLE 32 

Pupils Enrolled in Various English Courses: Maryland County High Schools: 

Fall of 1955 



County 


English 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


Ungraded 


Other* 


Total Counties. . . 


28,988 


26,509 


23,116 


19,626 


15,528 


13,192 


284 


4,468 


Allegany 


1,344 


1,317 


1,342 


1,278 


1,079 


978 




261 


Anne Arundel . . 


2,656 


2,382 


1,942 


1,651 


1,315 


1,022 




372 


Baltimore 


5,746 


5,284 


4,513 


3,840 


2,762 


2,327 


i9i 


1,380 


Calvert 


312 


289 


224 


183 


140 


116 




97 


Caroline 


370 


301 


306 


245 


216 


179 




10 


Carroll 


937 


820 


709 


625 


490 


431 


25 


149 


Cecil 


781 


657 


555 


449 


338 


349 




32 


Charles 


613 


533 


434 


379 


289 


212 




49 


Dorchester .... 


378 


505 


420 


339 


290 


250 




22 


Frederick 


1,005 


1,043 


1,046 


839 


683 


568 




150 


Garrett 


433 


409 


393 


257 


274 


233 




105 


Harford 


1,262 


1,109 


874 


768 


559 


504 




147 


Howard 


506 


484 


436 


376 


268 


204 




79 


Kent 


268 


245 


245 


185 


138 


148 






Montgomery. . . 


3,951 


3,439 


2,979 


2,522 


2,034 


1,804 




580 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 


4,419 


3,890 


3,304 


2,811 


2,303 


1,925 




671 


309 


276 


249 


217 


166 


147 








357 


302 


296 


249 


204 


126 






Somerset 


41F, 


340 


305 


217 


189 


162 






Talbot 


350 


336 


317 


253 


176 


187 






Washington . . . 


1,346 


1,512 


1,306 


1,150 


938 


801 


19 


164 




781 


670 


592 


514 


423 


313 




144 


Worcester 


449 


366 


329 


279 


254 


206 


49 


56 



* Includes 1,936 taking Journalism; 1,586 taking Speech; and 946 taking Dramatics. 



98 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



o 
o 

5 

o 



Psychology 


2,326 


closes -t- 

W 00 • U5 


oo5£>eo«oc^i 

(N M 


• -eo -00 

• • w -eo 

•CO 


t> 00 • 00 Oi 

1-I03 


05 <N 
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Geographyi 


00 
00 


.t>Tj< . . 

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• <N • • 


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• ■ (N 


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Economic 
Geography 


2,024 


O • ;0 tH ■ 

n -iNeo • 


ON -Olrt 


• iot>eo»H 

■1-1 CO 


t> o 1-1 00 • 

(N'<!f coco • 


OtHiH 


Economics 

and 
Sociology 


1,127 


.(35^ • • 


. . -O • 


... -00 

. . . 




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• •« 


Economics 

and 
Consumer 
Education 


o 

00 
eo 








lONO>i-l ■ 
CsJ 1-1 iH CO • 


■o • 
•o • 


Problems 
of 

Democracy 


9,634 


Ol CJ X rH «5 
lO rH r-l r-i 


(N t~ m CO eo 

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eouteooocc 
CO o Tf oa 


1,672 
156 
114 
118 
171 


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Maryland State Depabtment of Education 



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100 Ninetieth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



101 



TABLE 36 — Pupils Enrolled in the Foreign Languages: Maryland County High 

Schools : Fall of 1955 



County 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties 


2 496 


3 229 


2 498 


3 172 


1 879 


1 789 


Allegany 


317 


376 


64 


90 


80 


82 


Anne Arundel 


94 


159 


431 


494 


270 


323 




359 


440 


463 


477 


341 


312 


Calvert 


25 


31 


23 


35 






Caroline 


30 


36 


9 


16 






Carroll 


53 


53 


79 


104 






Cecil 


46 


48 


32 


58 


28 


20 




17 


13 


65 


98 








27 


53 


60 


90 






Frederick 


176 


217 


73 


107 






Garrett 






48 


59 


16 


12 


Harford 


7i 


102 


150 


165 






Howard 


13 


21 


21 


21 






Kent 


31 


47 


15 


29 


8 


i4 




553 


739 


414 


689 


433 


439 


Prince George's 


269 


264 


274 


285 


596 


412 


Queen Anne's 






31 


64 


21 


27 


St. Mary's 


52 


52 


21 


11 








23 


23 


14 


26 






Talbot 


49 


62 


58 


55 








111 


226 


108 


133 


62 


101 


Wicomico 


148 


226 


30 


43 








32 


41 


15 


23 


24 


47 



102 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 37 — Pupils Enrolled in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home Economics : 
Maryland County High Schools : Fall of 1955 



County 


Industkial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Arts 


Education 


General 


Vocational 


General 


Vocational 


Total Counties 


38,441 


2,970 


602 


3,249 


35,126 


2,952 


Allp<y!^n V 


2,037 


155 


45 


43 


1,491 


480 




3,213 


412 


92 


81 


3,511 


52 




7,612 


297 


27 


101 


6,527 


23 


Calvert 


283 






81 


352 


110 


Caroline 


535 




61 


128 


559 


40 


Carroll 


1,221 


29 




76 


1.029 


74 


Cecil 


493 






45 


1,047 


32 


Charles 


375 




63 


252 


597 


87 




604 






145 


566 


63 


Frederick 


1,364 




ii 


299 


1,369 


87 


Garrett 


630 






229 


494 


154 


Harford 


1,639 


35 




177 


1,592 




Howard 


556 






192 


678 


37 


Kent 


497 






75 


393 


39 




5.745 


6i9 


"ei 


136 


3,853 


328 


Queen Anne's 


6,187 


1,202 


28 


146 


5,456 


914 


530 






180 


412 


122 


St. Mary's 


61 




36 


133 


460 


62 


Somerset 


267 




70 


31 


528 




Talbot 


481 






107 


501 




Washington 


2.456 


221 


40 


264 


2,146 


207 




1,017 






181 


961 




Worcester 


638 




'88 


147 


604 


41 



Maryland State Department of Education 



103 



TABLE 38 — Pupils Enrolled in Music, Art, and Physical Education: Maryland 
County High Schools : Fall of 1955 



County 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties 


45,739 


47,823 


26,660 


25,163 


56,722 


52,744 


Allegany 


2,911 


3,114 


1,293 


1,241 


2,477 


2.205 


Anne Arundel 


4,062 


4,478 


2,784 


2,609 


5,369 


5,135 


Baltimore 


10,217 


9,944 


8,490 


7,804 


12,362 


11,952 


Calvert 


354 


387 


212 


44 


545 


506 




597 


837 






771 


753 


Carroll 


2,128 


2,085 


502 


506 


1,870 


1,788 


Cecil 


1,012 


1,294 


420 


256 


1,280 


1,150 


Charles 


950 


894 


464 


290 


1,027 


931 


Dorchester 


827 


759 


364 


385 


1,036 


1,062 


Frederick 


2,005 


2,192 


1,055 


1,061 


2,399 


2,232 


Garrett 


892 


1,019 


584 


489 


829 


677 


Harford 


2,194 


2,181 


1,161 


1,129 


2,157 


1,905 


Howard 


844 


953 


38 


55 


1,009 


900 


Kent 


616 


598 


217 


174 


603 


537 


Montgomery 


4,149 


4,532 


2,488 


2,735 


7,116 


6,497 


Prince George's 


5,462 


5,706 


4,379 


4,135 


8,065 


7,379 


Queen Anne's 


365 


369 


53 


43 


668 


616 


St. Mary's 


448 


476 


142 


156 


710 


673 


Somerset ... 


539 


589 


37 


43 


749 


732 


Talbot 


534 


555 


58 


68 


572 


641 




2,851 


3,153 


1,067 


1,053 


2,952 


2.571 


Wicomico 


991 


977 


759 


842 


1,269 


1.134 


Worcester 


791 


731 


1 93 


45 


887 


768 



104 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



105 



TABLE 40 — Pupils Enrolled in Driver Education and Training: Maryland County 

High Schools : Fall of 1955 



County 


Driver Education 


Driver Training 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties 


414 


180 


234 


5,174 


2,308 


2,866 




23 


8 


15 


428 


188 


240 


Anne Arundel 








253 


86 


167 


Baltimore 


120 


40 


80 


833 


406 


427 


Calvert 






















129 


'55 


"74 


Carroll 








51 


17 


34 


Cecil 








127 


38 


89 


Charles 














Dorchester 








u6 


66 


"74 


Frederick 














Garrett 








70 


28 


42 


Harford 


252 


122 


130 


469 


211 


258 


Howard 








165 


65 


100 


Kent 








138 


64 


74 










491 


187 


304 


Prince George's 


1 




1 


748 


353 


395 


Queen Anne's 














St. Mary's . . 








"45 


36 


■ 9 


Somerset 








9 


4 


5 


Talbot 








110 


49 


61 


Washington 


18 


10 


8 


258 


95 


163 










501 


263 


238 


Worcester 








209 


97 


112 



Driver Education — classroom instruction. 
Driver Training — behind-the-wheel instruction. 



106 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 41 — Pupils Reported as Members of Glee or Choral Clubs, Orchestras, or 
Bands: Maryland County High Schools: Fall of 1955 



County 


Glee 


OR Chorax. 




Orchestras, Bands 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties 


12,181 


3,744 


8,437 


10,152 


6,795 


3,357 


Allegany 


1,069 


337 


732 


735 


437 


298 


Anne Arundel 


1,202 


305 


897 


508 


410 


98 


Baltimore 


2,748 


943 


1,805 


1,483 


1,050 


433 


Calvert 


119 


29 


90 


134 


85 


49 


Caroline 


243 


38 


205 


178 


99 


79 


Carroll 


182 


94 


88 


448 


256 


192 


Cecil 


440 


101 


339 


282 


151 


131 


Charles 


126 


44 


82 


273 


206 


67 


Dorchester 


108 


59 


49 


135 


91 


44 


Frederick 


595 


196 


399 


496 


311 


185 


Garrett 


287 


53 


234 


448 


246 


202 


Harford 


325 


99 


226 


581 


318 


263 


Howard 








127 


93 


34 


Kent 


229 


93 


i36 


23 


19 


4 


Montgomery 


1.192 


281 


911 


1,455 


1,072 


383 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


1,057 


319 


738 


1,422 


967 


455 


109 


29 


80 


191 


104 


87 


St. Mary's 


56 


16 


40 


38 


17 


21 


Somerset 


228 


69 


159 








Talbot 


134 


65 


69 


iio 


67 


43 




1,448 


480 


968 


509 


362 


147 




53 


13 


40 


360 


276 


84 


Worcester 


231 


81 


150 


216 


158 


58 



Maryland State Department of Education 



107 



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12; 



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108 



Ninetieth Annual Report 




Maryland State Department of Education 



109 



TABLE 44 — Number of Certificates Issued to Maryland Teachers, Principals, 
Administrative and Supervisory Personnel in the County Schools by the 
Maryland State Department of Education: 1953-54, 1954-55, 1955-56 



Grade of Certificate 



Number of Certificates Issued 



1953-54 



1954-55 



Total Number of Certificates Issued . 



Administration and Supervision 

Administration and Supervision 

High School Supervision 

Elementary Supervision 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Supervisor of Special Subjects 

Supervisor or Director in Special Areas 
Visiting Teacher 



County Librarian . 



High School 

Principal 

Academic 

Special 

Vocational 

Junior High School 

Nonpublic 

Permits — Foreign Exchange Teachers . 



Elementary 

Principal 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education . . 

Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 

Bachelor of Science .'or Kindergarten Teaching. 

Advanced First Grade 

Nonpublic Bachelor of Science 



Emergency Certificates 
Degree 

High School 

Elementary School . 

Nondegree 

High School 

Elementary School . 



Provisional Certificates 

Substitute Teachers' Certificates 

Degree 

Nondegree 



3.112 



4 

364 
239 
70 
78 
47 
1 



46 
552 
44 
49 
15 
18 



325 
691 



31 

377 



59 



3.679 



11 



16 
452 
333 
40 
90 
51 



48 
648 
52 
58 
5 
28 



479 
740 



23 
460 



44 



110 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



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113 



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114 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 49 

Number and Per Cent of New Teachers: Maryland Public Schools: 1950-56 







New to Counties 


Increase 


Number New to County Who Were 










In 
Number 






Experienced 










of 












Year 


Total 
Teachers 


Number 


Per Cent 


Teaching 
Positions 
October 
to 

October 


Inex- 
perienced 


Sub- 
stitutes 

and 
Unknown 


But New 
to 
State 


In Coun- 
ties But 

Not 
Teaching 
Preced- 
ing Year 


From 
Another 
County 



GRAND TOTAL 



1949-50 


11,344 


2,000 


17.6 


764 


1,025 


29 


605 


341 


130 


1950-51 


12,226 


2,411 


19.7 


870 


1,379 


37 


659 


336 


164 


1951-52 


13,153 


2,648 


20.1 


953 


1,353 


81 


843 


371 


264 


1952-53 


14,235 


2,744 


19.3 


890 


1,430 


6 


940 


368 


252 


1953-54 


15,274 


3,264 


21.4 


1,039 


1,579 


44 


1,068 


573 


248 


1954-55 


16,401 


3,586 


21.9 


1,354 


1,709 


40 


1,336 


501 


314 


1955-56 


17,461 


3,531 


20.2 


1,081 


1,716 


* 


1,360 


455 


299 


TOTAL ELEMENTARY 


1949-50 


6,340 


1,075 


16.9 


442 


471 


21 


347 


236 


69 


1950-51 


6,670 


1,215 


18.2 


329 


599 


20 


370 


226 


88 


1951-52 


7,214 


1,448 


20.1 


558 


669 


46 


465 


268 


131 


1952-53 


7,992 


1,566 


19.6 


586 


762 


2 


567 


235 


124 


1953-54 


8,630 


1,961 


22.7 


638 


908 


32 


652 


369 


123 


1954-55 


9,181 


2,037 


22.2 


782 


950 


24 


785 


278 


139 


1955-56 


9 668 


1,919 


19.8 


498 


889 


* 


747 


283 


131 



TOTAL HIGH 



1949-50 


5,004 


925 


18.5 


322 


554 


8 


258 


105 


61 


1950-51 


5,556 


1.196 


21.5 


541 


780 


17 


289 


110 


76 


1951-52 


5,939 


1,200 


20.2 


395 


684 


35 


378 


103 


133 


1952-53 


6,243 


1,178 


18.9 


304 


668 


4 


373 


133 


128 


1953-54 


6,644 


1,303 


19.6 


401 


671 


12 


416 


204 


125 




7,220 


1,549 


21.5 


572 


759 


16 


551 


223 


175 


1955-56 


7,793 


1,612 


20.7 


583 


827 


* 


613 


172 


168 



* Teachers who?e status could not be determined are prorated according to those teachers about whom such ii 
formation was available. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



115 



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116 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



117 



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118 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 53 



Certificate Status of Elementary Teachers* New to Maryland County Public Schools : 1955-5 



l^UUN 1 I 


1 oral 


Regular 


Emergency 


Substitute 


Pro- 
vision- 
al 


iNO. 

ficat( 


B.S. 


jr. 
H.S. 


H.S. 


A 1st. 


1st. 


2nd. 


Degree 


XT 

on- 
degree 


Degree 


i\on- 
degree 


Total Counties .... 


1,603 


630 


9 


9 


3 


1 




533 


315 


5 


11 


2 


i 




100. 


39.3 


0.6 


0.6 


0.2 


0.1 


0.0 


33.2 


19.6 


0.3 


0.7 


0. 1 




Allegany 


31 


21 












5 


4 










Anne Arundel . . . 


189 


61 




i 








63 


53 




'2 






Baltimore 


321 


157 












91 


63 










Calvert 


13 


9 






i 






3 












Caroline 


7 


3 






1 






1 


"2 










Carroll 


40 


9 




1 








8 


17 




2 






Cecil 


47 


19 




1 








14 


9 




2 






Charles 


19 


8 












6 


2 










Dorchester 


10 


4 












1 


5 










Frederick 


39 


14 


"i 










7 


13 










Garrett 


12 


5 


1 










3 


3 










Harford 


87 


47 


1 


'2 








19 


14 










Howard 


31 


8 




2 








8 


6 










Kent 


8 


2 












2 


4 










Montgomery .... 


327 


91 


'2 


'2 








157 


50 




'4 






Prince George's. . 


277 


96 


1 






1 




113 


49 




1 


1 






4 


3 












1 












St. Mary's 


30 


9 












4 


'7 










Somerset 


9 


8 












1 












Talbot 


10 


6 












3 












Washington 


50 


2i 












16 


11 










Wicomico 


27 


17 


'3 










5 


2 












15 


12 












2 


1 











* All figures exclude transfers between and within counties. 

t "No certificate" includes teachers who stayed in service a short time, making certification impractical. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



119 



TABLE 54 

Certificate Status of High School Teachers* New to County Public Schools: 1955-56 



County 


Total 


Regular 


Elementary 


Emergency 


Substitute 


Pro- 
visional 


No 
Certifi 
catet 


HA. 

HS.Voc. 


Jr.H.S. 




Non- 
deg ree 




Non- 
degree 




Non- 
degree 


;al Counties 


1,362 


684 


89 


37 


1 


407 


38 


19 


16 


1 


70 


Cent 


100.0 


50.2 


6.5 


2.7 


0.1 


29.9 


2.8 


1.4 


1.2 


0.1 


5.1 




30 


15 


5 


3 




4 


1 


1 










135 


66 


7 


5 




49 


3 


4 


i 








230 


129 


33 


1 




47 


6 


3 


3 






;alvert 


22 


12 


2 






7 






1 








18 


14 








4 












-arroU 


60 


17 


2 


5 




19 


3 


1 


2 




11 


ecil 


52 


25 


1 






20 


4 




2 






haries 


18 


12 








6 












'orcheater 


12 


6 








4 


2 










rederick 


48 


14 


3 


4 




17 


2 


2 






6 


arrett 


23 


12 


1 


2 




8 












arford 


84 


45 


2 


3 




26 


2 


2 






3 




36 


20 








13 










3 




17 


10 








4 




2 






1 


[ontgomery 


209 


108 


'4 


5 




66 


4 


3 






19 


rince George's. . . . 


189 


101 


16 


4 




57 


3 




2 




6 


ueen Anne's 


19 


9 








6 


1 








3 


Mary's 


26 


9 








10 






i 




5 


)merset 


11 


7 


2 








2 










albot 


21 


5 


1 






12 


1 




i 




i 


'ashington 


41 


23 


2 


1 




9 


2 




2 




2 


/icomico 


46 


21 


6 


3 




11 


2 




1 




2 


orcester 


15 


4 


2 


1 




8 













All figures exclude transfers between and within counties. 

"No certificate" includes teachers who stayed in service a short time, making certification impractical. 




120 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 55— Number and Per Cent of Schools, Teachers, Pupils: One-Teacher* 
Elementary Schools : Counties of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1956 





One-Teacher Elementary Schools* 


\-/\J U IN 1 X 


Number of One- 
Teacher Schools 


Teachers in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Pupils in One- 
Teacher Schools 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total Counties 


24 


3.7 


24 


0.3 


595 


0.3 


Allegany 






Anne Arundel 














Baltimore 














Calvert 


' i 


i'.i 


" i 


i'.3 


ie 


6.7 


Caroline 










Carroll 














Cecil 














Charles 














Dorchester 


io 


S8.5 


io 


9.4 


216 


6'. 5 


Frederick 


3 


8.3 


3 


1.4 


101 
64 


1.4 


Garrett 


2 


10.5 


2 


2.0 


2.4 


Harford 












Howard 














Kent 


■ 2 


14 .3 


' 2 


3 ".3 


64 


3.6 


Montgomery 










Prince George's 

Quen Anne's 














St. Mary's 


' i 


5.5 


' i 


i.6 


26 


6.8 


Somerset 


2 


10.5 


2 


2.3 


49 


2.1 


Talbot 


3 


17.6 


3 


3.7 


59 


2.6 


























Worcester 





























Schools having a one-teacher organization of grades one to five or more. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



121 



TABLE 56 — Decrease in Teachers in One-Teacher Elementary Schools*: 
Counties of Maryland : 1923-1956 







County Elementary School Teachers 




Year Ending 




In One-Teacher Schools 




June 30 


Total 












Number 


Per Cent 


1923 




3,775 


1,496 


39 6 


1928 




3,805 


1,206 


31.7 


1933 




3,666 


740 


20.2 


1938 




3,628 


558 


15.4 


1943 




3,270 


275 


8.4 


1947 




3,414 


174 


5.1 


1948 




3,591 


161 


4.5 


1949 




3,817 


155 


4.1 


1950 




4,087 


127 


3.1 


1951 




4,359 


103 


2.4 


1952 




4,860 


75 


1.5 


1953 




5,401 


59 


1.1 


1954 




5,984 


50 


0.8 


1955 




6,661 


30 


0.5 


1956 




7,075 


24 


0.3 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization of grades one to five or more. 



122 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 57— Number and Per Cent of Men Teachers: 
State of Maryland : 1 923- 1 956 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Number and Per Cent Men Teachers 


Total 


Elementary 


High 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1923 


1,048 


14.2 


591 


9.3 


457 


43 3 


1928 


1,136 


13.8 


574 


8.4 


562 


39.6 


1933 


1,347 


16.1 


617 


9.4 


730 


41.4 


1938 


1,613 


18.6 


766 


11.5 


847 


41.8 


1943 


1,464 


16.6 


561 


8.8 


903 


36.8 


1947 


1,695 


17.8 


310 


5.7 


1,385 


34.0 


1948 


2,018 


19.9 


392 


6.8 


1,626 


36.7 


1949 


2,173 


19.9 


422 


6.7 


1,751 


37.7 


1950 


2,498 


21.7 


515 


7.9 


1,983 


39.8 


1951 


2,965 


23.9 


604 


8.8 


2,361 


42.7 


1952 


3,263 


24.5 


709 


9.5 


2,554 


43.3 


1953 


3,628 


25.3 


822 


10.2 


2,806 


44.9 


1954 


3,885 


25.1 


866 


9.8 


C,019 


45.4 


1955 


4,406 


26.2 


1,019 


10.6 


3,387 


46.7 


1956 


4,818 


27.0 


1,098 


11.0 


3,720 


47.3 



Maryland State Department of Education 



123 



ABLE 58 — Number of Puplic Schools: Number of Teachers and Principals: State of 
Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1956 



Number of 
Teachers 

AND 

Prixcipals 


All Schools 


Allegany 


a 

3 
< 

B 
■< 


Baltimore City 


Baltimore County 


Calvert 


Caroline 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Charles 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


Garrett ! 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent i 


Montgomery 


Prince George's 


Queen Anne's 


St. Marv's 


Somerset 


Talbot 


Washington 


Wicomico 


Worcester 


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 




786 

36 
81 
40 
55 
32 
38 
20 
33 
36 
28 
34 
29 
32 
23 
24 
24 
25 
13 
19 
11 
14 
10 
10 
16 
14 
8 
9 
7 
11 
11 
9 
3 
5 
5 
21 


29 


56 


133 


66 

1 
3 

2 
5 
1 
1 
4 
3 


13 

1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

• • 
1 

i 


13 

1 
1 
2 
1 
2 

1 
1 

i 


19 
2 

2 
1 
2 

• • 
3 
1 
2 
2 
1 

i 
1 


21 

5 
1 
2 

3 
2 
1 

i 

1 


16 

2 
2 

2 
4 
1 

1 
1 
1 


26 

IC 
3 
4 
2 
1 
2 

• • 
1 


36 

3 
8 
2 
8 
2 

1 

3 
3 

1 


19 

2 
8 

4 

1 

1 
1 


18 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

2 


13 

1 
2 

1 

1 

• • 
3 
1 


14 

3 
5 
1 
1 
1 

• • 
1 
1 


73 


85 


11 


18 

2 
7 

1 

4 


19 

2 
7 
1 
2 

3 


17 

7 

3 
2 
1 


37 

6 
4 
5 
3 
3 


19 

1 
1 

3 
3 

i 


5 
3 






3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
6 
2 
2 

1 
2 

'4 


4 
4 
8 
3 
2 

'4 
t 
1 

3 
3 
2 
2 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 
1 
2 

1 
1 

1 


2 
3 
2 
2 

"2 
3 
2 
3 
4 
8 
7 
2 
5 
8 
3 
6 
7 

3 
3 
3 
6 
7 
3 
3 
3 
6 
2 
4 
3 
3 
3 
12 


2 
1 
1 

2 
3 
3 
3 

7 
1 
5 
2 
3 
1 
7 
1 
4 
3 
2 
4 
2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 


5 

3 
4 
6 
3 
2 
2 
6 

10 
2 
6 
4 
3 
5 
1 
2 
2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
3 


1 
3 

2 

1 
1 
1 

"i 


i.O— 3.9 


[.0— 4.9 


i.O— 5.9 














2 
1 


3 
1 


2 

i 

1 
1 

i 




1 

1 
1 


1 
2 

"i 


1 






2 
1 


3 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 


i 

1 
1 


.0—12.9 






2 




.0—13.9 








3 


.0—14.9 


1. 


1 


1 
1 
1 
2 


1 


.0-15.9 


2 


1 


i 










.0—16.9 


2 




1 
1 










.0-17.9 


3 
















1 






.0-18.9 




















.0-19.9 










2 












1 












,0—20.9 


2 
2 




























1 
1 




0-21.9 
















1 


1 
















0-22.9 
























1 




1 
































0—24.9 


















1 














1 


i 




0-25.9 


















2 
1 
1 










0-26.9 


1 
2 
2 
2 
7 
4 


































0—27.9 


















1 




















0-28.9 
































0-29.9 
























1 


























1 




























0—31.9 






































0-32.9 








































0-33.9 












































: 0—34.9 








1 




















1 
















: and over 




1 


6 
















2 




























































PI 


JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 


A chools 


223 

3 
2 
11 
2 

15 

9 
9 
6 
13 
12 
8 
8 
24 
13 
15 
12 
12 
8 


101 9 


38 


18 


3 


6 


10 


9 


7 


5 


9 


3 7 


6 


4 


18 


21 


4 


5 


7 
1 


3 


11 


6 

1 


4 


)- 2.9 






1 




)— 4.9 
















1 
1 


1 

2 




















)- 6.9 

)- 8.9 


1 




1 




1 


1 


1 




1 
1 












1 






1 
1 




1 






1—10.9 


1 

2 




1 
1 


1 




1 


2 
2 


2 
1 




i 






1 


1 




1 




2 




1 


2 




1 1—12.9 


1^-14.9 


1 


















1 


2 










11-16.9 


..1 .. 


I 




.. 




1 


1 
1 
1 












1 


1 








1 '—18.9 








3 
1 










1 


2 
2 


1 


1 
1 
1 




2 








2 


1 -20.9 


1 
1 
1 

i 


i 

1 
1 

2 

1 


1 

1 
3 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 


i 




3 
1 


1 


i 






1 
1 


i 


1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 


2 

i 


2 —22.9 . . 


2 
3 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 


1 


1 


2 -24.9 


1 

2 












2.-29.9 




2 






2 


3 


2 




1 
1 
1 
1 


1 


1 


2 
1 
2 
2 
4 
1 


31 -34.9 










3J -39.9 


1 








1 








1 
1 








1 


4(-44.9.. . 


2 
2 
1 
2 












1 








4;— 19.9 






















5(-o4.9 






I 








1 


















5^-59.9 


4 
5 
3 
7 
2 
4 
3 
5 
2 
6 






























6C -64.9 


I 


2 


1 


















1 






















65 -69.9. 


























2 
1 










1 




70 -74.9 


1 


i 


3 

1 
1 
3 
2 
6 


2 
1 
2 
1 
1 


































75 -79.9 






































80 -84.9. 
























1 
1 
1 
















85 -89.9 






































90 -94.9 








































95 -99.9.... 








































OOund over 













































124 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 59 — Number of Puplic Schools : Average Number Belongii.g 

Year Ending June 30, 1956 



State of Maryland ! 























































Av-KRAGE 








>. 

G 


Coun 


























1 










c 






Number 


"o 




a 

=3 


<u 


a> 
























)ntgome 


o 
<i> 


c 
c 


Mary's 








o 




Belonging 


Scho 


eganj 


ne Ar 


Itimoi 


Itimoi 




roline 


rroll 


'S 


arles 


irches 


?deric 


rrett 


rford 


iward 


c 


O 
a> 
o 


een A 


nersei 


'o 


ishing 


comic 


ircest< 




< 




c 
< 


a 
ffl 




C 


d 


6 


a 


O 


o 
Q 




o 


ca 

X 


o 








3 

a 




o 


e2 






o 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



All Schools 


*786 


29 


56 


133 


66 


13 


13 


19 

2 


21 


16 


26 


36 


19 


18 


13 


14 


73 


85 


11 


18 


19 


17 


37 


19 




29 
66 


1 


1 


9 


1 

8 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


5 


1 


1 


31— 60 




£ 


4 






1 




3 




4 


9 


1 


1 


3 


2 


4 


1 


5 


6 


2 


3 


1 


61— 90 


54 


2 


3 


2 




3 


1 




2 


4 


3 


3 






1 


4 


2 


4 


3 


3 


2 




5 


2 


91— 120 


35 


3 


3 


2 




1 


1 


i 


1 




2 


1 


3 


1 








2 
6 






2 


2 


3 


3 


121— 150 


43 




7 






1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 




2 


i 


1 


3 


5 


1 


151- 180 


36 


3 




3 




2 


3 


2 


1 


4 




7 




1 


i 

3 


2 






1 


1 


3 


1 


181— 210 


29 


1 


2 


3 




2 


1 


2 


2 




i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


4 


i 


i 


1 




211— 240 


22 


3 




2 




1 


1 


i 


1 




1 


1 




2 


2 


1 


3 


1 




1 




241— 270 


37 


'8 


3 




2 






1 


2 




3 


1 


1 


2 


i 


3 


4 


1 




1 


1 


2 


271— 300 


44 


2 


2 


2 


3 


i 




5 


1 




1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


5 


10 


i 


'2 


2 


1 


301— 330 


22 


1 


4 


4 


3 


i 




"i 


1 








3 


1 






1 




1 


331— 360 


31 




1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 




1 




2 


2 




4 


6 


2 




1 


1 




1 


361— 390 


22 




1 


6 


i 


1 




1 










2 


4 




"2 


1 


i 


1 


391— 420 


26 


1 


2 


3 




1 




2 




i 


1 


2 






2 


6 








2 


1 


421— 450 


32 


3 


2 


7 


1 


i 




1 


"i 


1 










5 


4 










2 


451— 480 


25 


3 


5 


3 


2 






1 






1 


1 




2 


4 










2 




481— 510 


14 




1 


3 








1 


1 






1 




1 


1 


4 












1 




511— 540 


19 




2 


2 


2 










1 


2 




1 




5 


1 










3 




541— 570 


13 




1 


2 














1 










2 


6 




1 








571— 600 


17 




4 




o 








1 




1 








1 




1 

8 


2 












601— 660 


26 




2 


7 


2 








1 






1 






3 












1 


661— 720 


23 




1 


9 


4 














2 






2 


3 










1 


1 


721— 780 


13 




2 


3 
















1 






3 


2 










1 


1 


781— 840 


22 




i 


8 


4 






















6 


3 












841— 900 


16 






5 


6 










1 














3 
















901— 960 


14 






9 


2 






















2 


1 














961—1020 


17 
8 






10 


4 






1 












1 








1 














1021—1080 






4 


2 
















1 






1 
















1081—1140 


7 




i 


4 


2 




































1141- 1200 


3 




2 


1 










































21 






19 


2 





















































































JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



All Schools 

50 or less 


223 

5 
7 
6 
19 
9 
6 
18 
12 
9 
7 
22 
10 
12 
14 
5 
8 
9 
5 
2 

6 
4 

2 
7 
4 
4 
3 
1 
1 
2 
4 


10 
1 


9 


1 


18 


3 


6 


10 


9 


7 


5 


9 


3 
1 


7 


6 


4 


18 


21 


4 


5 


7 

1 
1 
1 
1 


3 


11 


6 
1 


51— 100 


1 " 






1 
1 


i 

1 
1 

2 

2 
1 
1 


2 


3 




















101— 150 










1 
















1 
1 


1 


2 




2 


i 
1 


151— 200 

201— 250 


1 

2 

1 

1 
1 
1 


i 


2 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 


1 
1 


2 
1 




1 


2 




i 


1 


2 




251— 300 






1 








1 
1 
1 
1 

2 








1 




301— 350 


1 




3 
1 


1 

2 








1 


2 
1 
1 


i 

1 




2 


2 


1 
1 
1 


351— 400 


1 

2 
1 


1 

i 

2 








2 




401— 450 


2 






1 
4 
1 


1 




451— 500 








1 


'2 
1 

2 
1 


2 


601— 600 

601— 700 


4 




2 




1 
1 


i 


1 
1 


1 




1 




701— 800 




1 

2 












2i 5 
4j 

^, 






•• 


1 


801— 900 


1 
2 
2 
1 








1 








1 
1 






901—1000 
















1001—1100 




1 

3 


2 
1 
2 


















1101—1200 






1 








1 
1 


1 










1 
1 
1 
3 














1201—1300 


























1 


1301—1400 


1 
























1401—1500 


1 
1 


2 

i 


1 

1 

2 
2 
2 
1 


































1 




1501— 1 GOO 


1 

1 
2 


















1 








1701—1800 






























1801—1900 
























1 
1 
1 


1 














1901—2000 




































2001—2100 


1 

2 
1 






































2101—2200 






































2201—2300 








































2301—2400 






1 
2 
4 








































2401—2500 










































2601 and over 














































■ 









































• A total of seven seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior high school 
curriculum (two each in Allegany and Baltimore, three in Carroll) are included in the number of elementary schools 
and excluded from the number of high schools. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



125 



TABLE 60 

Supervisory* and Pupil Personnel Services Provided by the Counties and Baltimore 
City in Maryland Public Schools: Number of Principals and Teachers: 
Year Ending June 30, 1956 



County 


Number of 
Principals 

and 
Teachers 


Total 
Supervisors 


General Supervisors 
by Type of School 

Elementary ! High 


Other 
Supervisorst 


Pupa 

Personnel 


Total State 


17,852 


6 


297 


8 


102 


6 


66 


3 


128 


9 


122 


9 


Allegany 


627 


2 


10 


5 


3 





2 





5 


5 


3 





Anne Arunde; . . . 


1,096 


3 


16 


5 


6 


5 


4 


5 


5 


5 


6 





Baltimore City. . 


5,070 


5 


110 


7 


27 


5 


13 


5 


69 


7 


51 





Baltimore 


2,362 


4 


31 


6 


8 





9 


6 


14 





14 





Calvert 


134 





3 





2 





1 









1 







166 





2 


4 


1 


4 


1 









1 





Carroll 


370 





5 


5 


2 


2 


2 





i 


3 


2 





Cecil 


329 


5 


4 


8 


2 





2 








8 


2 





Charles 


249 





4 





2 





2 









2 







211 





3 





2 





1 









1 







442 


6 


6 





2 


2 


2 


3 


1 


5 


2 





Garrett 


183 


9 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 









1 





Harford 


498 





6 


5 


3 





3 


5 






2 


5 


Howard 


232 





4 





2 





2 









2 





Kent 


125 


9 


2 


5 


1 


5 


1 









1 





Montgomery .... 


2,08U 


6 


29 


6 


13 





6 





10 


6 


10 


9 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . 


1.880 


9 


26 





9 





4 





13 





9 





140 


5 


2 


5 


1 


5 


1 









1 





St. Mary's 


168 


8 


2 





2 













1 





Somerset 


167 





3 





1 


6 


1 


4 






1 





Talbot 


157 


5 


2 


5 


1 


5 


1 









1 





Washington 


648 


1 


11 





3 





2 





6 


6 


4 


5 


Wicomico 


311 


6 


4 





3 





1 









2 







199 


3 


4 





1 


5 


1 


5 


"i 


6 


1 






126 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



o 
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05 
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th o^;o_cD^oo__ 
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ICX t-OiCO 
CO «0 00 l> 

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to -"S* 

t- .-I CO lO 



t> «o o o 
CD ;o oc «D ic 
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CTJ t> t-4 Oi t> 

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co^^co^^io^oc^^eo 
o"t-'"co'"u5oo'" 
oolocooi-i 

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CO o T-i 00 oj 

05^0^05 Tj<^CO_^ 
rH0c'"O5C0'"c0 

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CO X 1-1 05 



cot- CO coco 
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O^OiOCiOS OiOiO^CiO^ 00^0930) 



Maryland State Department of Education 



127 



TABLE 62— Source of Current Expenses :* Maryland Public Schools : 
Year Ending June 30, 1956 













Per Cent from Each Source 




Total 






Local Levy 












County 


Current 


State 


Federal 


and Other 




btate 






Local 




Funds 






Local Sources 










Levy 


















Fed- 


and 












Equal- 






eral 


Other 












ization 


Other 


Total 




Local 












Fund 








Sources 


)tal otate 


T$lio,213,952 


1148,932,290 


C r i 1 Q 001 

3>0. 413,0^1 


3.000,330 


14.7 


23.5 


38.2 


4.2 


57.6 




4,143,968 


2,319,867 


119.642 


1,704,459 


37.7 


18.3 


56.0 


2.9 


41.1 


Anne Arundel 


6,650,313 


3,661,972 


405,994 


2,582,347 


34.7 


20.4 


55.1 


6.1 


38.8 




139,503,093 


t9,192.470 


624,148 


t29.686.475 




23.3 


23.3 


1.6 


75.1 




15,911,188 


3,139,895 


388,852 


12.382,441 


'L2 


18.5 


19.7 


2.5 


77.8 


Calvert 


840,314 


621,950 


36,273 


182,091 


53.3 


20.7 


74.0 


4.3 


21.7 


Caroline 


1,019,956 


736.037 


18,699 


265,220 


52.5 


19.7 


72.2 


1.8 


26.0 


Carroll 


2,259,670 


1,2"'^,605 


40,905 


996,160 


34.0 


20.1 


54.1 


1.8 


44.1 


Cecil 


2,031,005 


1,083,263 


141,029 


806,713 


33.8 


19.5 


53.3 


7.0 


39.7 




1,582,594 


1.111,017 


192,181 


279,396 


50.9 


19.3 


70.2 


12.1 


17.7 


Dorchester 


1,367,203 


746,029 


24,957 


596,217 


35.6 


19.0 


54.6 


1.8 


43.6 


Frederick 


2,774.471 


1,389,980 


125,377 


1,259,114 


30.1 


20.0 


50.1 


4.5 


45.4 


3arrett 


1,209.401 


974.560 


33,870 


200,971 


62.2 


18.4 


80.6 


2.8 


16.6 


Harford 


3.248.933 


1,579,870 


470,667 


1,198.396 


29.9 


18.7 


48.6 


14.5 


36.9 


Howard 


1,428.658 


862,012 


62,167 


504.479 


40.7 


19.6 


60.3 


4.4 


35.3 


Kent 


800,606 


496.462 


12,498 


291.646 


42.4 


19.6 


62.0 


1.6 


36.4 


\Iontgomery 


14,175,906 


3,208,485 


1,142,641 


9,824,780 


5.7 


16.9 


22.6 


8.1 


69.3 


i^ince George's 


12,303.474 


5,031,637 


1,077.079 


6,194,758 


22.3 


18.6 


40.9 


8.8 


50.3 


Jueen Anne's 


915.589 


541,169 


18,548 


355,872 


40.5 


18.6 


59.1 


2.0 


38.9 


)t. Mary's 


1.088,946 


679,398 


141,127 


268.421 


42.8 


19.6 


62.4 


13.0 


24.6 


Somerset 


980,745 


757,619 


8,052 


215.074 


56.5 


20.8 


77.3 


0.8 


21.9 


Talbot 


973.813 


543,708 


16,762 


413,343 


35.7 


20.1 


55.8 


1.7 


42.5 


Vashington 


4.465.493 


2,035,996 


261,829 


2,167,668 


27.6 


18.0 


45.6 


5.9 


48.5 


Vicomico 


1,985.389 


1,036.381 


32,224 


916.784 


32.7 


19.5 


52.2 


1.6 


46.2 


Vorcester 


1,281,897 


688,587 


22,800 


570,510 


34.4 


19.3 


53.7 


1.8 


44.5 



Includes payments applicable to the preceding year received after June 30. 1955 and excludes those for the current year received 
;r June 30, 1956. 

Includes $5,230,106 for the Teachers' Retirement System and $41,221 for related expense fund not distributed to the twenty-three 
nties in these columns. 

Includes funds for teachers in the Retirement System as follows: State, $2,756,324; Baltimore City local funds. $167,025; total. 
123,349. 



128 Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 63 — Per Cent Distribution of School Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of 
Education : Year Ending June 30, 1956 











Current 


Expenses 


















Books 








Fixed 










Salaries 


Materials, 








Charges 










of 


and 






Other 


and 


Capital 


County 


Adminis- 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


Mainten- 


School 


Payments 


Outlay* 




tration 


vision 


and 


Costs of 




ance 


Services 


to Ad- 








Teachers 


Instruction 








joining 




















Units 








INCLUDING 


COST OF TRANSPORTATION 






Total State 


2.2 


1. 5 


63.2 


5. 4 


8.2 


4. 


1 

8.3 


1 

1 t7.2 


$27.94 


Allegany 


1.7 


1.6 


67.1 


4.6 


8.5 


3.5 


11.7 


1 3 


20.8' 


Anne Arundel . . 


2.6 


1.7 


68.7 


5.0 


7.7 


3. 5 


9.3 


l'5 


29.6^ 


Baltimore City. . 


2.5 


1.6 


65.7 


5.3 


8.6 


3.5 


5.1 


t7.7 


20.8{ 


Baltimore 


2.1 


1.7 


67.2 


7.5 


7.6 


5.5 


7.6 


0.8 


41.1; 


Calvert 


2.7 


2 1 


fin 7 


3 5 


6 2 


4 3 


1 Q A 


1.1 


6'm 


Caroline 


2.2 


1.6 


67.2 


2.2 


5.4 


5. 1 


15.3 


1. 


.2i 


Carroll 


1. 5 


1.8 


70.0 


4.0 


6.2 


2.5 


12.6 


1.4 


23.9{ 


Cecil 


1.6 


1.6 


65.6 


5.5 


9.1 


3.9 


11.6 


1.1 


34.6; 


Charles 


2.3 


1.6 


63.7 


4.7 


10.4 


1.9 


14.1 


1.3 


29.3; 


Dorchester 


2.C 


1.4 


63.8 


3.4 


8.6 


3.7 


15.0 


2. 1 


5.3 


Frederick 


1.6 


1.4 


67.8 


4.6 


7.3 


4.5 


11.4 


1.4 


24.6: 




2.2 


1.1 


61. 1 


2.7 


5. 1 


2.6 


22.1 


3.1 


8.8' 


Harford 


2.2 


1.3 


63.3 


5. 1 


8.2 


4.3 


14.7 


0.9 


26.6 




1.9 


1.7 


63.2 


4.2 


6.7 


5. 1 


15.1 


2. 1 


5.8' 


Kent 


3.2 


2.1 


63.9 


4.5 


6.6 


2.9 


15.8 


1.0 


4.1 


Montgomery . . . 


2.5 


1.5 


66.2 


6.6 


9.8 


4.6 


8.2 


0.6 


35.4 


Prince George's . 


1.8 


1.5 


64.5 


6.8 


10.9 


5.8 


7.4 


1.3 


34.6 


Queen Anne's. . . 


2.4 


1. 7 


62.5 


4.4 


6.3 


3.2 


17.6 


1.9 


27.4 


St. Mary's 


2.8 


1.2 


57.6 


4.9 


8.7 


6.0 


18.3 


0.5 


33.4 




2.3 


1.9 


67.1 


2.9 


6.2 


3.2 


14.3 


2.1 


8.3 


Talbot 


3.8 


1.7 


66.0 


3.6 


8.4 


2.4 


12.7 


1.4 


32.3 


Washington .... 


3.1 


1.9 


66.4 


5.9 


7.2 


3.7 


10.7 


1. 1 


39.2 


Wicomico 


2. 1 


1.3 


65.6 


5.2 


7.1 


3.4 


13.7 


1.6 


16.5 


Worcester 


2.6 


1.9 


62.4 


4.3 


8.1 


3.0 


16.4 


1.3 


21.5 



EXCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



Total State 


2.3 


1 


6 


66.3 


5.7 


8.6 


4.2 


3.7 


t7.6 


$28.9 


AUeganv 


1.8 


1 


8 


72.7 


5.0 


9.2 


3.8 


4.3 


1.4 


22.2 


Anne Arundel. . . 


2.7 


1 


8 


73.7 


5.4 


8.3 


3.7 


2.8 


1.6 


31.C 


Baltimore City. . 


2. 5 


1 


6 


65.9 


5.4 


8.6 


3.5 


4.8 


t7.7 


20.S 


Baltimore 


2.2 


1 


8 


70.8 


7.9 


8. 1 


5.8 


2.5 


0.9 


42.4 


Calvert 


3.2 




6 


73.4 


4.2 


7.6 


5.1 


2.6 


1.3 


6.J 


Caroline 


2.5 


1 


9 


77.4 


2.5 


6.2 


5.9 


2.4 


1.2 




Carroll 


1.7 


2 





77.6 


4.4 


6.8 


2.8 


3.1 


1.6 


25^ 


Cecil 


1.8 


1 


8 


72.0 


6.0 


10.0 


4.2 


2.9 


1.3 


36.' 




2.5 


1 


8 


72.1 


5.3 


11.8 


2.2 


2.8 


1.5 


31.i 


Dorchester 


2.3 


1 


6 


73.4 


3.9 


9.9 


4.3 


2.2 


2.4 


6.( 


Frederick 


1.8 


1 


5 


74.7 


5.0 


8.0 


5.0 


2.5 


1.5 


26.1 


Garrett 


2.7 


1 


4 


76. 1 


3.4 


6.3 


3.3 


3.0 


3.8 


10.1 


Harford 


2.5 




5 


71.4 


5.7 


9.3 


4.9 


3.7 


1.0 


29.( 


Howard 


2. 1 


1 


9 


71.6 


4.8 


7.6 


5.8 


3.8 


2.4 


6. 


Kent 


3.7 


2 


4 


73.7 


5.2 


7.6 


3.4 


2.8 


1.2 


4. 


Montgomery . . . 


2.6 


1 


6 


68.8 


6.8 


10.2 


4.8 


4.6 


0.6 


36. 

35. 


Prince George's . 


1.8 


1 


6 


67.3 


7. 1 


11.4 


6. 1 


3.4 


1.3 


Queen Anne's. . . 


2.9 


2 


1 


73.7 


5. 1 


7.4 


3.8 


2.7 


2.3 


30. 


St. Mary's 


3.3 


1 


5 


69.1 


5.9 


10.3 


7. 1 


2. 1 


0.7 


37. 


Somerset 


2.6 


2 


2 


77.0 


3.4 


7. 1 


3.7 


1.6 


2.4 


9. 


Talbot 


4.3 


1 


9 


74.0 


4.0 


9.4 


2.7 


2.1 


16 


34. 


Washington .... 


3.3 


2 





70.3 


6.3 


7.7 


4.0 


5.2 


1.2 


40. 


Wicomico 


2.3 


1 


4 


73 7 


5.9 


8.0 


3.8 


3. 1 


1 .8 


18. 


Worcester 


3.1 


2 


3 


73.4 


5.1 


9.5 


3.6 


1.5 


1.5 


24. 



* Percentages ol)tained by dividing capital outlay by the sum of capital outlay and current expenses excluding 
debt service. 

t Ai)propriation8 of State and Baltimore City funds for the retirement of teachers are included. Retirement 
for county teachers not distributed to the counties in this column. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



129 



TABLE 64 — Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging: Current Expenses: 
Counties of Maryland : 1923-1956 





Cost per Pupil Belong ino 


FOR Current 






Expenses 




Year Ending 








June 30 


Tot!il* 


Elementary 


High 


1923 


$ 43.00 


$ 34.84 


$ 90.79 


1928 


52.62 


42.91 


93..- 1 


1933 


51.89 


42.51 


79.32 


1938 


61.12 


50.70 


87.5J 


1943 


71.16 


60.39 


100.46 


1947 


114.54 


92. S3 


145.20 


1948 


157.30 


124.19 


194.71 


1949 


172 47 


133.08 


207.84 


1950 


176.92 


137.60 


208.07 


1951 


186.34 


141.80 


214.60 


1952 


206.80 


162.26 


240.20 


1953 


216.17 


172.94 


246.25 


1954 


226.44 


181.55 


252.69 


1955 


242.47 


200.26 


260.41 


1956 


261.58 


215.59 


286.13 



* Administration, fixed charges, and kindergartens are included in the total but excluded from ele- 
mentary and high costs. 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 131 



TABLE 66 — Cost per Pupil Belonging: Current Expenses:* Maryland Public 
Day Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1956 



County 


Totalt 


All Schools 
Elementary 


High 


Administra- 
tion 


Fixed 
Charges 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Total State 


$250.57 




$215.59 




$286.13 




$5.93 




$2.09 




Allegany 


259.20 


5 


227.84 


4 


278.40 


15 


4.53 


20 


3.50 


5 


Anne Arundel. . . 


224.39 


23 


193.13 


23 


252.68 


24 


5.87 


10 


3.44 


7 


Bjiltimore City . . 


253.22 


10 


212.89 


8 


301.57 


6 


6.82 


6 


0.67 


24 


Baltimore 


247.89 


14 


218.97 


7 


275.37 


17 


5.21 


16 


2.09 


21 


Calvert 


241.34 


17 


198.57 


21 


290.67 


10 


6.56 


9 


2.72 


15 


Caroline 


256.70 


8 


212.46 


10 


302.59 


5 


5.67 


13 


2.55 


17 


Carroll 


238.06 


20 


195.03 


22 


279.83 


14 


3.74 


23 


3.31 


9 




241.99 


16 


201.80 


18 


293.21 


9 


4.01 


22 


2.76 


14 


Charles 


253.10 


11 


237.30 


3 


254.32 


23 


5.76 


11 


3.45 


6 


Dorchester 


248.61 


13 


198.81 


20 


300.18 


7 


5.05 


17 


5.01 


1 


Frederick 


222.37 


24 


186.01 


24 


258.85 


22 


3.72 


24 


2.52 


18 


Garrett 


257.03 


7 


237.33 


2 


264.96 


21 


5.75 


12 


2.21 


20 


Harford 


240.71 


19 


209.82 


13 


271.07 


18 


5.47 


15 


2.29 


19 


Howard 


253.94 


9 


209.66 


14 


295.23 


8 


4.91 


19 


4.75 


4 


Kent 


263.11 


3 


211.49 


12 


312.47 


2 


8.54 


2 


2.63 


16 


Montgomery . . . 


281.14 


1 


250.23 


1 


311.54 


3 


6.64 


8 


1.62 


22 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


241.06 


18 


212.29 


11 


270.35 


19 


4.36 


21 


3.13 


12 


276.88 


2 


224.47 


5 


325.12 


1 


6.85 


5 


4.85 


2 


St. Mary's 


235.98 


21 


204.57 


16 


276.16 


16 


6.65 


7 


1.31 


23 


Somerset 


244.35 


15 


203.41 


17 


279.85 


13 


5.64 


14 


4.78 


3 


Talbot 


251.32 


12 


209.02 


15 


280.73 


12 


9.77 


1 


3.16 


11 


Washington .... 


258.76 


6 


219.44 


6 


286.18 


11 


8.12 


3 


3.00 


13 


Wicomico 


235.35 


22 


201.07 


19 


268.62 


20 


4.95 


18 


3.27 


10 


Worcester 


261.10 


4 


212.69 


9 


311.18 


4 


6.93 


4 


3.42 


8 



* Excludes nursery schools, home teaching of handicapped children, junior colleges, adult education, 
veterans' training, and federal funds for school lunches. Also excludes kindergartens and Teachers' 
Retirement System — per picpi) costs of which are shown below: 





Per Pupil Costt 


County 


Total 






Including 


Teachers' 




Kindergar- 


Retirement 




tens and 


System 




Retirement 


only 


Total State 


$261.66 


$17.16 


Baltimore City 


260.50 


19.89 


Baltimore 


247.83 






258.75 




Washington 


254.49 





t Expenditures for administration and fixed charges are included here but excluded from elementary 
and high costs. 



132 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 67— Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Day Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1956 







Instructional Service 








County 


Total 












Other 




Current 




Salaries of 




Operation 


Mainte- 


School 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


nance 


Services 






visiont 


and 
















Teachers 










Total State 


$242.22 


$4.33 


$173.45 


$13.42 


$22.81 


$11.13 


$17.08 




251.17 


4.35 


178.91 


12.02 


22.76 


9.38 


23.75 




215.08 


3.88 


157.28 


10.63 


17.65 


7.96 


17.68 


Baltimore City 


245.04 


4.78 


185.71 


12.31 


25.25 


10.13 


6.86 


Baltimore 


240.59 


4.30 


169.91 


17.55 


19.32 


14.04 


15.47 


Calvert 


232.06 


5.23 


148.72 


8.41 


15.29 


10.44 


43.97 




248.53 


4.27 


174.67 


5.52 


14.07 


13.23 


36.77 


Carroll 


231.02 


4.42 


169.98 


9.08 


14.94 


6.15 


26.45 


Cecil 


235.21 


3^9 


161.20 


13.01 


22.43 


9.49 


25.09 


Charles 


243.88 


4.04 


163.31 


11.70 


26.62 


4.98 


33.23 


Dorchester 


238.55 


3.52 


161.15 


8.39 


21.64 


9.36 


34.49 


Frederick 


216.14 


3.20 


153.86 


10.08 


16.50 


10.23 


22.27 




249.07 


2.98 


163.85 


7.27 


13.64 


7.01 


54.32 


Harford 


232.94 


3.21 


156.33 


11.90 


20.30 


10.67 


30.53 


Howard 


244.28 


4.49 


165.07 


10.86 


17.43 


13.27 


33.16 




251.93 


5.65 


170.48 


11.78 


17.57 


7.76 


38.69 




271.88 


4.62 


192.28 


16.93 


29.68 


13.92 


14.45 




233.57 


3.78 


159.61 


15.58 


26.98 


14.31 


13.31 




265.17 


4.92 


175.94 


12.02 


17.73 


9.05 


45.51 


St. Mary's 


228.02 


2.92 


137.51 


11.33 


20.62 


14.18 


41.46 


Somerset 


233.93 


4.75 


165.28 


7.09 


15.28 


7.93 


33.60 


Talbot 


238.39 


4.19 


168.54 


9.04 


21.37 


6.21 


29.04 


Washington 


247.36 


5.13 


177.18 


15.54 


19.50 


10.12 


19.89 


Wicomico 


227.13 


3.01 


156.98 


12.41 


17.14 


8.11 


29.48 


Worcester 


250.75 


5.09 


164.25 


11.29 


21.17 


7.99 


40.96 , 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, kindergartens, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VII and XIX for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



133 



TABLE 68 — Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Elementary Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1956 







Instructional Service 










Total 












Other 


County 


Current 




Salaries of 




Operation 


Mainte- 


School 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


nance 


Services 






visioni" 


and 
















Teachers 










otal State 


$215.59 


$4.10 


$153.57 


$11.53 


$20.86 


$10.57 


$14.96 


Allegany 


227.84 


3.56 


160.48 


9.59 


20.30 


9.48 


24.43 


Anne Arundel 


193.13 


3.28 


143.35 


8.77 


16.59 


6.33 


14.81 


Baltimore City 


212.89 


4.46 


160.38 


11.15 


20.91 


9.54 


6.45 


Baltimore 


218.97 


4.26 


157.30 


14.81 


17.99 


14.32 


10.29 


Calvert 


198.57 


5.40 


129.89 


6.00 


14.03 


8.14 


35.11 


Caroline 


212.46 


4.06 


144.50 


2.74 


13.48 


12.12 


35.56 


Carroll 


195.03 


3.57 


142.53 


5.73 


13. .30 


5.04 


24.86 


Cecil 


201.80 


2.52 


136.46 


9.59 


21.79 


8.30 


23.14 


Charles 


237.30 


3.09 


163.34 


11.72 


23.82 


4.45 


30.88 


Dorchester 


198.81 


3.84 


136.28 


5.91 


16.44 


6.27 


30.07 




Frederick 


186.01 


3.10 


128.13 


7.93 


16.84 


10.26 


19.75 




Garrett 


237.33 


2.84 


157.71 


5.15 


12.83 


7.30 


51.50 




Harford 


209.82 


2.59 


142.00 


8.41 


16.79 


10.26 


29.77 




Howard 


209.66 


4.04 


130.15 


7.36 


16.12 


12.95 


31.04 




Kent 


211.49 


5.58 


139.68 


8.15 


16.31 


5.73 


36.04 




Montgomery 


250.23 


480 


170.90 


13.94 


31.28 


14.03 


1.5.28 




Prince George's 


212.29 


3.97 


143.96 


15.52 


25.72 


12.98 


10.14 




Queen Anne's 


224.47 


5.27 


148.09 


8.17 


13.77 


6.51 


42.66 




St. Mary's 


204.57 


3.36 


122.66 


9.89 


19.65 


13.00 


36.01 




Somerset 


203.41 


3.93 


143.07 


6.27 


11.95 


7.68 


30.51 




Talbot 


209.02 


3.34 


145.26 


5.84 


18.41 


7.43 


28.74 




Washington 


219.44 


4.08 


156.30 


12.15 


19.35 


8.98 


18.58 




Wicomico 


201.07 


3.66 


139.75 


10.43 


14.31 


7.43 


25.49 




Worcester 


212.69 


4.99 


138.75 


8.31 


18.12 


7.47 


35.05 



" Excludes administration, fixed charges, kindergartens, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t- Consists of salaries and travel 

See TABLES VII and XX for basic data. 



134 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 69— Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public High Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1956 







Instructional Service 








County 


Total 












Other 




Current 




Salaries of 




Operation 


Mainte- 


School 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


nance 


Services 






visiont 


and 














Teachers 










Total State 


$286.13 


$4.71 


$206.25 


$16.54 


$26.01 


$12.05 


$20.57 


Allegany 


278.40 


5.26 


200.43 


14.84 


25.64 


9.27 


22.96 


Anne Arundel 


252.68 


4.92 


181.14 


13.81 


19.48 


10.74 


22.61 


Baltimore City 


301.57 


5.33 


230.27 


14.35 


32.87 


11.17 


7.58 




275.37 


4.36 


190.19 


21.95 


21.46 


13.60 


23.81 


Calvert 


290.67 


4.93 


181.66 


12.64 


17.51 


14.46 


59.47 




302.59 


4.58 


219.88 


9.69 


14.94 


14.91 


38.59 


Carroll 


279.83 


5.57 


207.22 


13.62 


17.16 


7.66 


28.60 


Cecil 


293.21 


6.55 


204.14 


18.94 


23.53 


11.57 


28.48 


Charles 


254.32 


5.54 


163.27 


11.67 


31.07 


5.81 


36.96 




300.18 


3.03 


199.72 


12.23 


29.70 


14.15 


41.35 


Frederick 


258.85 


3.33 


190.35 


13.12 


16.01 


10.20 


25.84 


Garrett 


264.96 


3.18 


172.17 


10.12 


14.73 


6.62 


58.14 


Harford 


271.07 


4.24 


179.96 


17.66 


26.08 


11.35 


31.78 


Howard 


295.23 


5.17 


204.70 


16.00 


19.35 


13.73 


36.28 


Kent 


312.47 


5.75 


216.58 


17.21 


19.46 


10.81 


42.66 




311.54 


4.31 


231.44 


22.39 


26.74 


13.72 


12.94 


Prince George's 


270.35 


3.43 


186.66 


15.69 


29.17 


16.63 


18.77 




325.12 


4.39 


216.95 


17.69 


23.57 


12.80 


49.72 


St. Mary's 


276.18 


2.01 


168.00 


14.31 


22.61 


16.60 


52.63 




279.85 


6.00 


198.70 


8.31 


20.28 


8.31 


38.25 


Talbot 


280.73 


5.41 


202.11 


13.64 


25.64 


4.46 


29.47 




^86.18 


6.60 


206.21 


20.24 


19.70 


11.71 


21.72 


Wicornico 


268.62 


1.99 


184.41 


15.55 


21.63 


9.20 


35.84 


Worcester 


311.18 


5.27 


204.72 


16.02 


26.01 


8.81 


50.35 



♦ Excludes administration, fixed charges, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VII and XXI for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



135 




136 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 71 — Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal: 
State of Maryland : 1923-1956 





Average Annual Salary per Teacher and 






Principal 




Year Ending 








June 30 


Total 


Elementary 


High 


1923 


$ 1,243 


$ 1,156 


$ 1,671 


1928 


1,408 


1,320 


1,830 


1933 


1,453 


1,398 


1,659 


1938 


1,556 


1,487 


1,784 


1943 


1,775 


1,648 


1,994 


1947 


2,474 


2,356 


2,634 


1948 


3.299 


3,216 


3,403 


1949 


3,376 


3,217 


3,591 


1950 


3,569 


3,513 


3,640 


1951 


3,621 


3,601 


3,646 


1952 


3,886 


3,858 


3,919 


1953 


3,947 


3,891 


4,019 


1954 


4,093 


4,020 


4,186 


1955 


4,163 


4,104 


4,237 


1956 


4,465 


4,450 


4,482 



Maryland State Department of Education 



137 



TABLE 72 — Average Salary* per Teacher and Principal : Maryland Public Schools : 

Year Ending June 30, 1956 



County 


All Schools 


Elementary 


High 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipalsf 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipalsf 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipals! 


Total State 


$4,464 


$4,360 


$6,394 


$4,450 


$4,323 


$6,218 


$4,482 


$4,405 


$6,861 


Alleganv 


4,393 


4,307 


5,882 


4,345 


4,239 


5,592 


4,438 


4,369 


6,580 


Anne Arundel . . 


4,089 


3,997 


5,656 


4,029 


3,006 


5,435 


4,172 


4,117 


6,922 


Baltimore City. . 


5,070 


4,936 


7,722 


5,007 


4,834 


7,678 


5,149 


5.060 


7,824 


Baltimore 


4,451 


4,347 


7,520 


4,455 


4,323 


7,267 


4,447 


4,378 


8,394 


Calvert 


3,769 


3,639 


5,083 


3,800 


3,650 


4,878 


3,730 


3,627 


5,700 


Caroline 


4,096 


4,014 


5,251 


4,220 


4.196 


4,580 


3,981 


3,844 


5,810 


Carroll 


3,963 


3,982 


5,263 


3,989 


3,934 


5,011 


3,939 


3,854 


5,490 


Cecil 


3,990 


3,902 


5.421 


3,973 


3,893 


5,320 


4.009 


3,913 


5,533 


Charles 


3,985 


3,909 


5,018 


4,539 


4,501 


4,925 


3,339 


3,253 


5,240 


Dorchester 


4,123 


4,033 


5,083 


4,218 


4,129 


4,854 


4,026 


3,943 


5,680 


Frederick 


4,231 


4,142 


5,573 


4,233 


4,122 


5,351 


4,229 


4,160 


6,113 


Garrett 


4,090 


4,037 


4,914 


4,204 


4,147 


4,850 


3,957 


3,915 


5,083 


Harford 


4,071 


4,006 


5,473 


4,314 


4,268 


5,073 


3.794 


3.716 


6,329 


Howard 


3,861 


3,771 


5,281 


3,836 


3,742 


5,138 


3,887 


3,801 


5.467 


Kent 


4,034 


3,949 


5,288 


4,119 


4,009 


5,117 


3,955 


3,897 


5,800 


Montgomery . . . 


4,437 


4,326 


6,815 


4,310 


4,169 


6,499 


4,619 


4,542 


8,063 


Prince George's . 


4,127 


4,023 


5,987 


4,117 


3,985 


5,763 


4,139 


4,072 


6,932 


Queen Anne's . . . 


4,027 


3,928 


4,918 


4,140 


4,036 


4,745 


3,919 


3,835 


5,350 


St. Mary's 


3,673 


3,579 


5,027 


3,728 


3,661 


4,767 


3,594 


3,459 


5,340 


Somerset 


3,884 


3,787 


4,943 


3,896 


3,842 


4,500 


3,872 


3,729 


5,386 


Talbot 


4,059 


3,969 


5,058 


4,046 


3,933 


4,845 


4,073 


4,004 


5,767 


Washington .... 


4,540 


4,45: 


5,835 


4,559 


4,457 


5,592 


4,521 


4,454 


6,550 


Wicomico 


4,130 


4,043 


5,347 


4,119 


4,031 


5,042 


4,143 


4,056 


6,100 


Worcester 


3,974 


3,908 


5,000 


3,978 


3,927 


4,588 


3,970 


3,890 


5,825 



* Grades 1 through 12 only; nursery schools, kindergartens, and junior colleges are excluded, 
t Includes all principals having two or more assistants without regard to division of time between teaching and 
administration. 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



139 



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140 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 75 

Number of Schools to Which Transportation Was Provided at Public Expense : 
Number of Vehicles Used: State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1956 



County 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundelf . 
Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 
St. Mary's. . . . 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington. . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester .... 



Total 
Number 

of 
Schools 



939 

34 
65 
163 
82 
16 

13 
21 
24 
19 
31 

39 
21 
23 
17 
16 

90 
104 
15 
20 
22 

20 
45 
22 
17 



Number of Schooi^ to Which 
Transportation Was Provided 



Total 



717 

29 
58 
15 
80 
15 

12 
21 
23 
19 
29 

37 
20 
23 
16 
16 

71 
78 
15 
20 
^■0 

20 
42 
21 
17 



Ele- 
mentary 
Only 



524 



Combined 
Elem. & 
High 



High 
School 
Only 



61 



132 

5 
9 
9 
16 

3 



Number of Vehicles 



Buses Owned by 



County 



512 

i 

108 



158 
136 



Con- 
tractors 



1.446 



132 
14 

153 
40 

43 
63 
58 
57 
54 

86 
75 
102 
52 
36 



* Each asterisk denotes one county-owned station wagon, 
t Excludes one horse in Garrett and one boat in Somerset. 

t Excludes elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College and bus carrying pupils there. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



141 



TABLE 76 — Federal Funds Allotted and Expended in Maryland: Vocational 
Education: Year Ending June 30, 1956 



Type of 
Vocational Program 


1956 
Allotment 


1956 
Expenditures 


Balance, 
June 29, 1956 


Total 


$417,404 

110,317 
174,715 
96,655 
15,631 
20,086 


$403,030 

110,317 
160,341 
96,655 
15,631 
20,086 


$14,374 






14,374 






Distribution Education 









TABLE 77 — Expenditures for Administration and Supervision and Teacher Training 
in Vocational Education : State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1956 

■ 



Source of Expenditures 




Type of 


Vocational 


Program 




Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Education 


Total 












State and University Funds . . . 


$34,055 


$11,856 


$10,221 


$11,524 


$454 


Federal Funds 


33,909 


11,816 


10,157 


11,489 


447 


State Administration and 












Supervision 












State Funds 


27,955 


8.856 


10,221 


8,424 


454 


Federal Funds 


27,809 


8,816 


10,157 


8,389 


447 


Teaching Training 












University of Maryland Funds. 


6,100 


3,000 




3,100 




Federal Funds 


6,100 


3,000 




3,100 











142 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 78 — Expenditures of Federal Vocational Funds in Maryland : 
Year Ending June 30, 1956 



Type of Expenditure 


Type of Vocational Program 


AU 

Subjects 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Education 


Total Expended in Maryland .... 

Instruction in Schools: 

Day Schools 

Adult Education 

Co-operative and Continuation 
Supervision 


$403,030 

271,244 
76,239 
15,818 
868 

732 
4,220 

6.100 
27,809 


$116,738 

100,554 
4,368 


$163,467 

109,446 
38,044 

" ' 868 

732 
4,220 


$102,739 

57,834 
33,416 


$ 20,086 

3,410 
411 
15,818 


Instruction by the University of 
Maryland 
















Teacher Training and 

Guidance 


3.C00 
8,816 


3,100 
8,389 




State Administration and 


10,157 


447 



Maryland State Department of Education 



143 



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1,628 


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1,787 


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1,748 
443 


4,284 
805 


Salaries 

and 
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1,242 
2,233 





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144^ 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



145 



TABLE 81 — Adult Education Classes: Number of Teachers and Enrollment by Subject: 

State of Maryland : 1955-56 



County 


Number 
of 

Tp3.chprs 


Enrollment 


Total 


Agri- 
culture 


Home 
Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Business 
Education 


General 


Total State 


890 


36,795 


332 


3,790 


1,808 


4,541 


26.324 


Allegany 


24 


648 


68 


355 


47 


178 




Anne Arundel 


18 


478 




93 


37 


348 






491 


29,076 




1,399 


1.190 


441 


26.046 




142 


1.386 




552 




798 


36 


Calvert 


5 


96 


ie 


47 




33 




Caroline 


4 


145 




40 




105 




Carroll 


4 


128 






' 50 


78 




Cecil 


4 


120 






6 


114 




Charles 


7 


217 


17 


' '84 




116 




Dorchester 




116 


46 


22 




48 




' Frederick 


6 


122 


12 


15 




75 


20 


Garrett 


10 


203 


38 




' 35 


103 


27 




24 


535 


50 




61 


394 


30 


Howard 


6 


133 


24 


" 'i5 




94 




Kent 


5 


79 




14 




54 


" "ii 


Montgomery 


41 


652 






227 


411 


14 


Prince George's 


44 


1,886 




944 


141 


801 




Queen Anne's 


3 


87 


'i4 






73 




St. Mary's 
































Talbot 


3 


44 


14 


13 




17 




Washington 


?8 


321 


18 


113 




82 


ios 


Wicomico 


9 


221 


15 


68 


14 


124 




Worcester 


6 


102 




16 




54 


"32 



146 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 82— Adult Education Program: Titles of Courses Offered: 
Counties of Maryland : 1955-56 



Title of Course 



Number of 
Classes 



Title of Course 



Agriculture 

Agriculture 

Farm Practices 

Young Farmers 

Vocational Agriculture Shop . 

Total 

Home Economics 

Clothing Construction 

Cooking 

Home Crafts 

Home Economics 

Home Nursing 

Interior Decorating 

Millinery 

Rug Making 

Upholstering, Draperies, and 
Slip Covers 

Total 

BusiNTJSS Education 

Bookkeeping 

Business English 

Commercial 

Office Practice 

Shorthand 

Typing 

Total 

General 

Art 

English 

Health and Recreation 

Mathematics 



133 
2 



187 



1 
2 
1 
41 
104 

158 



General — (Continued) 

Science 

Sewing 

Shop Mathematics 

Social Studies 

Total 

Trades and Industry 

Aerodynamics 

Aircraft Electrical Functions . . . . 

Aircraft Estimating 

Aircraft Structures 

Automobile Mechanics 

Blueprint Reading 

Building Trades 

Drafting 

Electric Arc and Acetylene 

Welding 

Electronics 

Human Relations 

Human Relations and Safety 

Principles 

Industrial Chemistry 

Machine Shop 

Master Lines 

Mechanical Drawing 

Radio and Television 

Refrigeration & Air Conditioning 

Sheet Metal 

Shop Mathematics 

Technical Illustration , 

Welding 

Total 



Maryland State Department of Education 



147 



TABLE 83— Number of Classes and Enrollment: Adult Education 
Baltimore City: February, 1956 



Type of Class 




Total 

Americanization 

Elementary 

Secondary 

Commercial (Distributive Education) .... 
Vocational: 

Industrial 

Home Economics 

Parent Education 

Industrial Training (General) 

Informal Program (Noncredit) 

Vocational Education (Veterans) 

Foremanship and Apprentice Training. . . 

Total Number of Principals and Teachers 



148 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



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150 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 86 — Participation and Reimbursement Paid : Special School Milk Program : 
Maryland Public Schools : 1955-56 





JN umber of 


Fer Cent of 1 otal 


lotal Number 






Approved Schools 


Schools in State 


of One-Half 


Reimbursement 


County 


Participating 


Participating 


Pints Milk 


Paid 




in Program 


in Program 


R gI m bu, rs3. t) 1 G 




Total State 


772 


82.2 


21,833,604 


$820,471 




33 


97.1 


649,504 


25,980 




66 


100.0 


1,950,820 


74,752 




160 


98.1 


6,104,418 


219,350 




64 


78.0 


3,395.490 


131,698 


Calvert 


9 


56.3 


83,770 


2,740 




1 


7.7 


9,224 


323 


Carroll 


20 


95.2 


295,408 


11,541 


Cecil 


20 


83.3 


194,367 


7,247 




9 


47.4 


213,950 


7,537 


Dorchester 


6 


19.3 


116,557 


3,342 


Frederick 


39 


100.0 


293,634 


11,368 


Garrett 


10 


47.6 


250,715 


9,421 


Harford 


23 


100.0 


670,797 


25,894 




17 


100.0 


535,731 


21,283 


Kent 


16 


100.0 


201,204 


5,376 


Montgomery 


87 


96.7 


2,631,865 


101,708 




97 


93.3 


3,041,991 


119,552 




14 


93.3 


120,689 


4,494 


St. Mary's 












"7 


B1.8 


50,582 


1,633 


Talbot 


7 


35.0 


99,255 


3,875 


Washington 


43 


95.5 


596.114 


23,480 


Wicomico 


22 


100.0 


296,595 


7,025 


Worcester 


2 


11.8 


30.924 


852 



Maryland State Department of Education 



151 



TABLE 87 



-Capital Outlay* for Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1956 



County 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 
Baltimore City. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's. ... 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington. . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Expenditures for Capital Outlay 



Total 


Elementary 


High 


$49,737,925 


$22,316,548 


$27,317,644 


1.093,079 
2,799 371 
10.430.536 
11.128,081 
51.727 


126,930 
2,079,929 
4,182,093 
5,693,710 
42,167 


966,149 
702,140 
6,236,846 
5,414,264 
9.560 


2.637 
713,557 
1,076,496 
656,801 
76.764 


500 
84,520 
765.218 
450.010 
12,585 


2,137 
629,037 
309,676 
206,791 
64,179 


312,228 
120,441 
1,178,299 
88.131 
35.033 


325.778 
120.307 
612.163 
7,882 
15,499 


586,450 
134 

561,605 
80,249 
19,534 


7,770,939 
6,525,860 
346,958 
547,913 
89.738 


3,223,256 
2,323.489 
338,277 
173,329 
30,099 


4,537,549 
4,171,721 
7,367 
374,584 
59.639 


466.891 
2,878.861 
395,229 
352,355 


71,921 
1,118,115 
241,545 
277,226 


394,970 
1,760,746 
153,684 
68,633 



* Includes purchase of additional automobiles and buses, for which see TABLE XVTII. 



152 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 88 

Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed Valuation; 

June 30, 1956 



County 



School Bonded Indebtedness as of 
June 30, 1956 



Total 



! County 
i Bonds 



State 
Loan* 



1955 Assessed 
Valuation 
Taxable at 
Full Rate for 
County 
Purposes 



Assessed 
Valuation 

per Dollar of 
School 
Bonded 

Indebtedness 



I Per Cent 
I School 
! Bonded 
, Indebtedness 
] Is of Assessed 
Valuation 



Total State 



$255,397,802 $200,965,849 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 



Caroline. . . 
Carrol! . . . . 

Cecil 

Charles. . . , 
Dorchester. 



Frederick 
Garrett. . 
Harford . 
Howard . 
Kent. . . . 



Montgomery . . 
Prince George's' 
Queen Anne's . I 
St Mary's. . . . ! 

Somerset 

i 

Talbot ! 

Washington ... I 

Wicomico ! 

Worcester ' 



6,595,470 
20,728,388 
t61,012,000 
55,928,066 

1,195,967 

484,680 
2,183,467 
3,323,758 
1,414,272 
3,341,603 

4,313,461 
1,549,933 
5,892,191 
2,703,316 
1,091,343 

39,516,450 
27,792,390 
1,441,304 
992,939 
888,348 

2,340,033 
3,559,918 
5,568,507 
1,540,000 



2.724,000 
15,757,000 
61,012,000 
42,149,000 
698,000 

! 30,000 
I 900,000 
I 2,870,000 
554.000 
I 2,497,300 

2,081,000 
975,000 
I 4,752,500 
I 1,592,453 
I 600,000 

i 32,147,596 
21,922,000 
909,000 



1,000 

1,400,000 
70,000 
4,224,000 
1,100,000 



$54,431,953 

3,871,470 
4,971,386 

13,779,066 
497,967 

454,680 
1,283,467 
453,758 
860,272 
844,303 

2.232,461 
574,933 
1.139,691 
1,110,863 
491,343 

7,368^54 
5,870,390 
532,304 
992,939 
887,348 

940,033 
3,489,918 
1,344,507 

440,000 



$6,095,546,503 

n46,650,656 
1220,594,254 
^2,370,878,895 
1989,294,315 
16,671.515 

26,933.143 
87,738,766 
t77,578,135 
130,627,704 
59,480,145 

I tl27,616,485 
I 29,458,198 
1125,964,847 
43,716,610 
26,159,520 

J759,341.810 
496.276,780 
35,068,759 ; 
31,405,662 ' 
21,292,815 

43,987,330 
1181,157,545 
88,499,800 
59,152,810 



$24 

22 
11 
39 
18 
14 

56 
40 
23 
22 
18 

30 
19 
21 
16 
24 

19 
18 
24 
32 
24 

19 
51 
16 

38 



4.2 

4.5 
9.4 
2.6 
5.7 
7.2 

1.8 
2.5 



4.3 
4.6 
5.6 

3.4 
5.3 
4.7 
6.2 
4.2 



5.3 
2.0 
6.3 
2.6 



* General School Construction Loan. 

t Includes sinking fund balance of $2,479,881. 

I Excludes valuation of Federal Housing Authority. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



153 



TABLE 89— Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness* and Interest Payments 
per Pupil Belonging: June 30, 1956 



COUXTY 



School 
Bonded 
Indebtedness 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore. . . . 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorcheste'. . . 



$536.85 

424.57 
712.96 
415.10 
888.91 
348.54 

123.51 
234.54 
402.07 
229.05 
615.99 



Interest 
Payments 



$11.03 

7.74 
9.52 
8.58 
20.43 
10.16 

2.21 
3.01 
6.81 
4.83 
14.90 



County 



Frederick . . . . 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's . . . . 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



School 
Bonded 
Indebtedness 



$351.65 
335.95 
447.73 
492.95 
363.97 

751.97 
558.72 
442.66 
217.59 
222.99 

612.19 
269.39 
669.84 
316.34 



Interest 
Payments 



$3.29 
6.07 
8.67 
9.46 
7.18 

17.47 
11.94 
8.33 
2.95 
3.79 

5.35 
4.66 
15.54 
6.65 



* Includes General School Construction Loan. 



154 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 90 — Value* of Maryland School Property per Pupil Belonging : 
Year Ending June 30, 1956 



County 


Total 


Elementary 


High 


Total 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total 
Value 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total 
Value 


Average 
per Pupil 




Value 




$385,555,743 


$807.28 


$178,619,862 


$586.84 


$206,935,881 


$1,194.64 


Allegany 


14,306,700 


920.97 


5,323,580 


636.25 


8,983,120 


1,253.37 


Anne Arundel . . . 


25,668,477 


882.88 


11,173,877 


608.70 


14,494,600 


1,352.54 


Baltimore Cityt 


89,102,810 


606.21 


42,690,084 


434.62 


46,412,726 


951.88 


Baltimore 


55,955,076 


889.33 


28,139,122 


724.85 


27,815,954 


1,154.31 


Calvert 


2,149,400 


626.39 


1,055,900 


483.56 


1,093,500 


876.34 




2,455,000 


625.59 


1,255,000 


533.23 


1.200,000 


763.99 


Carroll 


7,662,500 


823.07 


3,509,800 


655.01 


4,152,700 


1,051.00 


Cecil 


8,704,600 


1,052.97 


4,519,840 


861.79 


4,184,760 


1,384.77 


Charles 


5,970,150 


966.92 


2,749,100 


726.47 


3,221,050 


1,347.61 


Dorchester 


8,115,880 


1,496.07 


2,956,380 


896.36 


5,159.500 


2,426.17 


Frederick 


8,065,625 


657.54 


4,531,440 


629.96 


3,534,185 


696.64 


Garrett 


4,200,410 


910.44 


1,367,710 


515.55 


2,832,700 


1,444.74 


Harford 


15,694,365 


1,192.57 


6,254,365 


763.30 


9,440,000 


1,900.81 




3,572,300 


651.41 


1,797,220 


550.40 


1,775,380 


800.09 


Kent 


2,209,200 


736.79 


993,550 


552.68 


1,215,650 


1,012.45 


Montgomery .... 


48,844,056 


929.47 


19,391,090 


538.65 


29,452,966 


1,779.54 


Prince George's . 


41,576,302 


835.83 


20,217,745 


641.66 


21,358,557 


1,171.31 


Queen Anne's. . . 


2,832,900 


870.05 


1,489,675 


768.15 


1,343,225 


1,020.15 


St. Mary's 


2,512,265 


550.52 


1,656,500 


539.87 


855,765 


572.88 


Somerset 


3,108,920 


780.39 


850,890 


355.54 


2,258,030 


1,419.61 


Talbot 


3,775,360 


987.69 


1,470,710 


651.56 


2,304,650 


1,472.43 


Washington 


13,208,570 


779.92 


8,066,943 


804.69 


5,141,627 


743.99 


Wicomifo 


11,397,877 


1,371.06 


5,227,541 


1,023.66 


6,170,336 


1,924.32 


Worcester 


4,'.-a7,000 


917.59 


1,931,800 


646.82 


2,535,200 


1,347.36 



* Value based on 100 per cent of the insured valuation for each school building and the equipment 
thereof. Value of sites has been excluded. 

t Baltimore City shows value of buildings and equipment as carried by the Bureau of Accounts and 
Disbursements; this valuation does not constitute the basis for insurance. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



155 



TABLE 91 



Calculated School Tax Rates and Published Tax Rates : State of Maryland : 1955-56 



County 


Calculated Public School Tax Rates* 

' 1 Debt Service 
Total 1 Current i and Capital 
; Expenses | Outiay 


1 

Published 
Tax Ratest 


Additional 

Rates in 
Districts and 
Incorporated 

Places t 


Total State 


$1 


41 


$1.16 


$0 


25 








Allegany 


1 


39 


1.08 





31 


$2.05 


$0.10— $1.50 


Anne Arundel ° 


1 


53 


al.26 





27 


1 


84 


0.35— 1.39 


Baltimore City° 


1 


30 


1.18 





12 


3 


05 




Baltimore ° 


1 


38 


al.l6 





22 


1 


98 




Calvert 


2 


01 


al.l5 





86 


1 


96 


0.75^1.00 


Caroline 


1 


02 


0.95 





07 


1 


60 


0.25— 1.15 


Carroll ° 


1 


26 


0.90 





36 


1 


56 


0.50— 0.82 


Cecil 


1 


12 


aO.92 





20 


1 


45 


0.20— 1.33 


Charles 


1 


57 


al.OO 





57 


1 


55 


0.50— 0.80 


Dorchester ° 


1 


23 


0.94 





29 


1 


75 


0.11— 0.80 




1 


12 


O0.99 





13 


1 


40 


0.10— 1.50 


Garrett ° 


1 


22 


0.77 





45 


2 


00 


0.40— 0.90 


Harford ° 


1 


21 


aO.87 





34 


1 


43 


1.00— 1.10 


Howard ° 


1 


42 


al.04 





38 


1 


85 




Kent° 


1 


57 


1.13 





44 


1 


75 


0.10—0.80 




1 


64 


al.28 





36 


2 


03 


0.05— 1.00 




1 


79 


01.28 





51 


2 


15 


0.05— 1.71 


Queen Anne's" 


1 


29 


0.99 





30 


1 


87 


0.20— 0.90 


St. Mary's 


1 


05 


aO.79 





26 


1 


50 


0.90 


Somerset 


1 


09 


0.98 





11 


1 


80 


0.80— 1.50 


Talbot 


1 


25 


0.91 





34 


1 


85 


0.20— 1.25 


Washington" 




32 


al.l3 





19 


1 


75 


0.35— 0.85 




i 


65 


1.02 





63 


1 


90 


0.30— 1.17 




1 


55 


aO.95 





60 


1. 


65 


0.95— 1.40 



* Calculated by dividing tax funds received by County Boards of Education by total as.se3sed valua- 
tions as used in calculation of State aid payments. 

t Rates are for fiscal period on which district operates. State property tax and special service levies 
are excluded. 

t Figures are from reports made to State Fiscal Research Bureau. 
° Calendar year fiscal period. 

a Excludes federal funds authorized by PubMc Law 874 as amended. 



156 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 92 

Local Revenue Appropriations: Maryland Public Schools: 1955-56 



County 


Local 
Revenue* 


Appropriations for Public Schools 


Per Cent of Total Revenue Ap- 
propriated FOR Public Schools 


All School 
Purposes 


Current 
Expenses 


Debt 
Service 


Capital 
Outlay 


All 

School 
Purposes 


Current 
Expenses 


Debt 
Service 


Capital 
Outlay 


Total State 


$231,313,371 


$90,191,017 


$73,973,559 


$13,647,640 


$2,569,818 


39 





32 





5.9 


' 

l.l ! 


Allcganv 


5,658,750 


2,125,034 


1,651,227 


464,807 


9,000 


37 


5 


29 


2 


8.2 


0.1 i 


Anne ArundelJ 


7,830,280 


3,384,157 


2,623,456 


753,201 


7,500 


43 


2 


33 


5 


9.6 


0.1 ^ 


Baltimore Cityt 


111,891,269 


32,338,735 


29,389,592 


2,774,143 


175,000 


28 


9 


26 


3 


2.5 


0.1 


Ballinioret 


27,067,672 


14,900,944 


12,040,951 


2,634,190 


225,803 


55 





44 


5 


9.7 


0.8 




721,490 


359,429 


206,059 


106,370 


47,000 


49 


8 


28 


6 


14.7 


6.5 i 


Caroline 


1,069,303 


305,230 


284,106 


21,124 




28 


5 


26 


6 


1.9 




CarrollJ 


2,607,335 


1,170.003 


882; 357 


135,767 


151,939 


44 


8 


33 


8 


5.2 


'5^8 J 


Cecil 


2,910,059 


946,177 


772,845 


128,932 


44,400 


32 


5 


26 


5 


4.5 


1.5 •,! 


Charles 


1,268,635 


530,697 


339,269 


111,428 


80,000 


41 


8 


26 




8.8 


6.3 1 


Dorchestert 


1,588.933 


752,602 


573,859 


178,743 




47 


3 


36 


1 


11.2 




FrederickJ 


4,173,383 


1,585,275 


1,386,457 


103,131 


35,687 


37 


9 


33 


2 


3.9 


0.8 


Garreitt 


1,397,779 


373,492 


232,126 


109,451 


31,915 


26 


7 


16 


6 


7.8 


2.3 


Harfordt 


3,186,101 


1,538,885 


1,143,443 


326,313 


69,129 


48 


3 


35 


9 


10.2 


2.2 


Howardt 

KentJ 


1,405,564 


625,055 


467,787 


130,227 


27,041 


44 


4 


33 


3 


9.2 


1.9 


869,176 


413,388 


298,619 


107,125 


7,044 


47 


5 


34 


3 


12.3 


0.9 


Montgomery 


23,729,656 


12,819,921 


9,971,154 


2,398,137 


450,630 


54 





42 





10.1 


1.9 


Prince George's 


18,035,118 


9,181,836 


6,560,587 


1,971,124 


650,125 


50 


9 


30 


4 


10.9 


3.6 




1,20,3,351 


480,189 


361,369 


92,926 


25,894 


39 


9 


30 





7.7 


2.2 


St. Murv's 


1,214,908 


353,530 


266,000 


72,159 


15,311 


29 





21 


9 


5.9 


1.2 


Somerset 


863,590 


249.444 


224,188 


21,314 


942 


28 


9 


26 





2.8 


0.1 


Talbot 


1,592.009 


508,406 


414,558 


146,315 


7,533 


35 


7 


26 





9.2 


0.5 


Wasliingtonj 


5,537,711 


2,691,013 


2,340,577 


166,986 


183,4.50 


48 


6 


42 


3 


3.0 


3.3 




3,422,211 


1,542,173 


950,042 


528,327 


57,204 


45 





27 


9 


15.4 


1.7 




2,009,028 


955,342 


586,271 


102.400 


266,671 


46 


1 


28 


3 


4.9 


12.9 



* Figures from State Fiscal Research Bureau; iucludes taxes, licenses and permits, and fines and forfeitures. 

t Fij^urcs from annual financial reports of County Departments of Education adjusted to conform to count>'s fiscal period. 

t County operates on calendar year. Revenue here reported is that of 1955. 



Maryiand State Department of Education 



157 



TABLE 93— Assessable Wealth Back of Each Maryland Public School Pupil 

Belonging: 1955-56 





Total Basis Assessable at 


Number of 




County 


Full Rate for County 


Pupils Belongingt 


Wealth per Pupil 




Purposes 




Total State 


$6,130,754,887 


477,597 


$12,837 


Allegany 


146,685,047 


15.534 


9,443 




220,765,471 


29,074 


7,593 


Baltimore City* 


2.394,886,879 


146,982 


16,294 


Baltimore* 


994,704,318 


62,918 


15.809 


Calvert 


16,671,515 


3,431 


4,859 


Caroline 


26,933,143 


3,924 


6,864 


Carroll* 


87,738,766 


9,310 


9,424 


Cecil 


78,262,685 


8,267 


9,467 


Charles 


30,688,844 


6,174 


4,971 


Dorchester* 


59,480,145 


5.425 


10,964 


Frederick* 


127,787,056 


12,267 


10,417 


Garrett* 


29,458,198 


4,614 


6,385 


Harford* 


129,799,653 


13,160 


9,863 


Howard* 


43,716,610 


5,484 


7,972 


Kent* 


26,159,520 


2,998 


8,726 


Montgomery 


759,751,810 


52,550 


14,458 


Prince George's 


496,276,780 


49,743 


9,977 


Queen Anne's* 


35,068,759 


3,256 


10,771 


St. Mary's 


31,405,662 


4,563 


6,883 




21,292,815 


3,984 


5,345 


Talbot 


43,987,330 


3,822 


11,509 


Washington* 


181,581,271 


16,936 


10,722 


Wicomico 


88,499,800 


8,313 


10,646 


Worcester 


59,152,810 


4,868 


12,151 



* Calendar year (1955^. 

t Includes kindergarten and prekindergarten pupils. 




158 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 94 

1955-56 Valuation of Property Assessable at Full Rate for County Purposes : 

State of Maryland 



County 



Total 
Assessable at 
Full Rate* 



by 

Local Public 
Authority 



Federal 
Housing 
Authority 



by 
State Tax 
Commissiont 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel ° 
Baltimore City*^ 
Baltimore" . . . . 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll ° 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester °. . . 

Frederick ° . . . . 

Garrett ° 

Harford ° 

Howard" 

Kent° 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's°. 
St. Mary's. . . . 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington" . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$6,130,754,887 

146,685,047 
220,765,471 
2,394,886,879 
994,704,318 
16,671,515 

26,933,143 
87,738,766 
78,262,685 
30,688,844 
59,480,145 

127,787,056 
29,458,198 

129,799,653 
43,716,610 
26,159,520 

759,751,810 
496,276,780 
35,068,759 
31,405,662 
21,292,815 

43,987,330 
181,581,271 
88,499,800 
59,152,810 



$4,819,810,723 

105,021,856 
196,339,064 
1,817,976,049 
745,485,145 
14,641,435 

21,752,683 
66,718,786 
54,064,785 
25,509,644 
41,196,025 

94,400,975 
20,188,948 
91,296,007 
33,941,560 
21,551,850 

686,852,200 
428,656.390 
30,262,449 
25,325.522 
17,094,625 

37,162,990 
129,805,505 
64,903,820 
49.662.410 



$35,208,384 

34,391 
171,217 
24,007,980 
5,410,003 



684,550 
61,140 



170,571 
3,834,806 



410.000 



423,726 



$1,275,735,780 

41,628,800 
24,255,190 
552,902,850 
243,809,170 
2,030,080 

5,180,460 
21,019,980 
23,513,350 

5,118,060 
18,284,120 

33,215,510 
9,269,250 

34,668,840 
9,775,050 
4,607,670 

72,489,610 
67,620,390 
4,806,310 
6,080,140 
4.198,190 

6,824,340 
51,352,040 
23,595,980 

9,490,400 



* Excludes classes A through J motor vehicles. 

t Data are for the year ended December 31, 1955, adjusted as of October, 1956 

X Estimated by dividing net receipts after distribution to incorporated towns and places by the county 
tax rate. 

° Fiscal period ends December 31; all others end June 30, 



Maryland State Department of Education 



159 



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Ninetieth Annual Report 



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triculated 




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ulated 


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167 



TABLE 103 

Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1947-1956 







Current Expenses 




Average Annual Cost per 
Student 


Year 
Ending 


Average 
Enroll- 
ment 


Total 


Paid by 
Students 


Paid by 
State 




Total 


In Student 
Fees* 


To 
State 



BOWIE 



1947 


124 


$108,230 


$17,809 


$90,421 


$873 


$144 


$729 


1948 


152 


163,153 


22,972 


140,181 


1,073 


151 


922 


1949 


157 


172,046 


28,341 


143,705 


1,096 


181 


915 


1950 


207 


212,373 


26,353 


186,020 


1,026 


127 


899 


1951 


218 


226,790 


33,750 


193,040 


1,040 


155 


885 


1952 


262 


261,264 


32,810 


228,454 


997 


125 


872 


1953 


331 


316,737 


59,506 


257,231 


957 


180 


777 


1954 


343 


351,712 


72,599 


279,113 


1,025 


211 


814 


1955 


338 


363,046 


75,092 


287,954 


1,074 


222 


852 


1956 


321 


388,296 


71,585 


316,711 


1,210 


223 


987 



COPPIN 



1952. 
1953. 
1954. 
1955. 
1956. 



177 


$59,415 




$59,415 


$336 




$336 


197 


126,-542 


$5,390 


121.152 


642 


$27 


615 


236 


159,193 


8,103 


151,090 


674 


34 


640 


267 


172,823 


9,625 


163,198 


647 


36 


611 


295 


199,662 


9,148 


190,514 


677 


31 


646 



frostburg 



1947 


243 


$152,531 


$30,820 


$121,711 


$628 


$127 


$501 


1948 


225 


210,925 


40,024 


170,901 


937 


178 


759 


1949 


270 


236,332 


54,730 


181,602 


875 


203 


672 


1950 


374 


262.317 


50,021 


212,296 


701 


134 


567 


1951 


339 


316.664 


57,636 


259,028 


934 


170 


764 


1952 


338 


318,342 


42,462 


275,880 


942 


126 


816 


1953 


373 


402,258 


88,372 


313,886 


1,078 


237 


841 


1954 


394 


418,682 


58,716 


359,966 


1,063 


149 


914 


1955 


458 


459,180 


57,667 


401,513 


1,003 


126 


877 


1956 


564 


484,506 


65,589 


418.917 


859 

1 


116 


743 



SALISBURY 



1947 


1 

280 


$145,226 


$46,960 


$98,266 


$519 


$168 


$351 


1948 


273 


191,221 


64,408 


126,813 


700 


236 


464 


1949 


258 


231,054 


54,557 


176,497 


895 


211 


684 


1950 


286 


270,107 


55,342 


214,765 


944 


194 


750 


1951 


200 


268,942 


38,999 


229,943 


1,345 


195 


1,150 


1952 


174 


282,935 


22,765 


260,170 


1,626 


131 


1,495 


1953 


234 


349,424 


54,129 


295,295 


1,493 


231 


1,262 


1954 


250 


343,124 


41,983 


301,141 


1,372 


168 


1,204 


1955 


338 


386,826 


64,918 


321,908 


1,144 


192 


952 


1956 


362 


416,580 


68,945 


347,635 


1,151 


191 


960 



towson 



1947 


454 


$325,098 


$64,302 


$260,796 


$716 


$142 


$574 


1948 


625 


430,679 


102,645 


328,034 


689 


164 


525 


1949 


750 


469,299 


84,996 


384,303 


626 


113 


513 


1950 


885 


599,879 


93,495 


506,384 


678 


106 


572 


1951 


879 


633,145 


107,164 


525,981 


720 


122 


598 


1952 


855 


757,257 


92,816 


664,441 


886 


109 


777 


1953 


851 


842,915 


121.076 


721,839 


990 


142 


848 


1954 


893 


962,662 


135,050 


827,612 


1,078 


151 


927 


1955 


1,033 


1,024,421 


173,733 


850,638 


992 


168 


824 


1956 


1,170 


1,120,202 


180,904 


939,298 


957 


154 


803 



* In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Laws of 3945, tuition for teacher training students at the 
Teachers Colleges was eliminated as of September, 1945. Beginning in 1955-56 board is $216 at Frost- 
burg, Salisbury, Towson, and Bowie for teacher training students planning to teach in Maryland. 
Junior college students who are residents of Maryland pay $100 additional, out-of-state students, $200. 



168 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 104— Source of Expenditures*: Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 
Year Ending June 30, 1956 



State 
Teachers 
College 



Total 

Bowie . . . 
Coppin . . 
Frostburg 
Salisbury 
Towson . . 



Grand 
Total 



2,609,246 
388,296 
199,662 
484,506 
416,580 

1,120,202 



Total Expenditures for Current Expenses Paid by 



State Students 



$ 

2,213,075 
315,711 
190,514 
418,917 
347,635 
939,298 



396,171 
71,585 
9,148 
65,589 
68,945 

180,904 



General Adminis- 
tration 



State 



326,485 
53,580 
38,139 
53,508 
50,322 

130,936 



Students 



^.269 



865 



8,404 



Instruction 



State 



194,002 
145,038 
109,599 
232,566 
182,781 
524,018 



Students 



65,214 
1,160 
115 
14,733 
14,421 
34,785 



Dietary Service 



State 



209,252 
31,647 
11,211 
39,024 
37,801 
89,569 



Students 



218,989 
44,829 
8,553 
36,867 
35,397 
93,343 



Plant Operation j| 
and Maintenance 



State 



483,336 
86,446 
31,565 
93,819 
76,731 

194,775 



Students 



25 we 

480 
13,124 
19,127 
44.372 



Current year cash disbursements and encumbrances less budget credits. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



169 



TABLE 105 — Inventories at Maryland State Department of Education, Teachers' 
Retirement System, and State Teachers Colleges : June 30, 1956 



Department or College 


Total 


Land and 
Improvements 


Buildings 


Equipment 


Total 


$11,483,214 


$1,122,802 


$8,695,537 


$1,664,875 


State Department of Education 


293,893 






293,893 


Teachers' Retirement System 


17,770 






17,770 


State Teachers College, Bowie 


2,196,264 


94,247 


1,900,609 


201,408 


State Teachers College, Coppin 


933,746 


280,000 


544,360 


109,386 


State Teachers College, Frostburg .... 


2,881,279 


381,025 


2,228,636 


271,618 


State Teachers College, Salisbury 


1,960,472 


132,536 


1,601,765 


226,171 


State Teachers College, Towson 


3,199,790 


234,994 


2,420,167 


544,629 



170 Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 106 — Maryland Teachers' Retirement System: Members in Active Service 
and Their Contributions: Year Ending July 31, 1956 



County or Institution 



Amount Contributed 
Year Ending 
July 31, 1956 



Grand Total 

Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery (including Jr. Colleges) 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington (including Jr. College) . , 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Total Schools and Departments 

Teachers Colleges 

Bowie 

Coppin 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 

Towson 

Departments 

County Libraries 

Education 

Retirement 

Other Schools 

Barrett School for Girls 

Md. School for the Deaf 

Md. Training School for Boys 

Montrose School for Girls 

Rosewood State Training S'^hoo! .... 
St. Mary's Seminary — Junior College 



$2,832,169.44 

$2,693,133.58 

145,584.28 
204,893.06 
518,308.69 
26,101.98 
39,774.37 

65,206.15 
57,144.63 
48,078.18 
43,706.70 
85.421.76 

40,875.22 
107,117.94 
48,532.09 
28,728.09 
458,196.30 

378.924.14 
31.859.24 
29,773.90 
38,908.27 
35,649.28 

154,197.76 
70,468.05 
40,683.50 

$139,035.86 

$65,644.75 

7,378.60 
5.424.90 

12,565.80 
9.444.20 

30,831.25 

$49,347.54 

18,809.05 
30,285.89 
252.60 

$24,043.57 

951.38 
6,373.59 
7,391.38 
2 602.88 
2,720.90 
4,003.44 



Maryland State Department of Education 



171 



TABLE 107 — Parent-Teacher Associations: Maryland County Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1956 









J. d V-ztrlll/ XXdVlIl^ 


County 


Total Number 


Parent-Teacher 


Parent-Teacher 




Schools 


Associations 


Associations 




'7'7R 


( Oo 


y < . u 


Allegany 


34 


29 


85.3 




65 


65 


100.0 


Baltimore 


82 


82 


100.0 


Calvert 


16 


16 


100.0 




13 


13 


100.0 


Carroll 


21 


20 


95.2 


Cecil 


24 


22 


91.7 


Charles 


19 


19 


100.0 


Dorchester 


31 


25 


80.6 


Frederick 


39 


35 


89.7 


Garrett 


21 


21 


100.0 


Harford 


23 


23 


100.0 




17 


17 


100.0 


Kent 


16 


16 


100.0 


Montgomery 


90 


90 


100.0 


Prince George's 


104 


102 


98.1 


Queen Anne's 


15 


15 


100.0 


St. Mary's 


20 


17 


85.0 


Somerset 


22 


22 


100.0 


Talbot 


20 


20 


100.0 


Washington 


45 


45 


100.0 


Wicomico 


22 


22 


100.0 


Worcester 


17 


17 


100.0 



172 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 108— Enrollment in Baltimore City Summer Schools: 1947-56; 
By Type cf School : 1956 









Net Roll at End of Session 




School Year 


Number 


Total 




Taking 


Number of 




of 


Enroll- 








Principals 


Type of School 


Schools 


ment 


Total 






and 1^1 










Review 


Advance 


Teachers 










Work 


Work 




All Schools 














1946-47 


12 


6,851 


6,159 


5,428 


731 


122 


1947-48 


12 


6,565 


6,039 


5,287 


752 


146 


1948-49* 


5 


3,686 


3,421 


2,895 


526 


86 


1949-50 


5 


4,222 


3,865 


3,275 


590 


92 


1950-51 


5 


4,010 


3,628 


2,990 


638 


78 


1951-52 


5 


4,145 


3,710 


3,258 


452 


80 


1952-53 


5 


4,234 


3,945 


3,564 


381 


80 


1953-54 


5 


4,726 


4,373 


3,954 


419 


80 


1954-55 


5 


5,454 


4,990 


4,586 


404 


84 


1955-56 


5 


5,870 


5,257 


4,943 


314 


87 


Secondary 


3 


5,605 


4,999 


4,943 


56 


75 


Senior 


2 


2,899 


2,670 


2,614 


56 


41 


Junior 


1 


2,706 


2,329 


2,329 




34 


Demonstration. . . . 


2 


265 


258 




258 


12 



* No elementary review schools beginning 1948-49. 



mAyland State Department of Education 



173 



TABLE 109— High School Equivalence : State of Maryland : 1947-1956 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Number of Applicants Who 


Total Number 
of 

Certificates 
Issued 


Completed 
Examination* 


Earned 
Certificate 


Earned Certificate 
through USAFIf 


1947 


2,411 


1,169 




1,169 


1948 


1,469 


1,082 


"443 


1,525 


1949 


1,129 


831 


457 


1,288 


1950 


1,081 


747 


332 


1,079 


1951 


912 


648 


291 


939 


1952 


779 


527 


580 


1,107 


1953 


1,005 


700 


613 


1,313 


1954 


1,377 


887 


837 


1,724 


1955 


1,495 


885 


717 


1,602 


1956 


1,476 


854 


967 


1,821 



* Includes re-tests. 

t United States Armed Forces Institute. 



174 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 110 — Vocational Rehabilitation Services Rendered; 

Year Ending June 30, 1956 



State of Maryland 





Total 


Reha- 


Being 


Training 


Being 


SuTveyedt 


Closed: 


County 


Number 


bilitated 


Followed 


Completed 


Prepared 


Being 


Other 




Cases 




on Jobs 


for Jobs 


Counseled 


Services 


Total State . . 


4,507 


1,174 


88 


470 


903 


1,359 


513 


Allegany 


123 


31 




30 


29 


25 


8 




145 


41 


*2 


20 


24 


45 


13 


Baltimore City 


2,198 


518 


35 


212 


452 


681 


300 


Baltimore 


270 


73 


5 


10 


61 


86 


35 


Calvert 


16 


3 




1 


2 


10 




Caroline 


63 


17 




6 


13 


26 


1 


Carroll 


50 


15 


'4 


7 


11 


9 


4 




74 


22 


4 


3 


15 


27 


3 


Charles 


30 


6 




2 


9 


10 


3 


Dorchester 


88 


24 


*i 


10 


12 


24 


17 




142 


67 




9 


25 


21 


20 


Garrett 


47 


12 




6 


18 


11 




Harford 


78 


20 




8 


17 


26 


■7 




25 


8 


i 


4 


2 




10 


Kent 


37 


13 


8 


5 


5 


io 


1 


Montgomery 


229 


70 


6 


34 


39 


74 


6 




331 


96 


11 


49 


63 


93 


19 


37 


9 


1 


7 


9 


9 


2 




33 


8 




2 


6 


16 


1 


Somerset 


43 


14 


3 


5 


9 


8 


4 


Talbot 


37 


10 


1 


3 


7 


10 


6 




201 


42 


5 


19 


39 


71 


25 




172 


42 


4 


14 


30 


59 


23 


Worcester 


38 


13 


2 


4 


6 


8 


5 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SER\^D 



Characteristic 



Total 



Reha- 
bilitated* 



Othert 



Characteristic 



Total 



Reha- 
bilitated* 



Total Number . . . 

Under 21 

21—30 

31—40 

41—50 

Over 50 

Education 

None 

1—3 

4—6 

7—9 

10—12 

H. S. Graduate 

13—14 

15—16 

College 

Unknown 

Dependents 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

Over 5 



4,507 

1,098 
860 
990 
890 
669 

73 
261 
821 
1,658 
1,018 
406 
96 
78 
37 
59 

2,617 

662 
427 
304 
203 
119 
175 



1,174 

254 
253 
273 
238 
156 

19 
45 
184 
451 
285 
116 
30 
24 
13 
7 

624 
188 
123 
91 
61 
33 
54 



3,333 

844 
607 
717 
652 
513 

54 
216 
637 
1,207 
733 
290 
66 
54 
24 
52 

1,993 
474 
304 
213 
142 
86 
121 



Race 

Wliite 

Negro 

Other 

Sex 

Male 

Female 

Marital Status 

Single 

Married 

Other 

Employment History 

(at Survey) 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Never Worked .... 

Worked at 

Sometime 

Number on Welfare . 
(at Survey) 



3,189 
1,315 
3 

3,110 
1,397 

1,998 
1,708 
801 



322 
4.185 



620 



875 
297 
2 

787 
387 

468 

483 
223 



188 
986 
140 

846 

113 



* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (1,174). 
t Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (3,333). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



175 



TABLE 111 — Cost of Vocational Rehabilitation Case Services Rendered: 
State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1956 



Type of Service 


Number of 


Average 


Total 




Clients 


Cost 


Expenditure 


Total Expenditure 






$325,856 


Examinations 










],648 


$10.55 


17,399 


Psychiatric 


48 


14.11 


678 


Surgery and Treatment 








Medical 


63 


30.87 


1,945 


Psychiatric 


30 


59.43 


1,783 




193 


92.99 


17,948 


Dental 


45 


82.15 


3,697 


Physical and occupational therapy 


80 


142.34 


11,388 


Prosthetic Appliances 








Artificial limbs 


158 


233.91 


36,958 


Braces 


112 


64.43 


7,217 


Hearing aids 


69 


87.00 


6,003 


Glasses and artificial eyes 


93 


17.96 


1,671 


Surgical appliances 


79 


28.25 


2,232 


Wheel chairs, hand and power perated 


33 


43.33 


1,430 


Hospitalization and Convalescent Care 








Hospitalization 


153 


262.25 


40 125 


Convalescent home care 


19 


106.53 


2^024 


Nursing care in client's residence 


5 


222.10 


1,111 


Training and Training Materials 








Personal adjustment training 


93 


53.40 


4,966 


Educational institutions 


446 


165.58 


73.851 


Employment ' 


44 


32.16 


1,415 


Correspondence 


77 


44.83 


3,452 


Tutorial 


54 


45.75 


2,471 


Training materials 


338 


29.84 


10,088 


Maintenance and Transportation 








Maintenance 








Training 


307 


169.02 


51,890 


Medical or physical restoration 


65 


76.06 


4,944 


Inter-current illness 








Placement 


"58 


19.86 


1,152 


Transportation 








Training 


398 


28.44 


11,323 


Medical or physical restoration 


115 


7.83 


901 


Occupational Tools and Equipment (Clients) 


34 


119.82 


4,074 


Miscellaneous (Other) 


20 


85.96 


1,720 



176 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



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177 



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1,928,933 

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3.500 
26.666 
1,500 


$860,865 

40.171 

197.160 
24,361 
11,485 
8.672i 
26,025 
8.4381 
289,864 
164.810 
9 000 


14,003 
9,241 
40,000 
17,635 


$3,243,040 

68,452 
2,142,464 
240,538 
31,424 
15,957 
13,170 
36,320 
12,825 
312,880 
200,919 
13,196 
22,258 
22,871 
82.705 
27.061 



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178 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE 114 — Amount of and per Pupil Expenditures by Boards of Education from 
Public Funds for School Library Books : State of Maryland : 
Year Ending June 30, 1956 



Public Expenditures for School Library Books 



County 


Amount 


Per Pupil Belonging 


Total 


Elementary 


High 


Total 


Elementary 


High 


Total State 


$431,541 


$255,114 


$176,427 


$.90 


$ .84 


$1.02 


Allegany 


9,241 


3,990 


5,251 


.59 


.48 


.73 


Anne Arundel. . . 


13,753 


4,305 


9,448 


.47 


.23 


.88 


Baltimore City. . 


93,637 


66,591 


27,046 


.64 


.68 


.55 


Baltimore 


107,336 


70,126 


37,210 


1.71 


1.81 


1.54 


Calvert 


2,395 


1,296 


1,099 


.70 


.59 


.88 


Caroline 














Carroll 


8,241 


4,453 


3,788 


' '.89 


' .83 


' .96 


Cecil 


8,187 


4,447 


3,740 


.99 


.85 


1.24 


Charles 


6,947 


4,270 


2,677 


1.13 


1.13 


1.12 


Dorchester 


3,817 


956 


2,861 


.70 


.29 . 


1.35 


Frederick 


18,123 


11,045 


7,078 


1.48 


1.53 


1.39 


Garrett 


2,228 


1,263 


965 


.48 


.48 


.49 


Harford 


8,714 


2,118 


6,596 


.66 


.26 


1.33 


Howard 


5,076 


1,915 


3,161 


.93 


.59 


1.42 


Kent 


2,631 


1,454 


1,177 


.88 


.81 


.98 


Montgomery .... 


40,612 


19,010 


21,602 


.77 


.53 


1.31 


Prince George's . 


52,205 


31,729 


20,476 


1.05 


1.01 


1.12 


Queen Anne's. . . 


3,814 


2,098 


1,716 


1.17 


1.08 


1.30 


St. Mary's 


2,081 


1,455 


626 


.46 


.47 


.42 


Somerset 


2,067 


1,197 


870 


.52 


.50 


.55 


Talbot 


3,342 


1,562 


1,780 


.87 


.69 


1.14 




22,523 


12,199 


10,324 


1.33 


1.22 


1.49 




8,815 


4,601 


4,214 


1.06 


.90 


1.31 


Worcester 


5,756 


3,034 


2,722 


1.18 


1.01 


1.45 



Maryland State Department of Education 



179 



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180 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Deoartment of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 
Rehabilitation: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1956 



Source or Purpose 


Headquarters 


Vocational. 






Rehabilitation 


RECEIPTS 


Balance Forwarded from 1954-55 


S34,126 


$7,026 


General Fund AppropriaHon 


699,817 


302,643 


Special Fund Receipts 




Federal Fund AnnronriRtion 


42,559 


378,259 


Apnronriation Cancellations 


*(11.«05) 


*(26,486) 


Budget Credits 


8,868 


1,362 


Net Transfers 


4,746 






Total Funds Available 


$778,311 


$662,804 


DISBURSEMENTS 




Departmental and 






FiNANrTAL 


Administration 




Admi nt<?tr ation 






$162 885 


$43,343 


Technical and Special Fees 


4.198 


Communication 


4.907 


88.5 




8,038 


1,899 


Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 


2.110 


419 


Contractual Services 


11.310 


572 


Supplies and Materials . . . 


3,852 


889 


Equipment — Replacement 


1.911 


203 


Equipment — Additional 


1,117 


105 


Fixed Charges 


33,687 


1,900 


Total 


$234,015 


$50,215 




Stjpfrvt<^ory and 


Placement 




CONSin.TATIVE 


AND 




SER'''TCE<5 


Guidance 


Salaries 


$219,047 


$198,183 


Technical and Special Fees 


13.418 


6,966 


Communication 


4.500 


5,420 


Travel 


15,621 


15,875 


Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 


5.616 


Contractual Services 


7,073 


612 


Su- p ies and Materials 


2,102 


1,605 


Equipment — Replacement 


4.752 


700 


Equipment — Additional 


1,338 


483 


Fixed Charges 


13,951 






Total 


$273,467 


$243,795 




Administrative 


Case 




Services 


Services 


Salaries. 


$103,699 




Technical and Special Fees 


20.742 




Communication 


3,398 




Travel 


5 785 




Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 


417 




Contractual Services 


3,480 




Supplies and Materials 


2,827 




Equipment — Replacement 


1,301 




Equipment — Additional 


665 




Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 


$318,864 






Total 


$142,314 


$318,864 




Library 


Disabilities 




Extension 


Determinations 




Services 


(O.A.S.I.) 


Salaries 


$55,815 


$25,718 


Technical and Special Fees 


290 




Communication 


1,702 


583 


Travel 


682 


180 


Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 


243 






821 


4.54 


Suppli'^s and Materials 


2,104 


578 


Equipment— Replacement 


2.271 




P'quipment — Additional 


22.213 


2.184 


Fixed Charges 


1.275 


3,427 


Total 


$87,416 


$33,124 


Total Protrram Expenditures 


$737,212 


$645,998 




6,650 








Total Disbursements 


$743,862 


$645,998 


Unexpended Balance Returned to Treasury 


$12,128 


$7,973 




$22,321 


$8,833 



* Denotes red figure. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



181 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1956 



Source or Purpose 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


FR03TBURG 


Salisbury 


TOWSON 


RECEIPTS 


Balance Forwarded from 1954-55 
General Fund Appropriation .... 

Soecial Fund Receipts 

Appropriation Cancoiiations 

Budget Credits 

Net Transfers 


$3,779 
331,389 
86,624 
*(13,757) 
9,616 
5 


$925 
189,359 
9,777 
*(121) 
233 
1,986 


$2,402 
418,920 
71,913 
*(174) 
39,387 


$9,374 
348,111 
83,894 
*(8.349) 
16,379 


$27,730 
939,298 
191,663 
*(5,239) 
59,966 
5,239 


Total Funds Available. . . . 






$417,656 


$202,159 


$532,448 


$449,409 


$1,218,657 



DISBURSEMENTS 



General Administration 












Salaries and ^^ages 


$46,752 


$30,490 


$43,954 


$42,458 


$115,774 


Technical and Special Fees .... 


2,241 


1,895 


2,140 


381 


2,947 


Communication 


1,274 


1,012 


1,879 


2,067 


6,129 




324 


199 


469 


444 


1,331 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 














271 


523 


565 


305 


202 




1,276 


1,200 


2,155 


2,604 


4,533 




1,461 


853 


1,619 


1,061 


7,016 


Equipment — ^Replacement .... 


433 








470 


Equipment — A.dd' tional 


783 


889 


66 


204 


972 


Fixed Charges 


197 


760 


892 


1,025 


1 034 


Total 


$55,012 


$37,821 


$53,739 


$50,549 


$140,408 


Instruction 












Salaries and Wages 


$loO,oO 1 


!J)Oo,bU5 




!j>l /b,Do / 


$481,908 


Technical and Special Fees. . . . 


2,706 


3,041 


3,812 


5,165 


27,607 




138 


123 


1,117 


115 


1,348 


Travel 


459 


650 


1,658 


832 


3,113 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 














2,607 




825 


1,360 


2,611 


Contractual Services 


133 


635 


1,555 


304 


3,189 


Supplies and Materials 


3,206 


2,701 


5,477 


3,957 


8,577 


Equipment — Replacement 


2,061 


402 




1,418 


4 533 


Equipment — Additional 


4,373 


13.512 


9,561 


7,281 


21,342 












50 












Total 


$146,040 


$109,669 


$247,247 


$197,069 


$554,278 


Dietary Services 












Salaries and Wages 


$28,317 


$8,983 


$31,492 


$28,601 


$80,173 


Technical and Special Fees. . . . 


618 


737 


3,121 


1,091 


2,088 


Food 


48,412 


8,022 


41,541 


38,385 


96,413 


"M^otTir VfkHiplfi OriAm f'lrtt'^ sin/l 












Alain ten an ce 










114 


Contractual Services 


122 


628 




1,033 


2 105 


Supplies and IVIaterials 


1,213 


284 


1 252 


2^005 


7*712 


Equipment~~~I^eplacement .... 








7 997 


'391 


Equipment — Additional 


66 


491 


296 


419 


378 


Fixed Charges 










7 














Total. . 


$78,748 


$19,145 


$77,702 


$79,531 


$189,381 


Plant Operation and Maintenance 












Salaries and Wages 


$63,761 


$17,884 


$70,338 


$47,047 


$140,235 


Technical and Special Fees .... 


461 


642 


252 




4,216 


Fuel 


15,823 


2,854 


8,589 


10,760 


19,198 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 












Maintenance 


754 


119 




625 


624 


Contractual Services 


24,757 


5,650 


17,257 


23,520 


36,563 


Supplies and Materials 


5,656 


1,623 


7,182 


6,128 


21,739 


Equipment — Replacement .... 


673 






1,980 


11,959 


Equipment — Additional 


336 


788 


701 


456 


15,614 


Fixed Charges 












Total 


$112,221 


$29,560 


$104,319 


$90,516 


$250,148 


Total Program Expenditures .... 


$392,021 


$196,195 


$483,007 


$417,665 


$1,134,215 


Refunds 


330 




7,241 


1,460 


2,594 


Activities Association 


3,215 




8,672 


7,325 


29,293 


Athletic Association 


1,606 




5,773 


5,443 


9,347 


Application Fees 










9,321 


Other 




121 


14,697 




341 










Total Disbursements 


$397,172 


$196,316 


$519,390 


$431,893 


$1,185,111 


Unexpended Balance Re- 












turned to Treasury 


$16,038 


$1,362 


$6,160 


$7,956 


$11,059 


Balance, June 30, 1956 . . . 


$4,446 


$4,481 


$6,898 


$9,560 


$22,487 



* Denotes red figure. 

Note: Disbursements for summer school at Towson are included under appropriate items in Instruction 
and Dietary Services. 



182 Ninetieth Annual Report i 



Construction Accounts at Maryland State Teachers College 





1 

Source or Purpose 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


Balance, 
July 1, 
1955 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1956 


Balance, 
July 1, 
1955 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balani 
June i 
1956 


1 

2 
3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 

14 
15 
16 
17 
18 

19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 

30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 

43 
44 

45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 

54 
55 
66 

57 


General Construction Loan of 1949: 
Science building 

General Construction Loan of 1951: 
Furniture and equipment for dormitory. 

Library building 

Demonstration school 

Roads, water, and sewer 

Landscaping (sale of timber) 

Boiler plant, steam and electrical dis- 
tribution 

General Construction Loan of 1952: 
Grade and establish turf for athletic field 

Electrical distribution 

Plans and surveys for building program 
Roads, curbs and gutters, and parking 
area 

General Construction Loan of 1953: 

Additional funds for painting 

New equipment for dining hall 

Exterior of main building and Newell Hall 

Grading and parking for library 

Completion of sanitary sewer and water. 

Gymnasium — auditorium 

Equipment for gymnasium — auditorium. 

Gymnasium (no swimming pool) 

Equipment for gymnasium 

Equipment for repair and storage garage. 

General Construction Loan of 1954: 

Residence hall for 100 women 

Equipment for residence hall 

Residence hall for 75 men 

Equipment for residence hall 

Residence hall for 75 women 

Equipment for residence hall 

Library building . . . 

Roads, walks, and parking area 

Equipment for demonstration school .... 

Library building . . . . 

Equipment for library building 

Refrigeration room and facilities 

General Construction Loan of 1955' 
Construction of roads, drainage, and 

walks 

Supplement residence hal! for 100 women 

Equipment for two dormitories 

Gradinp, drainage, and .site improvement 
Supplement residence hall for 75 men . . . 
Supplement residence hall for 75 women 
Equipment for library building 
Acqui.sition of land adjacent to highway. 
Supplement library building 
Equipment for demonstration school 
library . 

Purchase of additional land 

Acquisition of land and improvements . 
Plans and specifications for women's 
dormitory 


$14 

2,923 

'786 
6,000 

357 ',686 
22,000 
5 

259,512 
30,000 


$40,000 
30,000 


t$14 

'786 

173,535 
569 
t5 

178,992 
840 


$2 ',923 
6,000 

184',15i 
21,431 

80 ,520 
30,000 

39,160 
30,000 










Total 


$678,926 


$70,000 


$354 ,741 


$394,185 











t Reverted. 



Maryland State Department of Education 183 



^ seal Year Ending June 30, 1956 





Frostbtjrq 


Salisbttrt 


TOWSON 




Balance, 
July 1, 
1955* 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1956 


Balance, 
July 1, 
1955* 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1956 


Balance, 
July 1, 
1955* 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1956 


- 


$158 






$158 


$2 ',247 




$2 ',247 














3l',82i 




$14,894 


16,927 


47',i93 

1 78'> 
1 ,< oO 




46 ',742 
1 785 


$45i 


$202 
4,500 

30,293 




$1,815 


$262 
4,500 

28,478 




10 ',528 




10,528 




2 ',317 
1,910 




l"898 
1,910 


'4i9 










] 

2 
2 
2 
2 


16,064 
7,102 
9,432 
157 




7,636 

9 ',432 
157 


8 ',428 
7,102 










187 
1,337 
6,601 




187 
1,337 
1,815 


4 ',786 


3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 

4 


213 ',368 
10,000 

213,497 
10,000 




2 10 ',480 
55 ',906 


2 ',888 
10,000 
156,591 
,. 10,000 


213,750 
10,000 
8,898 




16,568 
6,272 
8,291 


197',i82 
3,728 
607 


425 ",959 
120,000 
3,107 




24,571 
1,337 


401 ',388 
120,000 
1,770 


4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
5 
5 
5: 




S27',666 
54 ,000 
47 ,500 
47 ,500 


l',537 
34,810 
3,908 
3,908 


25,463 
19,190 
43 ,592 
43 ,592 




$35 ',666 
15 ,000 
70,000 




35,606 
15,000 
70,000 










5. 
6 

5i 












4,500 
20,669 


4,500 
17,948 


2',72i 


t(44',i25) 


$45 ',666 


'335 


'546 


51 




















25 ,000 


24,240 


760 


5; 


1522 ,127 


$176,000 


$354,196 


$343 ,931 


1288,100 


$145,169 


$108,161 


$325 ,108 


$548 ,061 


$70,000 


$55 ,637 


$562 ,424 



Jorrected opening balance. 
Deficit. 



I 



184 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE I— Number of Public Schools: State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1956 









Elementary 






High 




Com- 






















bined 






















Ele- 


County 






One-Teachert 










Senior 


mentary- 


Grand 


Total 






Other 


Total 




Junior- 


and Vo- 


High 




Total 


Ele- 






Ele- 


High 


Junior 


Senior 


cational 






mGntary 


la 


lb 


niGntary 










Total State 


939 


716 


11 


24 


681 


153 


46 


77 


30 


70 


Allegany 


34 


24 






24 


5 




5 




5 


Anne Arundel . . . 


DO 


OD 






OD 


Q 


■3 


4 




£. 




Baltimore City . . 


163 


*125 






125 


30 


13 


3 


14 


'8 




82 


64 






64 


16 


5 


7 


4 


2 


Calvert 


16 


13 




i 


12 


3 


1 


2 






Caroline 


13 


7 


1 




6 










6 


Carroll 


21 


11 


2 




9 


'2 




'2 




8 


Cecil 


24 


15 






15 


3 




3 




6 




19 


12 






12 


3 




3 




4 


Dorchester 


31 


26 




10 


16 


5 


i 


3 


i 




Frederick 


39 


30 




3 


27 


3 




3 




6 


Garrett 


21 


18 




2 


16 


2 




2 




1 


Harford 


23 


16 






16 


5 


"i 


4 




2 


Howard 


17 


11 


"i 




10 


4 


2 


1 


i 


2 


Kent 


16 


12 


1 


2 


9 


2 




2 




2 


Montgomery. . . . 


90 


72 






72 


17 


9 


5 


3 


1 


Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


104 


83 






83 


19 


8 


8 


3 


2 


15 


11 






11 


4 




4 








20 


15 


*i 


i 


13 


2 




2 




■3 




22 


15 




2 


13 


3 




3 




4 


Talbot 


20 


17 


4 


3 


10 


3 




3 






Washington 


45 


34 






34 


8 


'2 


5 


"i 


3 


Wicomico 


22 


16 


i 




15 


3 


1 


1 


1 


3 


Worcester 


17 


13 






13 


2 




2 




2 



* Includes six elementary schools with occupational centers and two separate occupational centers, 
t [ la — Schools having one teacher and grades 1 to 4 or lower. 
\ lb — Schools having one teacher and grades 1 to 5 or higher. 



Maryi^nd State Department of Education 



185 



TABLE II— Total Number of Different Pupils : Maryland Public Schools : 
Year Ending June 30, 1956 



County 


All Pupils 


Elementary 


High 


Grand 
Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total State* 


498,839 


255,557 


243,282 


318,457 


164,785 


153,672 


180,382 


90,772 


89,610 


Allegany 


16,102 


8,235 


7,867 


8,669 


4,385 


4,284 


7,433 


3,850 


3,583 


Anne Arundel . . 


31,184 


15,902 


15,282 


19,705 


10,262 


9,443 


11,479 


5,640 


5.839 


Baltimore City. . 


154,404 


79,226 


75,178 


103,947 


53,902 


50,045 


50,457 


25,324 


25,133 


Baltimore 


66,742 


34,320 


32,422 


41,252 


21,355 


19,897 


25,490 


12,965 


12,525 


Calvert 


3,582 


1,862 


1,720 


2,278 


1,200 


1,078 


1,304 


662 


642 


Caroline 


4,160 


2,135 


2.025 


2,495 


1,304 


1,191 


1,665 


831 


834 


Carroll 


9,765 


4,972 


4,793 


5,614 


2,882 


2,732 


4,151 


2,090 


2,061 


Cecil 


8,943 


4,481 


4,462 


5,701 


2.913 


2,788 


3,242 


1,568 


1,674 


Charles 


6,576 


3,357 


3,219 


4,048 


2,115 


1,933 


2,528 


1,242 


1,286 


Dorchester 


5,584 


2,800 


2,784 


3,382 


1,705 


1,677 


2,202 


1,095 


1,107 


Frederick 


12,786 


6,511 


6,275 


7,496 


3,875 


3,621 


5,290 


2,636 


2,654 


Garrett 


4,805 


2.476 


2,329 


2,765 


1,430 


1,335 


2,040 


1,046 


994 


Harford 


14,156 


7,247 


6,909 


8,906 


4,570 


4,336 


5,250 


2,677 


2,573 


Howard 


5,933 


3.040 


2,893 


3,574 


1,877 


1,697 


2,359 


1,163 


1,196 


Kent 


3,162 


1,597 


1,565 


1,889 


926 


963 


1,273 


671 


602 


Montgomery . . . 


55,509 


28,409 


27,100 


38,105 


19,599 


18.506 


17,404 


8,810 


8,594 


Prince George's . 


53,276 


27,373 


25,903 


33,849 


17,651 


16,198 


19,427 


9,722 


9,705 


Queen Anne's. . . 


3,439 


1,753 


1,686 


2,045 


1,051 


994 


1,394 


702 


692 


St. Mary's 


5,157 


2,663 


2,494 


3,524 


1,857 


1.667 


1,633 


806 


827 


Somerset 


4,154 


2,098 


2,056 


2,492 


1,269 


1,223 


1,662 


829 


833 


Talbot 


4,007 


2,055 


1,952 


2,366 


1,267 


1,099 


1,641 


788 


853 


Washington .... 


17,547 


9,098 


8,449 


10,341 


5,424 


4,917 


7,206 


3,674 


3,532 




8,751 


4,4L3 


4,293 


5,362 


2,740 


2,622 


3,389 


1,718 


1,671 


Worcester 


5,127 


2,627 


2,500 


3,151 


1,590 


1,561 


1,976 


1,037 


939 



* Total State figures exclude duplicates among the counties and Baltimore City. 

t Excludes the following pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges: Alleganv, 85B-86G; Anne 
Arundel, 9B-5G; Baltimore, 115B-124G; Prince George's, 50B-44G; Wicom.ico, 104B-100G. 

t Includes the following pupils in prekindergarten in Baltimore City: 95B-8oG. Also includes the following 
Dupils in kindergarten: Baltimore City, 6,994B-6,825G; Baltimore, 19B-21G; Montgomery, 3,108B-2,953G; Wash- 
ngton, 241B-213G. 

° Excludes the following in home and hospital classes in Baltimore City: home instruction, 96B-75G; hospital 
;lasses, 68B-71G. 



186 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



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Ninetieth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



191 



TABLE V 



Number of Pupils, Schools, Teachers : Nonpublic Schools : 

Fall of 1955 



State of Maryland : 



County 


Number of Pupils 


NtJMBER OP Schools 


Total 
Number 
of 

Different 
Teachers 


Total 


Nursery 


Kinder- 
garten 


Other 
Ele- 
mentary 


Second- 
ary 


Total 


Ele- 
mentary 


Second- 
ary 


Com- 
bined 
Elem- 
Sec. 


catholic schools (PARISH AND PRIVATE)* 


'otal State .... 


82,960 




20 


1,975 


69,761 


11,204 


172 


131 


15 


26 


2,071 


Allegany 


2,749 








2,192 


557 


8 


3 


1 


4 


77 


Anne Arundel . . . 


2,387 






'71 


2,071 


245 


4 


3 




1 


4fi 


Baltimore City. . 


37,985 




'26 


974 


30,378 


6,613 


70 


t61 


' "5 


4 


986 




13,149 






39 


11,526 


1,584 


22 


16 


3 


3 


297 


Calvert 


125 








115 


10 


1 






1 


5 


Caroline 


31 








31 




1 


1 






6 


Carroll 


375 








315 


60 


2 


1 




"i 


11 


CecU 


359 






24 


335 







t2 






8 


Charles 


1,186 








1,008 


178 


2 




' '2 


26 


Frederick 


1,237 








982 


255 


6 


■ 3 


■ 1 


2 


54 


Garrett 


102 






12 


90 




1 


1 






3 


Harford 


592 






62 


530 




3 


3 






13 


1 Howard 


912 






17 


781 


ii4 


5 


4 




■ i 


28 


Montgomery. . . . 


9,017 






713 


7,642 


662 


16 


112 


" *i 


3 


224 


Prince George's. . 


8,287 








7,899 


388 


17 


13 


4 




170 


St. Mary's 


3,332 








2,904 


428 


10 


7 




3 


86 


Washington 


848 






63 


675 


110 


1 






1 


24 




287 








287 




1 


' "i 






7 . 



OTHER NONPUBLIC SCHOOLSf 



3tal State 


18,838 


2,737 


3,621 


8,465 


4,015 


216 


°181 


7 


28 


1,611 




116 


11 


105 






4 


°4 






5 


Anne Arundel . . . 


834 


113 


189 


34i 


i9i 


16 


°14 


"i 


* "i 


68 


Baltimore City . . 


6,432 


1,039 


734 


3,046 


1,613 


52 


°41 




11 


627 


Baltimore 


4,167 


353 


1,130 


1,546 


1,138 


43 


°35 


' '2 


6 


372 


Carroll 


37 




23 


14 




2 


°2 






2 


Cecil 


269 






190 


79 


3 


1 


1 


1 


21 


Dorchester 


15 




'i5 






1 


°1 






1 


Frederick 


267 


'43 


89 


91 


"44 


6 


°5 




" i 


35 


Harford 


132 


28 


104 






4 


°4 






8 


Howard 


67 




5 


62 




3 


3 






11 


Kent 


42 




33 


9 




2 


°2 






3 


Montgomery. . 


4,047 


92 i 


350 


2,228 


548 


41 


°37 


' i 


■ 3 


310 


Prince George's. . 


1,460 


160 


772 


505 


23 


26 


°24 




2 


60 


Queen Anne's . . . 
St. Mary's 


72 






62 


10 


2 


1 




1 


8 


190 






10 


180 


3 


1 


' '2 




28 


Talbot 


164 


27 


34 


103 




1 


1 






14 


Washington . . . . 


485 


30 


18 


248 


i89 


4 


°2 




2 


35 


Wicomico 


42 


12 


20 


10 




3 


°3 






3 



Figures furnished by Directors of Catholic Education. 
Figures furnished by principals of schools. 

Includes one school that is a nursery and /or kindergarten only. 
Includes schools that are nursery and/or kindergarten only, as follows: 

Allegany, 4; Anne Arundel, 9; Baltimore City, 24; Baltimore. 26; Carroll, 1; Dorchester, 1; Frederick, 4; 

Harford, 4; Kent, 1; Montgomery, 19; Prince George's, 21; Washington, 1; Wicomico, 2; 'Total Stare, II7'. 



192 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE VI — Number of Positions in Public Schools and County Offices : 
State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1956 



\^\J U IN 1 1 


Principals and Teachers 


Clerks 
Schools 


All Schools 


Elementary 


High 


Total 


Men 


Women 


Total 


Men 


Women 


Total 


Men 


Women 




17,852.6 


4,818 


1 


13,034.5 


9,996 


3 


1,098 


1 


8,898 


2 


7,856 


3 


3,720 





4,136 


3 


681 6 


Alleganyt 


627 


2 


189 





438 


2 


305 


7 


27 





278 


7 


321 


5 


162 





159 


5 


13.0 


Anne Arundelf. . 


1,096 


3 


240 


5 


855 


8 


639 


3 


58 


3 


581 





457 





182 


2 


274 


8 


86.0 


Baltimore City* . 


5,070 


5 


1,257 


3 


3,813 


2 


2,921 


5 


306 


5 


2,615 





2,149 





950 


8 


1,198 


2 


158.0 




2,362 


4 


808 


3 


1,554 


1 


1,345 


6 


261 


2 


1,084 


4 


1,016 


8 


547 


1 


469 


7 


126.0 


Calvert 


134 





34 


9 


99 


1 


73 


7 


6 


1 


67 


6 


60 


3 


28 


8 


31 


5 


2.5 


Caroline 


166 





50 





116 





80 





6 





74 





86 





44 





42 





2.5 


Carroll 


370 





111 





259 





176 


5 


19 





157 


5 


193 


5 


92 





101 


5 


11.3 


Cecil 


329 


5 


85 


4 


244 


1 


176 


8 


6 


5 


170 


3 


152 


7 


78 


9 


73 


8 


9.7 




249 





62 





187 





134 





10 





124 





115 





52 





63 





6.0 


Dorchester 


211 





59 





152 





105 


9 


6 


3 


99 


6 


105 


1 


52 


7 


52 


4 


1.0 


Frederick 


442 


6 


115 


9 


326 


7 


215 


3 


19 





196 


3 


227 


3 


96 


9 


130 


4 


14.5 


Garrett 


183 


9 


73 





110 


9 


98 


9 


23 





75 


9 


85 





50 





35 





2.0 




498 





131 





367 





265 





34 





231 





233 





97 





136 





13.0 




232 





73 


2 


158 


8 


116 


3 


18 





98 


3 


115 


7 


55 


2 


60 


5 


10.0 


Kent 


125 


9 


32 


4 


93 


5 


60 


5 


4 


3 


56 


2 


65 


4 


28 


1 


37 


3 


5.0 


Montgomery*. . . 


2,080 


6 


513 





1,567 


6 


1,263 


7 


113 


1 


1,150 


6 


816 


9 


399 


9 


417 





94.0 


Prince George'st . 


1,880 


9 


467 


1 


1,413 


8 


1,075 


3 


89 


4 


985 


9 


805 


6 


377 


7 


427 


9 


61.0 


Queen Anne's . . . 


140 


5 


50 





90 


5 


68 


5 


11 





57 


5 


72 





39 





33 





4.0 


St. Mary's 


168 


8 


29 


6 


139 


2 


99 


2 


4 


5 


94 


7 


69 


6 


25 


1 


44 


5 


10.6 


Somerset 


167 





38 


6 


128 


4 


86 





7 


6 


78 


4 


81 





31 





50 







Talbot 


157 


5 


49 





108 


5 


80 


5 


9 





71 


5 


77 





40 





37 





2.0 


Washington*. . . . 


648 


1 


203 


2 


444 


9 


334 


2 


31 


9 


302 


3 


313 


9 


171 


3 


142 


6 


26.0 




311 


6 


87 


3 


224 


3 


171 





18 


4 


152 


6 


140 


6 


68 


9 


71 


7 


16.5 


Worcester 


199 


3 


57 




141 


9 


102 


9 


8 





94 


9 


96 


4 


49 


4 


47 





7.0 



* Includes following teachers of kindergarten and nursery: 



Total 


353.0 




353 





353 







353 





Baltimore City. . . . 


254.0 




254 





254 







254 





Baltimore 


1.0 









1 







1 







89.5 




.89 


5 


8? 


5 




89 


5 


Washington 


8.5 




8 


5 


8 


5 




8 


5 



t Excludes following teachers and principals in elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges: Bowie, 4, Frost- 
burg, 7; Salisbury, 7; Towson, 10; total, 28. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



193 



TABLE VI — Continued — Number of Positions in Public Schools and County Offices: 
State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1956 





Administrati\ E, Supervisory and Clerical Positions in 




















County 


Offices 






































Repair 


Janitors, 




Supts. 


Supervisors 




Super- 


Other 






or 




Cleaners, 


County 


and 












visors 


of 


Adminis- 


Office 


Utility 


Firemen, 




Assoc. or 










Pupil Per- 


trative or 


and 




Men 


Etc. 




Asst. 


Ele- 






sons p1 and 


Super- 


Clerical 










Supts. 


mentary 


High 


Visiting 


visory 


Staff 






















Teachers 


Positions 












Total State 


41 





120. 


1 


161 


1 


122. 


9 


228.6 


402. 


3 


603. 


5 


2,965.3 


Allegany 


1 





5 


5 


5 


5 


3. 





2.0 


9 





6. 





99 . 


Anne Arundel .... 


3 





8 


5 


6 


5 


6 





9.0 


18 





30.0 


168.0 


Paltimore City . . . 


8 





19 


9 


74 


3 


51. 





al52.1 


138 





d251 





el,088.0 


Baltimore 


3 


5 


13 


7 


18 


4 


14. 





621.5 


77 





33 





317.0 


Calvert 


1 





2 





1 





1 





1.0 


3 





6 


1 


17.0 


Carolinp 


1 





1 


4 


1 





1 







2 


5 


3 


2 


14.0 


Carroll 


1 





2 


9 


2 


8 


2 





ci'.O 


4 


6 


2 





21.2 


Cecil 


1 





2 


5 


2 


5 


2 





1.0 


4 





15 


7 


43.0 


Charles 


1 





2 





2 





2. 





1.0 


6 









28.0 




1 





2 





1 





1 







3 





2 


5 


/30.0 




1 





3 


2 


3 


S 


2 





2.0 


4 





2 





66.0 


Garrett 


1 





I 


2 


1 





1 





1.0 


5 





2 





ff42.0 


Harford 


1 


5 


3 





3 


5 


2 


5 


5.0 


6 





8 





40.0 


Howard 


1 





2 





2 





2 







3 





2 





22.0 


Kent 


1 





1 


5 


1 





1 







2 


8 


3 





19.0 


' Montgomery 


3 




17 


3 


12 


3 


10 


9 


13.0 


51 





92 





338.0 


Prince George's. . . 


3 





15 





10 


5 


9 





8.0 


28 





120 





370.0 


; Queen Anne's .... 


1 





1 


5 


1 





1 







3 





3 





18.0 


St. Mary's 


1 





2 









1 







3 


6 






14.0 


Somerset 


1 





1 


5 


i 


5 


1 







2 





"2 


6 


18.0 


1 Talbot 


1 





1 


5 


1 





1 





1.0 


2 





1 





20.0 


! Washington 


2 





5 





6 





4 


5 


6.0 


18 


8 


17.0 


82.5 




1 





3 





1 





2 





1.0 


5 









35. 1 


1 Worcester 


1 





2 





2 





1 





1.0 


3 





'2 





25.5 



a. Includes 33 full-time nurses and 25 part-time physicians; b, includes one full-time nurse; e, includes one part- 
ime nurse; d, includes 109 per diem laborers; e, includes 433 on part-time basis; /, includes 9 on part-time basis; 
md g includes 10 on part-time basis. 



194 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE VII — Average Number of Pupils Belonging and Attending : Per Cent of Attendance : 
Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1956 



County 


Average Number Belonging 


Average Number Attending 


Per Cent of Attendance 






















Total 


Ele- 


High 


Total 


Ele- 


High 


Total 


Ele- 


High 






mentary 






mentary 






mentary 


Total State 


477,597.5 


304,377.2 


173,220.3 


437,944.1 


278,575.6 


159,368.5 


91.7 


91.5 


92.0 


Allegany 


15,534.3 


*8,367.1 


7,167.2 


14,753.3 


*7,914.3 


6,839.0 


95.0 


*94.6 


95.4 


Anne Arundel . . 


29,073.6 


*18,357.0 


10,716.6 


26,774.2 


*16,963.9 


9,810.3 


92.1 


*92.4 


91.5 


Baltimore City . . 


146,982.3 


t98,223.2 


48,759.1 


130,449.2 


t86,934.0 


43,515.2 


88.8 


t88.5 


89.2 


Baltimore 


62,917.9 


*t3«,820.4 


24,097.5 


58 170.5 


*t35,921.3 


22,249.2 


92.5 


*t92.5 


92.3 


Calvert 


3,431.4 


2,183.6 


1,247.8 


3,134.8 


1,992.9 


1,141.9 


91.3 


91.3 


91.5 


Caroline 


3,924.3 


2,353.6 


1,570.7 


3,738.7 


2,246.3 


1,492.4 


95.3 


95.4 


95.0 


Carroll 


9,309.6 


5,358.4 


3,951.2 


8,733.2 


5,005.9 


3,727.3 


93.8 


93.4 


94.3 


Cecil 


8,266.7 


5,244.7 


3,022.0 


7,639.8 


4,8.53.2 


2,786.6 


92.4 


92.5 


92.2 


Charles 


6,174.4 


3,784.2 


2,390.2 


5,592.8 


3,439.1 


2,153.7 


90.6 


90.9 


90.1 


Dorchester 


■5,424.8 


3,298.2 


2,126.6 


5,121.3 


3,120.1 


2,001.2 


94.4 


94.6 


94.1 


Frederick 


12,266.4 


7,193.2 


5,073.2 


11,382.9 


6,654.5 


4,728.4 


92.8 


92.5 


93.2 


Garrett 


4,613.6 


2,652.9 


1.960.7 


4,321.6 


2,472.5 


1,849.1 


93.7 


93.2 


94.3 


Harford 


13,160.1 


8,193.8 


4;966.3 


12,352.1 


7,658.8 


4,693.3 


93.9 


93.5 


94.5 


Howard 


5,483.9 


3,265.3 


2,218.6 


5,135.3 


3,038.6 


2,096.7 


93.6 


93.1 


94.5 


Kent 


2,998.4 


1,797.7 


1,200.7 


2,819.2 


1,701.0 


1,118.2 


94.0 


94.6 


93.1 


Montgomery . . . 


52,550.2 


t35,999.3 


16,550.9 


48,821.2 


t33,270.4 


15,550.8 


92.9 


t92.4 


93.9 


Prince George's . 


49,742.8 


*31, 508.4 


18,234.4 


46,262.8 


*29,426.9 


16,835.9 


93.0 


*93.4 


92.3 


Queen Anne's. . . 


3,256.0 


1,939.3 


1,316.7 


3,032.7 


1,819.3 


1,213.4 


93.1 


93.8 


92.1 


St. Mary's 


4,563.4 


3,068.3 


1,495.1 


4,202.0 


2,837.9 


1,364.1 


92.1 


92.5 


91.2 


Somerset 


3,983.8 


2,393.2 


1,590.6 


3,747.5 


2,254.7 


1,492.8 


94.1 


94.3 


93.9 


Talbot 


3,822.4 


2,257.2 


1,565.2 


3,558.7 


2,103.4 


1,455.3 


93.1 


93.2 


93.0 


Washington .... 


16,935.8 


tl0,024.9 


6,910.9 


15,923.8 


t9,389.8 


6,534.0 


94.0 


193.7 


94.5 


Wicomico 


8,313.2 


*5,106.7 


3,206.5 


7,776.2 


*4.786.4 


2,989.8 


93.5 


*93.7 


93.2 


Worcester 


4,868.2 


2,986.6 


1,881.6 


4,.500.3 


2,770.4 


1,729.9 


92.4 


92.8 


91.9 



Average Number Belonging: 

* Excludes following number belong in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges: Allegany, 164.0; Anne 

Arundel, 14.0; Baltimore, 235.2; Prince George's, 91.7; Wicomico, 203.4; total, 708.3. 
t Includes the following number belonging in kindergarten: Baltimore City: 12,339.3 kindergarten and 145.5 
prekindergarten; Baltimore, 32.3; Montgomery 5,678.0; Washington, 416.5. 
Average Number Attending: 

* Excludes following number attending in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges: Allegany, 154.9; Anne 

Arundel 13.2; Baltimore, 219.3; Prince George's, 84.1; Wicomico, 189.2; total, 660.7. 
t Includes the fo'lowing number attending kindergarten: Baltimore City: 10,300.7 kindergarten and 125.6 
prekindergarten; Baltimore, 30.1; Montgomery-, 4,955.3; Washington, 353.8. 
Per Cent of Attendance: 

* Excludes foilov/ing per cent of attendance in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges: Allegany, 94.5; 

Anne Arundel, 94.3; Baltimore, 93.2; Prince George's, 91.7; Wicomico, 93.0. 
t Includes following per cent of attendance in kindergarten: Baltimore City: 83.5 kindergarten and 86.3 pre- 
kindergarten; Baltimore, 93.2; Montgomery, 88.0; Washington, 84.9. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



195 



TABLE VIII — State Aid for Minimum Program*: Maryland Public Schools — 
Grades 1 to 12: Year Ending June 30, 1956 



County 


Cost op Minimum Program 


State Aid for 
Minimum Program 


Total 


Minimum 
Salaries 


Other 
Current 
Expense 

Costs 


Trans- 
portation 


Amount 


Per Cent 




$85,058,492 


$63,287,360 


$15,821,840 


$ 5,949,292 


$38,275,407 


45 







3,387,004 


2,472,615 


618,154 


296,235 


2,241,363 


66 


2 




5,346,156 


3,923,594 


980,899 


441,663 


3,509,818 


65 


7 




22,738,875 


18,191,100 


4,547,775 




5,538,120 


24 


3 




10,714,580 


7,915,139 


1,978,784 


820,657 


2,828,217 


26 


4 




732,927 


472,390 


118,098 


142,439 


596,397 


81 


4 




939,595 


643,985 


160,996 


134,614 


715,050 


76 


1 




1,900,628 


1,361,886 


340.472 


198,270 


1,164,802 


61 


3 




1,685,093 


1,205,932 


301,483 


177,678 


1,052,309 


62 


4 




1,33^,196 


909,295 


227,323 


196,578 


1,076,958 


80 


8 




1,208,718 


823,060 


205,765 


179,893 


723,167 


59 


8 




2,347,780 


1,670,054 


417,514 


260,212 


1,318,741 


56 


2 




1,176,957 


719,884 


179,971 


277,102 


955,528 


81 


2 




2,583,164 


1,762,695 


440,673 


379,796 


1,535,615 


59 


4 




1,193,548 


822,187 


205,547 


165,814 


819,744 


68 


7 


Kent 


688,227 


464,767 


116,192 


107,268 


474,664 


69 







8,684,099 


6.575,339 


1,643,835 


464,925 


2,827,293 


32 


5 


Prince George's . 


8,709,173 


6,573,425 


1,643,356 


492,392 


4,864,408 


55 


9 


799,755 


527,275 


131,819 


140,661 


521,491 


65 


2 




913,836 


591,602 


147,900 


174,334 


659,988 


72 


2 




901,392 


619,935 


154,984 


126,473 


728,681 


80 


8 


: Talbot 


860,371 


603,817 


150,955 


105,599 


517,120 


60 


1 




3,417,504 


2,524,780 


631,195 


261,529 


1,947,345 


57 







1,678,971 


1,169,194 


292,298 


217,479 


1,004,586 


59 


8 




1,116,943 


743,410 


185,852 


187,681 


654,002 


58 


5 



The minimum program in calculating State Equalization aid includes the following: 

(a) total minimum salaries of the allowed number of teachers and principals as determined by State law; 

(b) other current expense including the cost of operation and maintenance and the cost of instruction other 
than the salaries of teachers, principals, and supervisors, and (c) the cost of approved transportation to public 
schools. 



196 Ninetieth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



197 



TABLE IX-B 



-Receipts from the Federal Government for Public School Purposes in 
Maryland:* Year Ending June 30, 1956 



Vocational 
1 Evening 
j Schools 


National i 
School j 
Lunch and 

Milk 1 
Programs | 


$73,275 


1 

$1,435,599 I 


4,090 
1,006 
24,760 
12,748 
348 


82,522 
95.080 
275,975 
198,910 
6,250 


288 
590 
735 
875 
587 


9.173 
33,861 
24,408 
13,108 
14,088 


82 
1,056 
2,058 
j 66 


40.356 
20,306 
63,437 
32,342 
8,251 


7,788 
7,770 
110 


162,335 
220,239 
12,425 
7,081 1 
6,835 


705 
6.150 
1,133 

330 


10,393 1 
67,643 ! 
21,538 1 
9,043 i 



County 



Total 
Federal 
Funds 



Schools 



On-the- 
Farm and 
Veterans' 
Training 



Total State $11,674,854 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 
Baltimore City. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 



Caroline. . . 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles. . . 
Dorchester . 



Frederick 
Garrett. . 
Harford. . 
Howard. . 
Kent 



Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's .... 
Somerset 



Talbot 

Washington . 
Wicomico. . 
Worcester. . 



119,642 
762,638 
t624,148 
593,647 
36,273 

18,698 
40,905 
514,285 
433,667 
24,958 

125,377 
33,869 
1,114,317 
62,167 
12,498 

3,180,799 
3,239,204 
18,548 
3,77,547 
8,052 

16,762 
261,829 
32,224 
22,800 



$308,460 

12,338 
6,998 
81,873 
22,736 
4,114 

6,992 
5,179 
1,868 
6,891 
7,894 

14,397 
10,246 

9,385 
6,462 
2,804 

25,570 
26,381 
6.013 
4,168 
1,217 

4.385 
29,886 
6,738 
3,925 



$293,535 

120,692 
1,749 
J235,519 



4,915 

2,245 
1,275 
1,741 
3,082 
2,389 

2,701 
2,261 
1,611 
1,027 
1,443 



1,135 
3,524 



1,279 
1,959 
2,815 
173 



Current 
Expense 
Assistance 



$3,301,431 



301,161 



154,459 
20.646 



112,277 
168,225 



67.841 



394,176 
22,270 



946,948 
821.554 



126,354 



156,191 
9,329 



School 
Construc- 
tion 
Assistance 



$6,256,533 

356,644 
20'4,794 



373,256 
241,486 



643,650 



2,038,158 
2,162,125 



236,420 



* Includes payments applicable to the preceding year received after June 30, 1955, and excludes those for the 
urrent year received after June 30, 1956. 
t Total includes $6,021 for salaries for Vocational Rehabilitation. 
t Includes veterans' training programs. 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



199 



Fixed 
Charges 
(Including 

Rent) 


*$9,193,915 

54,387 
99 ,921 
t3 ,021 ,843 
131 ,646 
9.350 

9,762 
30,773 
22,848 
21 ,301 
27,186 

30 ,875 
10,192 
30,182 
26 ,055 
7,895 

85,150 
155.626 
15,810 
5,969 
19,060 


iiSi 


ill 


a. mm. mm sis.ii is.iii 

i Isiii SisHi ss5s§ §ssSS 


123 ,705 
475,959 
272,435 
209 ,875 


Ji 


1 siiii iiiss iissj. nisi 

1 gS||i? ERSsS gSSSSS SSSSS 

d 


23,738 
167,214 
67,428 
38,883 


1 


1 iisis im.m m.s.m mm. 

1 iSiSS SSgSS SSSSS 5|KSS 


81 ,678 
322 ,059 
142,479 
103 ,048 




insirucuonai 
Service 


S illiS iJ.lil ISSiS ilESi 

i iisis ggpi iiiii Iiiii 

1 CO^OOC. . « C^, OOO 


695,252 
3,311 ,987 
1 ,434 ,652 

879,702 


Adminis- 
tration 


i ^.sqjs.s. ^m^n iiiis sgiss. 

1 ^^t;;?^^^ 


37,353 
137,474 
41,163 
33 ,739 


Total 
Current 
Disburse- 
ments 


s ^.^^§22.;;. si.sis ^^^.sii ISsiS 
R Iiiii liiji gipi ^JJii 


973,812 
4 ,465 ,473 
1,985,388 
1,281,897 


1* 


i : : ill ;| lig 




Capital 
Outlay 


$49,737,925 

1,093,079 
2,799 ,371 
10,430,536 
11,128,081 
51 .727 

2,637 
713,557 
1 ,076 .496 
656,801 
76 ,764 

912,228 
120,441 
1,178,299 
88.131 
35,033 

7,770.939 
6,525.860 
346.958 
547,913 
89,738 


466,891 
2,878,861 
395 ,229 
352,355 


Debt 
Service 


1 iisii mxm iiiii mm 

i iiiij SsSSa SSISS sjsss 


146,315 
211,059 
528,327 
102 ,400 


lii 


*$193,899,703 

5 .701 ,855 
10,271,270 
t52 ,879,748 
30,721 ,249 
1,031,117 

1,079,637 
3,118,613 
3,296,199 
2 ,384 ,233 
1 ,676 ,997 

3,874 ,727 
1,498,701 
4 ,825 ,297 
1 ,699 ,390 
949,797 

24 ,544 ,460 
21,056,400 
1,359,279 
1,709,017 
1,155,993 


1 ,588 ,478 
7 ,555 ,433 
2,913,814 
1 ,736 ,672 


Balance, June 30, 1956 


Building 
Funds 1 


1 li mflMA iplA 
^ g| 'i^ i^-^s i^i^^s 




II 


1 ii^ii mm? mm iiiii 

i ii ----- ii-^- 


r(7,559) 
183,163 
223,981 
993 


II 


♦$223,729,271 

7,638,651 
14,481,674 
t52,879,748 
39 043 184 
1 ,078 ,006 

1,189,720 
3 ,8Co ,359 
4,153 ,068 
2 ,583 ,432 
1 ,685,497 

5,864 ,972 
1 ,028 ,384 
4,840,731 
1,766,736 
984,113 

27,621,936 
27,250,390 
1,469,181 
2,147,680 
1,294,480 


2,149,683 
7,854,802 
3,244,204 
1,742,313 


County 


j ill jjjl iiiii li 1 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



205 



TABLE XVII— Disbursements for Debt Service: Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1956 









School 


Construction Debt Service 


















Pay- 




















Total 












ments to 


County 


Debt 


Long-term County 


State 


Loan 


Short-term Loan 


Sinking 




Service 


Bonds 








Fund 






Redemp- 


Interest 


Redemp- 


Interest 


Redemp- 


Interest 








tion 




tion 




tion 






Total State 


$15,893,439 


$6,991,734 


$4,336,428 


$3,611,047 


$930,330 


$18,500 




$5,400 


Allegany 


464,808 


266,000 


57,953 


78,530 


62,325 








Anne Amndel 


821,586 


307,000 


193,033 


237,868 


83,685 








Baltimore City 


2,946,121 


1,679,000 


1,261,721 










5,400 


Baltimore 


3,681,660 


1,300,000 


1,051,220 


1,096,517 


233,923 






Calvert 


139,058 


*61,000 


*26,7o6 


43,197 


8,103 








Caroline 


56,524 


5,000 


1,225 


42,854 


7,445 








Carroll 


144,5^3 


100,000 


14,000 


16,533 


14,000 








Cecil 


188,017 


105,000 


48,643 


26,682 


7,692 








Charles 


144,838 


40,000 


16,502 


75,022 


13,314 








Dorchester 


231,450 


70,440 


63,310 


61,697 


17,503 


tl8',506 






Frederick 


180,308 


43,000 


5,266 


96,943 


35,099 








Garrett 


140,988 


75,000 


20,389 


37,995 


7,604 








Harford 


397,984 


222,500 


94,112 


61,356 


20.016 










178,923 


55,016 


32,059 


72,035 


19,813 








Kent 


114,018 


50,000 


12,596 


42,494 


8,928 








Montgomery 


2,597,394 


1,063,278 


784,151 


616,122 


133,843 








Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 


2,225,826 


1,102,000 


500,477 


529.973 


93,376 








94,982 


17,000 


20,147 


50,863 


6,972 








72,159 






58,691 


13,468 








Somerset 


84.163 


500 


65 


68,565 


15,033 








Talbot 


146,315 


50,000 


4,750 


75,857 


15,708 








Washington 


211,059 


30,000 


1,832 


102,082 


77,145 








Wicomico 


528,327 


280,000 


107,021 


119,171 


22,135 








Worcester 


102,400 


70,000 


19,200 




13,200 









* Includes $10,000 principal and $10,104 interest on current expense bonds, 
t For current expense. 



206 Ninetieth Annual Report 



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$39,158,689 

1,012,242 
2,128,083 
8,562,837 
7 184 107 
37,023 


556 ,450 
947 ,552 
572,610 
46,246 

741 ,528 


834 ,922 
46 ,790 
15 ,300 

7,078,658 
4,821 ,182 
'323 ',055 
528,612 
71 ,079 

432,771 
2,621,712 
351 ,828 
244,102 


$6,017,675 

18,466 
258 ,228 
1,440,691 
2 9*^0 017 
2 


105,282 
13,511 
31,445 


31,791 
640 
356 ,766 

110 107 

14,888 
8,513 
11,984 

7,099 
100,327 
525 
53 ,823 



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Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



208 



NiNETiETPi Annual Report 



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,275,819 


204 ,392 
271 ,856 
553,197 
399,193 
76,657 


83,678 
133,199 
121,390 
116,840 

99,190 


142,060 
136,625 
243 ,965 
101 350 
64,788 


463,300 
319,646 

82,724 
110,496 

73,018 


64 ,884 
178 ,496 
130,194 
104,681 















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1 


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School 
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$739,168 

20,872 
43 ,360 
160,395 
139,869 
3 ,729 

2 ,546 
16,561 
12,723 
5,712 
9,198 

23,155 
4,748 
20,519 
11,589 
4,289 

102,777 
83,845 
3,619 
7.292 
8,190 

4,994 
30,464 
11,280 

7,536 


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County 


Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



210 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



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213 



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Ninetieth Annual Report 



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County 
Name of High School 


Queen Anne's 

Sudlersvillc Sr.-Jr 

Centreville Sr.-Jr 

StevensviUe Sr.-Jr 


&r. Mary-'s 

Banneker Sr.-Jr 

Leonardtown Sr.-Jr 

Great Mills Sr.-Jr 

Jarboesville Sr.-Jr 

Somerset 

Marion Sr.-Jr 

Carter G. Woodson Sr.-Jr 

Crisfield Sr.-Jr 

Deal Island Sr.-Jr 

Ewell Jr 


Talbot 

Easton Sr.-Jr 

Robert Moton Sr.-Jr 

St. Michaels Sr.-Jr 

Hagerstown Sr 

Clear Spring Sr.-Jr 

Boonsboro Sr.-Jr 

Smithsburg Sr.-Jr 

Maugansville Sr.-Jr 

North St. Sr.-Jr 

South Potomac Jr 

Woodland Way Jr 

Washineton Jr 





Maryland State Department op Education 



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O CO C<l t--. CO 



CO UO <M U5 i-i 



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O CO CO CSl 
O ^ CO CO 



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o >c o 05 CO lo c<i 

■«ti CO T-H CO -f 



OOCOCOMO 



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216 Ninetieth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII— Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each Maryland Cou 





Total 
























Counts 


Enroll- 


Core 


English 


Social 


Scie 


nee 


Mathe- 


La 


^&inc of tli^li Schoo 


ment 










Studies 






matics 






B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


Q 


B 


G 


g 


1 Allegant 


3,772 


3,504 


491 


363 


3,270 


3,138 


3 133 


2,885 


3 131 


2 676 


2 930 


2 617 


317 


2 Oldtown Sr -Jr 


94 


109 






93 


109 


' 94 


'l09 


' 87 


104 


' 90 


'lOl 




3 Fliiit.'5tone Sr -Jr 


117 


117 


20 


i4 


97 


103 


97 


103 


92 


97 


105 


87 




4 Fort Hill Sr -Jr 


973 


931 


61 


27 


905 


901 


885 


781 


799 


686 


735 


692 


90 


5 Allegany Sr -Jr 


799 


746 


25 


9 


772 


737 


736 


692 


627 


548 


529 


459 


77 




330 


299 


17 


17 


313 


282 


290 


267 


296 


222 


238 


228 


31 




358 


371 


130 


125 


228 


246 


191 


201 


278 


283 


292 


286 


33 


8 Mt. Savage Sr -Jr. 


269 


203 


46 


27 


223 


176 


187 


151 


209 


154 


218 


156 


28 


9 Beall Sr -Jr 


470 


426 


24 


4 


445 


422 


444 


411 


381 


280 


376 


314 


58 


10 Crcssptown Jr 


ISO 


97 


58 


35 


72 


62 


72 


62 


130 


97 


130 


97 




11 Carver Jr. 


27 


22 






27 


22 


27 


22 


27 


22 


27 


22 




12 Penn Ave Elem -Jr 


95 


97 


95 


97 










95 


97 


95 


97 




1 3 Beall Elem - Jr 


110 


86 


15 


8 


95 


78 


110 


86 


110 


86 


95 


78 




14 Anne Arundel 


5,327 
586 


5,557 


3,361 


3,333 


1,966 


2,223 


1,813 


1,986 


3,358 


3,373 


4,406 


4 ,315 


94 


15 Glen Burnie Sr 


588 






586 


588 


525 


458 


289 


308 


307 


275 


31 




409 


479 






409 


479 


409 


479 


220 


296 


282 


251 


19 




245 


234 






245 


234 


243 


220 


229 


182 


180 


154 




18 Arundel Sr -Jr 


568 


639 


399 


432 


169 


207 


169 


205 


326 


346 


522 


538 




19 Brooklyn Park Sr -Jr 


711 


785 


488 


488 


223 


297 


223 


297 


484 


464 


411 


405 


35 


20 Bates Sr -J'. 


966 


1,042 


632 


623 


334 


418 


244 


327 


457 


470 


862 


902 


9 


21 George Fox Jr 


533 


501 


533 


501 










335 


331 


533 


501 




22 Glen Burnie Jr 


600 


543 


600 


543 










350 


320 


600 


543 




23 Annapolis Jr 


709 


746 


709 


746 










668 


656 


709 


746 




24 Baltimore 


12419 


12022 


8,172 


7,517 


4,242 


4,505 


4,234 


4,451 


10987 


9 ,916 


10916 


10137 


359 


25 Catonsville Sr. 


616 


628 




616 


628 


610 


628 


506 


367 


453 


383 


63 


26 Towson Sr 


824 


945 


281 


272 


541 


673 


543 


619 


662 


620 


669 


676 


79 


27 Dundalk Sr. 


582 


538 






582 


538 


582 


538 


415 


274 


387 


251 


41 


28 Kenwood Sr 


978 


977 






978 


977 


978 


977 


705 


587 


587 


575 


94 


29 Banneker Sr -Jr 


109 


113 


69 


75 


40 


38 


40 


38 


99 


111 


85 


100 




30 Milford Mill Sr.-Jr. 


1,013 


1,053 


670 


644 


343 


409 


337 


409 


924 


884 


834 


883 


37 


31 Franklin Sr - Jr 


448 


494 


297 


308 


150 


186 


150 


186 


410 


421 


381 


421 


12 


32 Hereford Sr -Jr 


487 


450 


319 


269 


168 


181 


168 


181 


145 


136 


386 


353 




33 Carver Sr - Jr 


211 


18-9 


149 


126 


62 


63 


62 


63 


184 


180 


163 


164 




34 Sollers Point Sr -Jr 


462 


430 


330 


284 


132 


146 


132 


146 


417 


400 


431 


365 




35 Parkville Sr -Jr 


970 


923 


600 


528 


368 


395 


370 


395 


863 


752 


896 


782 


33 


36 Sparrows Point Sr -Jr 


555 


540 


293 


269 


262 


271 


262 


271 


493 


442 


480 


442 




37 Catonsville Jr 


1 109 
'688 


1 006 


1,109 
688 


1 ,006 










1,109 
688 


1 ,:06 


1 ,109 


1 006 






'647 


647 










647 


688 


'647 




39 Carroll Manor Jr. 


89 


84 


89 


84 










89 


84 


89 


84 




40 North Point Jr 


1 ,161 


1,081 


1,161 


1,081 










1 ,161 


1 ,081 


1,161 


1,081 




41 Golden Ring Jr 


819 


723 


819 


723 










'819 


723 


819 


723 






1,140 


1,061 


1,140 


1,061 










1,140 


1,061 


1 ,140 


1,061 






85 


67 


85 


67 










85 


67 


85 


67 




44 Sparrows Point Elem -Jr 


73 


73 


73 


73 










73 


73 


73 


73 




45 Calvert 


640 


625 


165 


147 


474 


476 


472 


477 


483 


455 


540 


514 


25 


46 Calvert Count}' Sr -Jr 


287 


282 


50 


54 


236 


226 


234 


227 


198 


180 


228 


21C 


25 


47 \V. S. Brooks Sr.-Jr. 


294 


299 


86 


70 


208 


229 


208 


229 


255 


254 


253 


260 




48 Beach Jr 


59 


44 


29 


23 


30 


21 


30 


21 


30 


21 


59 


44 




49 Caroline 


803 


803 






803 


803 


802 


798 


680 


674 


642 


626 


30 


50 Greensboro Sr -Jr 


138 


175 






138 


175 


138 


173 


113 


141 


108 


129 


5 


51 Caroline Sr.-Jr. 


191 


188 






191 


188 


191 


188 


173 


163 


148 


133 


12 


52 LockcriTisn Sr -Jr 


173 


177 






173 


177 


173 


177 


140 


150 


143 


154 




53 Preston Sr -Jr 


81 


73 






81 


73 


80 


73 


69 


63 


55 


57 


4 


54 Fedprslsburg Sr.-Jr 


165 


143 






165 


143 


165 


143 


135 


115 


138 


111 


9 


55 Ridgely Sr -Jr 


55 


47 






55 


47 


55 


44 


50 


42 


50 


42 




56 Carroll 


2,041 


1 ,944 


960 


822 


1,071 


1,172 


1,063 


1,159 


1 862 


1 ,680 


1,518 


1,410 


53 


^7 Tanpvt/^wn Sr - Tr 


1 yo 


201 


91 


84 


104 


117 


104 


117 


168 


'l76 


187 


164 


20 


Svkp<?villp Sp -Tr 


236 




130 


106 


106 


124 


106 


124 


229 


199 








/^Q M anpKpctAr Sr Tr 


200 


194 


102 


65 


98 


129 


98 


129 


197 


162 


168 


155 




60 Robert Moton Sr-Jr 


96 


107 


32 


44 


64 


63 


64 


63 


94 


99 


79 


87 




R1 WfHitminQfpr Sr Tr 


609 


577 


234 


220 


375 


357 


375 


357 


540 


464 


505 


424 


33 


62 Hampstead Sr.-Jr 


135 


139 


55 


56 


70 


83 


80 


83 


120 


111 


101 


123 




63 New Windsor Sr.-Jr. . . 


119 


157 


59 


62 


60 


95 


60 


95 


119 


136 


103 


133 




M Flmpr Wnlfp Sr Tr 


108 


107 


48 


35 


60 


72 


55 


59 


91 


82 


76 


94 




65 Mount Airy Sr -Jr 


223 


199 


106 


83 


117 


116 


104 


116 


184 


168 


179 


147 




66 Charles Carroll Jr 


70 


52 


53 


36 


17 


16 


17 


16 


70 


62 


70 


52 






24 


13 


24 


13 










24 


13 


24 


13 




f^R \f pph:inintivlllp T^lom Tr 


ID 


1 1 
1 1 


16 


11 










16 


11 


16 


11 


•■ 


69 Johnsville Elem.-Jr. 


10 


7 


10 


7 










10 


7 


10 


7 


•■| 


70 Cecil 


1,512 


1 .595 

88 


562 


577 


951 


1,018 


951 


1,016 


1 ,386 


1 ,327 


1,285 


1,325 


46 




100 


46 


36 


54 


52 


54 


52 


100 


69 


89 


78 




72 Chesapeake City Sr.-Jr 


85 


90 






85 


90 


85 


89 




70 


61 


78 




73 G. \\. Carver Sr.-Jr 


100 


109 


i8 


24 


82 


85 


82 


85 


83 


100 


100 


109 


'? 


74 Elkton Sr.-Jr 


428 


432 


189 


201 


239 


231 


239 


230 


365 


367 


368 


349 


75 North East Sr.-Jr 


293 


298 


139 


128 


155 


170 


155 


170 


278 


233 


249 


233 




76 Rising Sun Sr.-Jr 


260 


324 


122 


139 


138 


185 


138 


185 


239 


266 


199 


252 


23 


77 Perrvville Sr.-Jr 


181 


183 






181 


183 


181 


183 


177 


151 


154 


155 




25 


34 


17 


26 


8 




8 


8 


25 


34 


25 


34 






40 


37 


31 


23 


9 


14l 


9 


14 


40 


37 


40 


37 ..1 



Maryland State Department of Education 217 
I ic High School : Fall of 1955 







Spanish 


Atrri- 
culture 


IndustrialJ 


Home 
Econom 


cs 


Business 
Subjects 


Phv 
Educ 


ioal 
ation 








Gen. 


ti 

Voc. 1 Arts 


Edu. 


G( 




b 

Voc. 




an- 


and 


Crafts 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 




B 


G 




G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 




G 


1 

64i 90 


80 


82 


45 




1,972 


6 


155 




1 ,491 


480 


606 


865 


2,477 


2,205 


2 ,398 


2 ,405 


1 ,293 




1 ,241 










45 




26 








37 


54 






94 


108 


94 


109 


49 


40 












43 


52 








45 


49 






97 


76 


93 


95 










39 


21 






485 


6 


65 




398 


97 


93 


265 


525 


559 


548 


557 


320 


350 


9 


'8 


41 


61 






380 




22 




315 


48 


237 


247 


498 


423 


468 


47(i 


276 


293 


6 


15 










197 








111 


74 


41 


62 


183 


172 


241 


25C 






11 


98 










223 








182 


AO 
til 


115 


132 






209 


275 


163 


174 














208 








86 


31 


19 


42 


244 


138 


138 


147 


181 


125 


38 


39 










244 




68 




198 


85 


101 


117 


250 


203 


245 


200 


194 


173 














130 








97 








130 


97 


130 


97 


















27 








22 








10 


8 


27 


22 


































95 


97 


95 


97 


































110 


86 


110 


86 


110 


86 


131 


494 


270 


323 


92 


81 


3 ,154 


13 


412 


12 


3,499 


52 


288 


1 ,216 


5,369 


5,135 


3 ,260 


3,647 


2,784 


2,609 


79 


68 


• • 


■ ■ 






239 


13 


208 




148 




51 


331 


408 


192 


113 


335 


52 


73 


79 


101 


44 


22 






288 








126 




68 


271 


328 


269 


97 


165 


45 


78 


22 


24 








47 


92 








105 




27 


79 


917 


loo 






50 




72 


74 








34 


298 








319 




41 


93 


472 


503 


259 


288 


302 


3i5 


30 


21 


• • 


• • 






595 








614 




76 


285 


655 


626 


434 


511 


466 


430 


LOg 


116 


226 


301 


92 




319 




204 




620 


52 


25 


157 


1,456 


1,574 


756 


801 


304 


239 














533 








501 








533 


501 


458 


428 


449 


387 














350 








320 








591 


540 


560 


511 


523 


462 


4i 


90 










440 








746 








709 


742 


583 


608 


593 


625 


i63 


477 


341 


312 


27 


101 


7,368 


8 


297 


101 


6,426 


23 


923 


2 ,904 


12362 


11952 


8,783 


8,703 


8,490 


7,804 
84 


62 


55 


37 


40 






362 


1 


58 




321 




186 


399 


609 


606 


124 


141 


78 


80 


98 


138 


153 






423 




68 




517 




119 


335 


823 


945 


242 


385 


304! 327 


98 


31 










334 


6 






157 




104 


308 


582 


538 


82 


150 


66 




59 


63 


10Q 

1Z6 


70 
10 






524 




134 




227 




103 


670 


943 


949 


155 


300 


90 


38 


10 


28 










90 








85 




2 


10 


109 


113 


79 


102 


109; 113 


60 


91 










549 


1 






501 




79 


257 


1.013 1,053 


717 


747 


723 


685 


10 


17 








56 


259 








234 




32 


134 


443 


482 


326 


358 


307 


323 


24 


31 








51 


254 








245 




64 


160 


487 


450 


374 


315 


211 


183 














150 








142 




33 


31 


211 


189 


178 


165 


168 


142 


is 


21 










278 








257 




39 


131 


462 


430 


462 


430 


272 


258 


29 


33 










586 








486 




89 


239 


961 


915 


663 


658 


668 


565 


18 


9 










513 








363 




73 


230 


555 


540 


217 


210 


330 


298 














690 








675 








1,109 1,006 1,1091,006 1,109 


1,006 














358 








323 








688 


647 


688 


647 


688 


647 














56 








55 








89 


84 


89 


84 


89 


84 














700 








674 








1,16111,081 1,161,1,081 1,1611,081 














512 








473 








819 


723 


819 


723 


819 


723 














730 








691 








1,140 


1,061 


1,140 1,061 


1,1401,061 






























85 


67 


85 


67 


85 


67 






























73 


73 


73 


73 


73 


73 


23 
16 


35 








81 


283 








352 


110 


103 


140 


545 


506 


353 


387 


212 


44 


15 








19 


216 








153 


53 


74 


89 


210 


184 


122 


157 






7 


20 








62 


67 








199 


57 


29 


51 


276 


278 


220 


226 


153 
































59 


44 


11 


4 


59 


44 


9 


16 






61 


128 


524 


10 






559 


40 


131 


202 


771 


753 


498 


639 








6 

10 










111 








101 




46 


65 


127 


163 


89 


151 






'9 








52 


108 


16 






137 




22 


41 


177 


157 


125 


163 
















48 


123 








121 


40 


33 


44 


169 


174 


159 


171 
















28 


38 








59 








79 


73 


41 


37 














36 




114 








94 




25 


47 


164 


139 


84 


117 














25 




30 








47 




5 


5 


55 


47 










79 


104 








76 


1,208 


7 


29 




1 ,029 


74 


428 


663 


1,870 


1,788 


1,700 


1,761 


502 


506 


io 










17 


1261 .. 






119 




34 


62 


185 


177 


153 


178 


47 


46 


is 










148 








129 




68 


96 


234 


229 


191 


187 


56 


55 


15 


22 










112 








91 




51 


68 


199 


194 


172 


148 






17 












82 








49 


35 


19 


28 


96 
480 


107 


96 


107 


i2 


i4 


30 










361 


'7 






255 


39 


124 


196 


425 


490 


542 


225 


257 


9 


8 










79 








86 




20 


44 


125 


138 


91 


94 


29 


32 


2 


5 










83 








102 




35 


65 


106 


144 


107 


145 


36 


34 


8 
18 


12 








28 


52 








56 




30 


42 


107 


103 


89 


106 


23 


17 


9 








31 


119 








110 




47 


62 


219 


189 


191 


171 


















46 








32 








69 


51 


70 


52 


24 


26 






























24 
16 


13 


24 


13 


24 


13 






























11 


16 


11 


16 


11 






























10 


7 


10 


7 


10 


7 


32 


58 


28 


20 




45 


493 








1,047 


32 


273 


511 


1,280 


1,150 

66 


958 


1,198 
60 


420 


256 


5 


9 










87 








57 




16 


27 


100 


78 


























79 




19 


33 


79 


57 


25 


41 






27 


49 










77 








66 


32 


20 


27 


100 


109 


71 


74 


is 












53 








312 




82 


125 


364 


294 


222 


303 


135 


24 






'8 


i 














135 




62 


98 


202 


193 


224 


256 


82 


74 






20 


19 




45 


ii4 








194 




54 


145 


240 


237 


125 


225 


136 


158 














146 








133 




20 


56 


130 


123 


149 


168 


















16 








34 








25 


34 


24 


34 


'9 
























37 








40 


37 


40 


37 


40 





218 Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates : Each Marylai 





Total 


























Enroll- 


Core 


English 


Social 


Science 


Mathe- 


Latin 


County 


ment 










Studies 






matics 




r^ame oi ilign ochooi 
































G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


1 — 
( 




1,206 


1,246 


517 


491 


689 


755 


668 


745 


1,034 


1,088 


1,068 


1,073 


1* 




T ^ Clo + n <3- T- 


323 


309 






323 


309 


OiO 


ouy 


275 


235 


235 


193 


17 






216! 239 


lOl 


1 00 


70 


117 
1 1 / 


79 


117 


1 R7 
10/ 


000 


189 


227 








273: 315 


159 


173 


114 


142 


95 


136 


212 


291 


271 


315 








264 


270 


142 


114 


122 


156 


120 


152 


250 


220 


243 


225 








33 


31 


33 


31 










33 


31 


33 


31 








51 31 






51 


31 


51 


si 


51 


31 


51 


31 








46 


« 


46 


51 










46 


51 


46 


51 








1,079 


1,090 


229 


225 


850 


865 


779 


811 


916 


890 


880 


856 


27 




in r^rtT^Vvi-i^/^rt Q» 


270 


248 






270 


248 


222 


209 


205 


134 


199 


138 


22 






240; 253 


142 


152 


98 


101 


96 


98 


210 


207 


187 


184 


• • 






83; 109 






83 


109 


09 

CO 


1 no 
luy 


77 


92 


651 81 


5 




19 Xfnrtrt'n T Q» T- 


309 


280 


97 


79 
1 




0fl7 


201 


195 


017 


0?7 


252 


253 






1 1 T- 


177 


200 






177 


200 


177 


200 


177 


200 


177 


200 






15 Frederick 


2,577 


2,588 


1,518 


1,472 

69 


1,059 


1,116 


945 


1,004 


1,562 


1,397 


2,041 


1,931 


176 






203 


221 


65 


138 


152 


115 


152 


162 


159 


138 


147 


■ ■ 




17 TT^rt^^^wIrtl-- C« T» 


639 


684 


139 


151 


500 


533 


462 


455 


506 


446 


404 


367 


113 




1Q \fU,Jlrt + rtT*™ T- 


340 


311 


224 


186 


116 


125 


93 


110 


187 


125 


249 


230 


16 






104 


85 


68 


59 


36 


26 


36 


26 


36 


26 


89 


71 


7 




20 Thurmont Sr.-Jr 


290 


07K 


163 


159 


127 


116 


97 


97 


157 


105 


09 < 


01 9 

Zlo 


19 






204 


220 


127 


125 


77 


95 


77 


95 


84 


93 


144 


142 








153 


151 


88 


82 


65 


69 


65 


69 


90 


101 


139 


120 






09 T?l»^ Qt'mnn* T» 


567 


564 


567 


564 










294 


288 


567 


564 


21 




OA T T- 


77 


77 


77 


77 










46 


54 


77 


77 






OE rt 


1,020 


973 


863 


823 


157 


1 sn 
loU 


157 


150 


352 


385 


788 


691 






OA \^rt»+kr»»T^ T— 


409 


387 


252 


237 


157 


150 


157 


150 


147 


169 


299 


266 






Z/ boutnern uarrett or.-Jr 


596 


562 


596 


562 










205 


216 


474 


401 






28 Kitzmiller Elem.-Jr. 


15 


24 


15 


24 














15 


24 






29 Harford 


2,5'61 


2,491 


1,674 


1 ,571 


887 


920 


771 


777 


1,146 


1,028 


2,286 


2,049 


71 






426 


394 


299 


269 


127 


125 


123 


107 


160 


140 


387 


330 


29 




61 nSLYTe ae Urace L/Onsol. br.-Jr. 


140 


90 


95 


60 


45 


30 


45 


30 


104 


82 


119 


76 






6Z Lentral Lonsol. or.-Jr 


173 


151 


93 


81 


80 


70 


78 


53 


111 




138 


103 






99 TJni A s;. T- 


766 


779 


437 


456 


329 


323 


262 


260 


333 


270 


707 


619 


28 




94 v^»*-u u^.r^-^ o_ T_ 


446 


489 


303 


278 


143 


211 


143 


192 


184 


213 


356 


381 


2 






314 


351 


200 


233 


114 


118 


100 


117 


149 


134 


283 


303 


12 






296 


237 


247 


194 


49 


43 


20 


18 


105 


91 


296 


237 






01 X10WA.RD 


1,127 


1,139 


520 


470 


607 


669 


525 


571 


1 ,000 


926 


870 


805 


1 9 




90 XJ^nrnw^ f^mtrtl-w, 


261 


302 






261 


302 


179 


205 


190 


170 


94 


89 


1 9 






161 


167 


79 


7i 


82 


96 


82 


95 


121 


106 


128 


102 








235 


208 


103 


93 


132 


115 


132 


115 


219 


188 


178 


152 








188 


191 


138 


129 


50 


62 


50 


62 


188 


191 


188 


191 








174 


181 


125 


118 


49 


63 


49 


63 


174 


181 


174 


181 








108 


90 


75 


59 


33 


31 


33 


31 


108 


90 


108 


90 






44 Kent 


642 


584 






642 


583 


642 


583 


557 


514 


506 


472 


31 




AK r^«l„«rt T- 


86 


83 






86 


83 


86 


83 


78 


80 


80 


81 


8 






256 


232 






256 


232 


256 


232 


208 


195 


190 


176 


19 






196 


182 






196 


182 


196 


182 


168 


160 


158 


153 


• ■ 






104 


87 






104 


86 


104 


86 


103 


79 


78 


62 


4 




49 Montgomery 


8,440 


8,281 


292 


262 


8,136 


8,013 


7,525 


7,456 


5,064,4,507 


7,475 


6,339 


KK9 
000 






153 


207 






153 


207 


117 


177 


103 


98 


102 


118 






Cl T5«*U-,«-4_ ^1 o 


993 


1,067 






992 


1,066 
963 


760 


833 


765 


690 




503 


lei 




CO x*«.,*_«-w,* Di o 


993 


965 






991 


803 


820 


747 


614 


792 


359 


83 




CO T>«-,i«^_.: n _ L?_ T_ 


137 


134 






137 


134 


137 


134 


63 


86 


107 


94 








421 


346 






421 


346 


364 


298 


283 


238 


289 


181 


4i 




55 Sherwood iSr.-Jr 


448 


428 






445 


427 


448 


428 


250 


238 


376 


321 


21 






460 


427 






454 


426 


422 


410 


243 


233 


347 


303 


17 






189 


187 






189 


187 


179 


183 


119 


109 


180 


162 


37 






979 


919 






979 


919 


920 


835 


612 


514 


839 


700 




59 Lincoln Jr. 


214 


232 






214 


232 


214 


232 


111 


138 


213 


232 






60 Rockville Jr 


320 


292 






320 


292 


320 


292 


148 


144 


320 


292 








432 


455 






432 


455 


432 


455 


224 


185 


432 


455 


36 
43 






416 


428 






416 


428 


416 


428 


202 


192 


416 


426 




63 North Bethesda Jr 


319 


300 


292 


262 


27 


37 


27 


37 


141 


120 


319 


299 


29 






497 


503 






497 


503 


497 


503 


297 


272 


497 


503 


7 






500 


508 






500 


508 


500 


508 


271 


241 


500 


508 


23 






414 


377 






414 


377 


414 


377 


210 


159 


414 


377 


27 






555 


506 






555 


506 


555 


506 


275 


236 


555 


506 


28 





Maryland State Department of Education 219 



^ iy Public High School : Fall of 1955 



ench 






Ag, 
cult 


ri- 
ure 


Industria 




Home 
Econom 


cs 






Music 


Art-Arts 
and Crafts 








* 

Gen. 


Voc. 


Arts 


°a 
Edu. 


G6 


n. 


b 

Voc. 


Sub; 




Educ 


itioD 


■ 

^ B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


65 


98 






63 


252 


375 








597 


87 


136 


343 


1 ,027 


931 


849 


843 


464 


290 


10 


12 








52 


95 








201 




63 


140 


266 


246 


173 


167 


131 




9 


30 








95 


96 








84 


49 


9 


40 


193 


178 


167 


217 


59 


57 


10 


27 








94 


151 








132 


38 


28 


89 


236 


235 


217 


226 


140 


163 


36 


29 


















98 




36 


74 


205 


159 


189 


137 


111 


70 














33 
















30 


31 


6 


14 














28 












3i 








51 


31 


51 


31 


23 












35 


11 










51 








46 


51 


46 


51 






60 


90 








145 


603 








566 


63 


216 


337 


1 ,036 


1 ,062 


775 


687 


364 


385 


23 


31 










177 








138 




116 


126 


235 


233 


172 


144 


147 


130 


19 


30 








70 


173 








211 




74 


108 


240 


251 


209 


183 


















70 








82 




25 


33 




96 






40 


55 


18 


29 








75 


183 








135 


63 


1 


70 


307 


282 


2i7 


160 


































177 


200 


177 


200 


177 


200 


73 


107 






41 


299 


1,319 








1,369 
98 


87 


356 


746 


2,399 


2,232 


1,735 


1 ,846 


1 ,055 


1 ,061 














187 








47 


32 


36 


203 


221 


198 


206 


24 


30 


36 


31 








92 


281 








360 




149 


390 


523 


407 


246 


273 


68 


63 


3 


14 








88 


136 








96 


40 


56 


80 


319 


287 


^f- 


155 


152 


111 












27 


80 








84 








104 


85 


8/ 


85 






io 


26 








39 


164 








154 




20 


121 


265 


253 


169 


217 


148 


159 


10 


15 










79 








102 




67 


79 


188 


187 


146 


132 


84 


84 


14 


21 








53 










92 




32 


40 


153 


151 


52 


137 


12 


50 














3i5 








306 








567 


564 


567 


564 


567 


564 














77 








77 








77 


77 


77 


77 






48 


59 


16 


12 




229 


630 








494 


154 


116 


340 


829 


677 


727 


766 


584 


489 


12 


23 








129 


220 








166 


43 




123 


320 


291 


278 


306 


175 


151 


36 


36 








100 


410 








328 


111 


73 


217 


494 


362 


449 


460 


394 


314 






























15 


24 






15 


24 


15U 


165 








177 


1,624 




35 




1 ,592 




178 


612 


2,157 


1 ,905 


2,097 


2,093 


1,161 


1,129 


23 


15 










238 








210 




46 


89 


346 


293 


326 


322 


128 


114 




• • 










104 








72 








140 


90 


140 


90 


36 


18 


1ft 
lU 


20 










132 








123 




36 


6i 


171 


135 


132 


151 


36 


16 


63 


64 








56 


622 








627 




36 


241 


605 


539 


582 


579 


455 


480 


22 


43 








121 


189 








263 




14 


117 


354 


346 


446 


477 


220 


188 


15 


12 










159 








173 




38 


79 


261 


290 


215 


279 


187 


221 


17 


11 










180 








124 






25 


280 


212 


256 


195 


99 


92 


1 21 


21 








192 


556 






1 


677 


37 


256 


395 


U009 


900 


773 


929 


38 


55 


' 9 


5 








74 


126 








92 




179 


270 


177 


112 


49 


164 


38 


55 




7 








70 










112 




32 


86 


154 


143 


86 


125 








9 








48 


99 








132 


37 


45 


59 


208 


183 


187 


180 


















115 








126 








188 


191 


169 


189 


















10« 








125 








174 


181 


174 


181 


















108 








90 








108 


90 


108 


90 






lo 


29 


8 


4 




75 


497 








393 


39 


71 


162 


603 


537 


515 


483 


217 


174 














73 








62 




19 


15 


86 


80 


82 


67 


55 


55 






8 


14 




47 


180 








160 




27 


88 


217 


189 


174 


185 






15 


29 








28 


153 








113 


39 


15 


34 


196 


182 


190 


182 


97 


72 














91 








58 




10 


25 


104 


86 


69 


49 


65 


47 


' 14 


689 


433 


439 


61 


136 


0,264 


270 


619 




3,853 


328 


902 


2 ,163 


7,116 


6,497 


3,905 


4,234 


2,488 


2,735 


lO 


26 










52 


38 


153 




20 


22 


3 


67 


91 


107 


42 


75 


40 


58 


93 


212 


201 


206 






577 


89 


30 




168 


33 


172 


495 


832 


737 


238 


367 


77 


178 


89 


134 


165 


161 








ss 

Oo 


110 




223 


44 


302 


622 


722 


496 




214 


Qfi 

yo 


1 fi7 
10/ 


t • • 










40 


98 








60 


19 


15 


41 


133 


125 


83 


94 


76 


70 


I 


12 


i9 


17 






140 


'8 


143 




79 


51 


101 


189 


331 


219 


73 


141 


34 


37 


1 21 


29 


5 


3 






396 


9 


53 




225 


109 


0/ 




oUl 


070 


281 


259 


250 


232 


I • • 




10 


14 




59 


277 


5 






170 




64 


178 


386 


351 


134 


168 


66 


54 


1 29 


17 








37 


115 








124 




9 


39 


179 


158 


80 


116 






1 35 


27 


33 


38 






360 




130 




183 




88 


290 


632 


591 


250 


253 


98 


lis 














141 


'6 






165 








140 


200 


85 


57 


57 


19 














320 








292 








320 


292 


320 


292 


320 


292 


1 23 


48 










220 


27 






193 




54 


87 


389 


365 


341 


387 


129 


146 


f 15 


42 










346 








332 




37 


49 


415 


426 


326 


335 


263 


300 


f 18 


23 










173 








141 








317 


298 


257 


265 


116 


129 


1 11 


40 










431 








402 








493 


503 


255 


309 


107 


153 


1 13 


22 










396 








427 








500 


508 


426 


434 


344 


385 


1 23 


33 










390 








338 








380 


343 


402 


340 


310 


300 


f 24 


24 










300 








311 








555 


506 


164 


128 


105 


100 



220 Ninetieth Annual Report 



TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each Mar; 





Total 


























Enroll- 


Core 


English 


Social 


Science 


Mathe- 


Li 


COTJJfTY 


ment 










Studies 






matics 




Name of High Schoo 
































G 




Q 




Q 


B 


Q 


B 


G 


B 


Q 


B 


1 Prince George's 


9 273 


9 285 


6 302 


6 149 


2 970 


3 134 


2 776 


2 776 


4 113 


3 629 


7 723 


6 850 




261 


2 Bladensbursc Sr. 


'832 


'711 




831 


'711 


800 


589 


'333 


'347 


362 


218 


7; 


3 Oxon Hill Sr 


293 


305 


86 


95 


207 


209 


176 


168 


230 


195 


181 


147 






667 


781 






667 


781 


605 


661 


470 


401 


497 


328 


16^ 


5 High Point Sr.-Jr 


936 


946 


575 


551 


361 


395 


296 


325 


388 


328 


798 


670 


5: 




244 


248 


211 


209 


33 


39 


33 


39 


121 


93 


158 


151 




7 Douglass Sr.-Jr 


353 


377 


239 


219 


114 


158 


114 


156 


158 


212 


287 


291 






683 


754 


202 


185 


481 


568 


480 


569 


607 


500 


507 


336 


31 




329 


315 


213 


197 


116 


118 


115 


116 


151 


110 


302 


249 




10 Laurel Sr.-Jr 


281 


255 


175 


156 


106 


99 


103 


97 


140 


104 


255 


184 




11 Gwynn Park Sr.-Jr 


261 


260 


207 


204 


54 


56 


54 


56 


115 


100 


211 


201 




12 Fairmount Heights Sr.-Jr 


658 


698 


658 


698 










308 


396 


440 


446 






570 


563 


570 


563 










173 


171 


570 


563 




14 Suitland Jr 


571 


512 


571 


512 














571 


512 




15 Oxon Hi" Jr 


268 


256 


268 


256 










268 




268 


256 






607 


635 


607 


635 










182 


182 


607 


635 






392 


393 


392 


393 










121 


129 


392 


393 






412 


347 


412 


347 










112 


103 


401 


341 






361 


373 


361 


373 










113 


114 


361 


373 




20 Greenbelt Jr. 


397 


396 


397 


396 










103 


121 


397 


396 




21 Lakeland Jr. 


80 


93 


80 


93 










20 


23 


80 


93 




22 Lincoln Elem.-Jr 


78 


67 


78 


67 














78 


67 




23 Queen AnxVe's 


683 


675 


119 


115 


562 


558 


551 


544 


564 


542 


530 


505 




24 Sudlersville Sr.-Jr 


147 


165 






145 


163 


147 


165 


110 


121 


94 


96 




25 Centreville Sr.-Jr 


245 


213 


33 


35 


212 


178 


200 


162 


206 


173 


196 


172 






183 


174 


86 


80 


97 


94 


97 


94 


155 


151 


174 


158 




27 Stevensville Sr.-Jr. 


108 


123 






108 


123 


107 


123 


93 


97 


66 


79 




28 St. Mary's 


750 


767 


340 


291 


410 


476 


404 


476 


690 


643 


664 


615 


5: 


29 Banneker Sr.-Jr 


166 


176 


117 


91 


49 


85 


49 


85 


157 


145 


143 


146 






93 


93 


67 


52 


26 


41 


26 


41 


92 


87 


88 


72 






165 


165 


99 


81 


66 


84 


60 


84 


135 


115 


136 


113 




32 Great Mills Sr.-Jr. 


249 


z50 






249 


250 


249 


250 


229 


213 


220 


201 


4. 




77 


83 


57 


67 


20 


16 


20 


16 


77 


83 


77 


83 




34 Somerset 


808 


806 


453 


386 


355 


420 


354 


415 


767 


747 


731 


736 


2: 


35 Washington Sr.-Jr. 


170 


173 


107 


103 


63 


70 


63 


69 


152 


153 


151 


145 






49 


70 


21 


31 


28 


39 


28 


36 


43 


56 


44 


57 




37 Carter G. Woodson Sr.-Jr 


109 


86 


25 


17 


84 


69 


84 


69 


109 


86 


109 


86 






199 


192 


140 


116 


59 


76 


58 


76 


182 


167 


192 


168 


2; 


39 Deal Island Sr -Jr 


46 


52 


29 


26 


17 


26 


17 


25 


46 


52 


42 


47 






227 


216 


131 


93 


96 


123 


96 


123 


227 


216 


185 


216 




41 Ewell Jr ' 




17 










17 




17 


g 


17 


g 


17 




42 Talbot 


767 


834 


269 


291 


497 


543 


496 


531 


696 


725 


632 


671 


4! 




396 


421 


166 


169 


230 


252 


229 


240 


351 


363 


325 


338 


2i 


44 Robert Moton Sr.-Jr 


232 


260 


103 


122 


128 


138 


128 


138 


225 


248 


186 


217 




45 St. Michaels Sr.-Jr 


139 


153 






139 


153 


139 


153 


120 


114 


121 


116 


2! 




3.582 


3,459 


1,482 


1,457 


2 ,097 


2,002 


1,732 


1,809 


2,912 


2,517 


2,930 


2,604 


11 




821 


778 


821 


778 


491 


602 


525 


381 


423 


244 


3: 




077 


Oil 


124 


89 


153 


152 


150 


139 


238 


186 


210 


168 






oee 




1 1 1; 


1 HQ 


1 7'5 


172 


168 


168 


266 


234 


225 


201 


1. 




1 nt: 


ono 


Q 1 

o4 


87 
0/ 


1 1 fl 


122 


110 


122 


160 


177 


185 


188 






529 


464 


116 


yo 


A^'^ 


ooy 


384 


366 


505 


376 


457 


370 


i' 




1 70 


OIK 


7f; 


94 




122 


104 


125 


179 


195 


137 


169 






46 


63 


OT 


38 


23 


25 


23 


25 


46 


63 


46 


63 




54 North tit. Sr.-Jr 


77 


64 


48 


38 


29 


26 


29 


26 


74 


58 


77 


57 








Q07 


280 


280 


122 


117 


122 


117 


392 


368 


402 


397 


ii 








oUO 


97Q 


1 m 
101 


1 1Q 
113 


1 SI 
101 


119 


456 


398 


456 


398 


li 


57 Washington Jr . 


"J 1 9 


oHby 














71 

/ 1 


81 


312 


349 


l: 


58 Wicomico 


1,662 


1,609 






1 662 


1 609 


1,547 


1,471 


I 434 


1 305 


1,295 


1,223 


14; 




396 


390 






'396 


'390 


358 


368 


' '239 


'2O8 


191 


157 


4: 




110 


94 






110 


94 


101 


90 


102 


73 


64 


54 






89 


87 






89 


87 


88 


84 


83 


78 


72 


63 






425 


380 






425 


380 


415 


364 


377 


303 


326 


291 


31 




627 


641 






627 


641 


570 


548 


618 


626 


627 


641 


6' 




15 


17 






15 


17 


15 


17 


15 


17 


15 


17 






1 ,002 


917 


628 


565 


373 


352 


346 


336 


509 


488 


749 


720 


3: 




166 


146 


100 


85 


66 


61 


66 


60 


68 


66 


131 


112 




67 Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 


]64 


174 


92 


97 


72 


77 


71 


77 


96 


120 


135 


128 


i 


68 Stephen Decatur Sr.-Jr 


326 


313 


194 


182 


131 


131 


105 


116 


206 


192 


253 


266 


li 




346 


284 


242 


201 


104 


83 


104 


83 


139 


110 


230 


214 



• Includes the following number of girls taking General Agriculture: Prince George's, Gwynn Park Sr.-Jr. — 11. 

t Ifif hides the following number of girls taking Vocational Agriculture: Carroll, Taneytown Sr-Jr. — 1 ; Frederick, Emraits- 
bure Sr.-Jr.— I; Howard, Howard County Sr.— 8 

X Includfs the following number of boys and girls taking Diversified Occupations: Baltimore, Dundalk Sr. — 18 boys, 
6 girLs; Kenwood Sr.— 18 boys. 11 girls; Cecil, Elkton Sr.-.Jr.— 10 boys, 6 girls; Montgomery, Montgomery Blair Sr.— 10 
boys, 35 girls; Gaithersburg Sr.-Jr.— 17 boys, 5 girls; Prince George's, Bladensburg Sr.— 72 boys, 108 girls. 



Maryland State Department of Education 221 



iy Public High School : Fall of 1955 





•ench 




Spanish 


Ag 
cult 


ri- 

ure 


Industri 


alt 


Home 
Econom 


ICS 


Bus 
Sub 








Art-Arts 
and Crafts 




* 

Gen. 


t 

Voc. 


A 


rts 


°a 
Edu. 


G 


en. 


b 

Voc. 


ness 
ects 


Educ 


ation 








B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 




274 


285 


596 


412 


28 


146 


5,431 


715 


1,202 


10 


5,446 


914 


866 


2,266 


8,065 


7,379 


5,012 


5,433 


4,37S 


4,135 




23 


33 


131 


68 






190 


6 


1,013 






306 


38 


255 


516 


344 


83 


109 


112 


91 




14 


13 


53 


44 






156 








95 


48 


121 


152 


202 


134 


55 


86 


17 


23 




56 


73 


180 


98 






348 


'6 






38 


200 


109 


492 


513 


475 


164 


201 


51 


66 




59 


53 


86 


38 








703 






562 


106 


98 


275 


831 


762 


415 


531 


444 


417 








22 


22 




48 


li9 








143 




85 


93 


223 


210 


97 


117 


103 


113 








31 


49 




59 


218 








98 


9i 


2 


31 


304 


235 


206 


226 


173 


197 




29 


22 


62 


38 






426 








218 


127 


202 


523 


499 


452 


125 


399 


199 


113 




! 43 


47 










145 








140 




59 


60 


285 


242 


197 


202 


145 


112 




1 37 


31 


21 


i5 






202 








177 


20 


51 


110 


245 


179 


189 


188 








1 13 


13 








39 


89 








77 




40 


75 


25'! 


23^ 


139 


127 


lio 


lio 








io 


40 






291 




189 


io 


352 


ie 


61 


200 


491 


533 


408 


406 


406 


422 












•• 




570 








563 








570 


563 


399 


405 


385 


376 
















571 








512 








571 


512 


571 


512 


536 


504 
















268 








256 








268 


256 


243 


238 




















368 








635 








592 


594 


469 


451 


416 


398 
















373 








377 








392 


393 


266 


237 


334 


325 
















401 








341 








412 


347 


252 


269 


316 


193 
















361 








373 








342 


358 


280 


307 


251 


257 
















255 








396 








397 


396 


296 


273 


243 


270 
















80 








93 








80 


93 


80 


82 


60 


81 
































78 


67 


78 


67 


78 


67 




31 


64 


21 


27 




180 


53C 








412 


122 


83 


245 


668 


616 


365 


369 


53 


43 




1 6 


23 








44 


147 








132 




32 


116 


147 


165 


17 


24 






12 


13 


21 


27 




70 


166 








79 


84 


18 


54 


241 


187 


143 


134 


53 


43 




5 


22 








66 


134 








108 


38 


2 


25 


181 


164 


181 


164 






8 


6 










83 








93 




31 


50 


99 


100 


24 


47 








21 


11 






36 


133 


61 








460 


62 


124 


283 


710 


673 


415 


415 


142 


156 










36 


78 










56 


62 


16 


56 


166 


176 


154 


160 




10 


6 


















73 




33 


23 


92 


76 


77 


66 
















55 










1 lU 




29 


74 


163 


159 


107 


106 






ii 


5 


















171 




46 


130 


212 


179 






126 


123 














ei 








50 








77 


83 


77 


83 


16 


33 


14 


26 






70 


31 


267 








528 




118 


177 


749 


732 


513 


486 


37 


43 


11 


20 






28 


31 










93 




25 


50 


170 


171 








3 


6 






















24 


36 


48 


69 


21 


31 


















109 








86 








109 


86 


91 


93 


























187 




69 


9i 


195 


190 


194 


187 






































29 


26 


29 


26 










42 




158 








162 








227 


216 


170 


132 




































8 


17 


8 


i7 


58 


55 








107 


481 








501 




111 


193 


572 


641 


472 


544 


58 


68 


31 


28 








62 


236 








240 




85 


107 


291 


341 


175 


225 




23 


20 








45 


144 








170 




5 


44 


178 


209 


232 


236 






4 


7 










101 








91 




21 


42 


103 


91 


65 


83 


58 


68 


108 


133 


62 


101 


40 


264 


2 ,439 


1 


221 




2 ,146 


207 


220 


745 


2 ,952 


2 ,571 


2 ,312 


2 ,491 


1 ,067 
109 


1 053 
66 


61 


63 


62 


101 




54 


332 




221 




185 


66 


45 


374 


447 


304 


201 


331 


6 


10 








68 


161 








145 




39 


93 


252 


193 


186 


166 






8 


10 










124 








106 




88 


131 


252 


229 


191 


186 


li7 


li2 


9 


16 










143 








80 


si 


26 


24 


160 


164 


141 


171 


39 




15 








93 


324 








263 


77 


17 


73 


387 


234 


327 


345 




1 1 8 


14 






17 


49 


85 








90 


33 


2 


25 


161 


176 


130 


183 
















23 




23 








63 








46 


63 


46 


63 








2 


5 










77 


1 






64 




3 


25 


77 


64 


77 


64 


32 


30 
















402 








397 








402 


397 


402 


397 


370 


373 
















456 








398 








456 


398 


386 


323 


235 


205 
















312 








349 








312 


349 


225 


262 


204 


228 


■ 30 


43 








181 


1,015 








961 




353 


401 


1,269 


1,134 


974 


96^ 


759 


842 
46 


■ 16 


28 








50 


121 








53 




258 


259 


111 


49 


69 


70 


36 


■ 10 


9 








32 


72 








79 




26 


31 


105 


76 


52 


66 




■1 4 


6 










54 








50 




19 


27 


72 


77 




84 


66 












73 


333 








349 




50 


84 


397 


335 


341 


320 


181 


202 












26 


435 








430 








569 


580 


497 


494 


443 


511 






























15 


17 


15 


17 


15 


17 


I 15 


23 


24 


47 


38 


147 


633 








604 


41 


250 


240 


887 


768 


772 


718 


93 


45^ 








11 


17 






121 








98 




47 


38 


144 


122 


146 


133 














42 


117 








138 




56 


67 


137 


149 


119 


134 








15 


23 


i3 


30 




53 


206 








186 




104 


1% 


265 


232 


157 


174 


73 


39' 
& 












38 


52 


189 






■■| 


182 


41 


43 


35 


341 


265 


350 


277 


20j 



In des the following number of boys and girls taking Distributive Education: Allegany, Allegany Sr.-Jr. — 22 
s; . ntgomery, Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr. — 16 boys, 14 girls; Montgomery Blair Sr. — 18 boys, 10 girls; Wheaton 
Jr.- i boys, 4 girls; Washington, Hagerstown Sr. — 6 boys, 22 girls. 

In des the following number of girls taking Industrial Education: Baltimore, Kenwood Sr. — 11; Montgomery, 
Ter . — 64; Montgomery Blair Sr. — 35; Wheaton Sr.-Jr. — 40; Prince George's, Fairmount Heights Sr.-Jr. — 34. 
In ies the following number of boys taking Vocational Home Economics: Howard, Harriet Tubman Sr.-Jr. — 1. 



INDEX 



A 

Academic , course, each high school, 210-215 
Accreditation and certification, 29-37 
Administration 

Cost per pupil, 131 

Expenditures, 200 

Per cent for, 128 

Superintendents, 2, 5-13, 193, 200 
Adult education, 142, 144-145, 203 
Agriculture 

Adult education, 141, 144-146 

Enrollment, 95, 102 

Each high school, 216-221 

Federal aid, 141-144 

Schools offering, 96, 216-221 

State supervision, 2 

Teachers, 96 
Aid from State and or Federal funds 

Counties and Baltimore City, distribution by 
type of fund, 126-127, 179, 195, 196-197 

State teachers colleges, 167-168, 179, 181 

Vocational education, 141-142, 144, 179, 197 

Vocational rehabilitation, 175, 179 
Appropriations 

County, 126-127, 156, 179, 198 

State, 126-127, 179, 198 
Art, high school 

Enrollment, 95, 103 

Each high school, 216-221 

Schools offering, 96, 216-221 

Teachers, 96 
Assessable basis, 157-159 
Attendance 

Average daily, 194 

Each high school, 210-215 

Per cent of, 195 

Summer school pupils, 172 

Teachers at summ»er school, 108 

Workers (see Pupil personnel) 
Atypical children, 68-75 

Auxiliary agencies (see Other school services) 



B 

Bands, orchestras, glee clubs, 106 
Basic aid per classroom unit, 179, 196 
Belonging, average number, 194 

Each high school, 210-215 

Per teacher, 80-81 
Birth rates, 76-78 

Board of Education, State, 2, 179-180 
Boards of Education, County, 5-13 
Bonds outstanding, school, 152 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per pupil 

Elementary, 133 

High, 134 
Expenditures 

All schools, 201, 207 

Elementary, 208 

High, 209 

Per cent of current expense budget, 128 
Boys and girls 
Enrollment 

Nonpublic, 186-191 
PubHc, 185 
Graduates, high school, 88-94, 210-215 
Budget(s) 

Baltimore City, county, local, 126-127, 156 

State public school, 179 

State teachers colleges, 179, 181 
Buildings 

Cost (see Capital outlay) 

Number of, 123, 124, 184 

Value of school, per pupil, 154 
Business education 

Adult, 145-147 

Enrollment, 95, 104, 142-143, 145, 147 

Each high school, 216-221 
Schools offering, 96, 216-221 
Teachers, 96 



Capital outlay, school. 126, 128 

By site, building, equipment, 206 
Certificate status, teacher, 118-119 
Certificates held by county teachers, 109-111, 

118-119 

Certification and accreditation, 29-37 
Classes 

Evening school, 145-147 

Size of, 80-81 

Special for handicapped, 68-75 
Summer school, Baltimore City, 172 
Clerks, county schools, 193 
Colleges 

High school graduates 

of 1955 entering, 90-94 
of 1956 entering State teachers colleeea 
89, 210-215 ^ ' 

Junior, 162, 165-166 

State teachers, 5, 160-165, 167-168. 179 
181-183 

Training teachers appointed in Maryland 
counties, 107 
Commercial (see Business education) 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 121 

Transportation of pupils, 138-139 
Construction accounts. State teachers colleges 

182-183 ^ ' 

Core program, high school 

Enrollment, 95 

Each high school, 216-221 

Schools offering, 96, 216-221 

Teachers, 96 
Cost per pupil 

Administration, 131 

Analyzed for elementary and high, 132-134 
By type of school, 131 
Transported, 138-139 
Costs (see Expenditures) 

County superintendents, directors, supervisors, 5-13 
Courses in individual high schools, 210-215 
Crippled children, services for, 68-75 
Current expenses 

Cost per pupil, 129-134 
Expenditures 

All schools, 199 

By source of fundr 126-127 
By type of school, 207-209 



D 

Dates, opening and closing of schools, 66 

Days in session, 66 

Debt service, 153, 156, 205 

Tax rate for, 155 
Disbursements (see Expenditures) 
Distributive education, 141-143 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 105 

Schools offering, 96 

Teachers, 96 

E 

Elementary schools, supervision, 125, 193 
Emergency certificates, 109-111 
Employment of high school graduates, 90-94 
English, high school 

Enrollment, 95, 97 

Each high school, 216-221 

Schools offering, 96, 216-221 

Teachers, 96 
Enrollment 

Adult, 145, 147 

Atypical children, 68-75 

Elementary, 66-67, 82-84, 185-191 

Grade or year, 82-84 

High school 

Course, each school, 210-215 
Growth in, 135 



222 



Index 



223 



E — (Continued) 

Subjects, 95, 97-106 

Each school, 216-221 
Year, 82-84 

Each school, 210-215 
Increase in, 67 

Nonpublic, private and parochial, 66-67, 
186-191 

Number different pupils, 67, 185 
Public, 66-67, 82-84, 185 
State teachers colleges, 162-165 
Subjects, 95, 97-106 

Each school, 216-221 
Summary, 66-67 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 172 
Equalization fund, 127, 196 
Equivalence examinations, 173 
Evening schools and courses 
Enrollment, 145, 147 
Expenditures, 141-142, 144, 203 
Expenditures, 188-209 

(see also Administration, Instruction, Opera- 
tion, Maintenance, Fixed charges. Other 
school services. Payments to adjoining 
counties, Current expenses, Debt service. 
Capital outlay) 
Elementary schools, 208 
Evening schools, 141-142, 144, 203 
Health, 203 
High schools, 209 
Libraries, 201 
Rehabilitation, 175, 180 
Salaries 

All schools, 201, 207 
Elementary, 208 
High, 135, 209 
Vocational, 141-144 
State teachers colleges, 167-168, 179, 181 
Total, by major classifications, 179, 199 
Transportation, 164-165, 203 
Vocational, Federal, 141-144, 197 

F 

Failures (see Nonpromotions) 
FaU enrollment, 66, 82-84 
Federal aid 

Vocational education, 141-147, 179, 197 
Administration and supervision, 141 
Salaries of teachers, 141-144 
Fees in State teachers colleges, 167-168, 179, 181 
Financial statements 

State public schools, 179, 195-209 

State teachers coL'-^ges, 179, 181-183 
First grade nonpromotions, 87 
Fixed charges, 128, 204 
French, high school 

Enrollment, 95, 101 

Each high school, 216-221 

Schools offering, 96, 216-221 

Teachers, 96 

G 

Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, 106 
Grade enrollment, 82-84 
Graduates 

High school, 88-94 

Entering State teachers colleges, 89, 91-93, 

210-215 
From each school, 210-215 
Occupations of, 90-94 
State teachers colleges, 160-161 
Guidance, teachers of, 96 

H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 68-69, 179 
Home instruction, 68-69, 71, 185 
Hospital schools, 68-69, 71, 185 
Institutions for, 68-69, 71, 75 
Opportunities for education of, 68-75 
Receipts from State for, 68-69, 179, 196 
Transportation of, 69 



H — (Continued) 

Health expenditures, all schools, 203 
Hearing, conservation of, 68, 73-74 
High school equivalence examinations, 173 
High schools 

Disbursements, 209 

Individual, 210-215, 216-221 

Supervision, 125, 193 
Home economics 

Adult, 141-142, 145-147 

Enrollment, 95, 102 

Each high school, 216-221 

Federal aid, 141-144 

Schools offering, 96, 216-221 

Teachers, 96 
Home instruction of pupils, 68-69, 71, 185 
Hospital instruction of pupils, 68-69, 71, 185 

I 

Incorporated towns, levy for, 156 
Industrial arts (see Trades and industries) 
Instruction, division of, 38-51 
Cost per pupil, 132-134 
Expenditures, 207-209 

Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 201 
State teachers colleges, 167-168 
Per Cent of current expense budget, 128 
Inventories, State teachers colleges, 169 

J 

Janitors, repair, utility men, 193 
Junior colleges, 163, 165-166 

K 

Kindergartens, 82, 84 
Nonpublic, 186-191 

L 

Languages (see English, French, etc.) 

Latin (see French) 

Legislation, 16-17 

Length of session, 66 

Letter of transmittal, 15 

Levies, county, 156 

Librarians, county, 5 

Libraries 

Expenditures, 177-178, 201 

Public, 5, 177 

School, 178 
Library extension, 52-58, 176-178 
Lip reading classes, 73-74, 147 
Lunch program, school, 148-149, 197, 203 

M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil, 132-134 

Expenditures, 202, 207-209 

Per cent of current expense budget, 128 
Materials of instruction (see Books and instruc- 
tional materials) 
Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 95, 100 

Each high school, 216-221 

Schools offering, 96, 216-221 

Teachers, 96 
Medical examinations, 196 
Men teachers, 122, 192 

Mentally handicapped children, 68-72, 74-75 
Milk program, school, 150, 197, 203 
Minimum program, State, 195 
Minutes, State Board, 18-28 
Music, high school 

Enrollment, 95, 103 

Each high school, 216-221 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 106 

Schools offering, 96, 216-221 

Teachers, 96 

N 

Night schools (see Evening schools. Adult educa- 
tion) 



224 



Index 



N— (Continued) 

Non promotions 

Elementary, 86-87 

First grade, 87 

High school, 85 
Number belonging, 194 

Each high school, 210-215 

Per teacher, 80-81 
Number different pupils, 67, 185 
Number of schools 

For atypical children, 68-75 

Having one teacher, 120-121, 184 

Nonpublic, 66, 186-191 

Public, 66, 184 

Elementary, 120-121, 123-124, 184 
High, 123-124, 184 

o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 90-94 
One-teacher schools 

Decrease in, 121 

Number belonging in, 120 

Number of, 120, 184 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 132-134 

Expenditures, 202, 207-209 

Per cent of current expense budget, 128 
Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 106 
Other school services 

Cost per pupil, 132-134 

Expenditures, 203, 207-209 

Per cent of current expense budget, 128 

P 

Parent-teacher associations, 171 

Parochial and private schools, 66-67, 186-191 

Part-payment of salaries, 196 

Payments to adjoining counties, 128, 204 

Pensions (see Retirement system for teachers) 

Physical education and health, 203 

Physical education and recreation, high school 

Appropriations for, 179 

Enrollment, 95, 103 

Each high school, 216-221 

Schools offering, 96, 216-221 

Teachers, 96 

Physical examinations (see Medical examinations) 
Physically handicapped children, 68-75 
Preparation, teachers, 112 
Presidents of State teachers colleges, 5 
Professional and clerical staffs, county, 193 
Private and parochial schools, 66-67, 186-191 
Property, valuation of 

Counties and Baltimore City, 158-159 

School, 154 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel, 5-13 

Supervisors of, 125, 193 
Salaries, 203 

Pupils 

Atypical, 68-75 
Nonpublic, 66-67, 186-191 
One-teacher schools, 120-121 
Per teacher, 80-81 
PubHc school 

Enrollment, 66-67, 185 

Number attending, 194 

Number belonging, 194 

Per cent of attendance, 194 
Transported, 138-139 

R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 198 

Federal government, 197 
Evening schools, 144 
Teachers' salaries, 141-144 
Vocational education, 141-144 

State, 196 

Distributed by type of fund, 126, 179, 196 

Evening schools, 144 

Total and per cent, 126 

Teachers colleges, 167-168, 179, 181 



R — (Continued) 

Rehabilitation, vo-'ational, 3-4, 64-65, 174-175 
179-180 

Repair, utility men, janitors, 193 
Resignations, teachers, 113 
Retarded children, programs for, 68-75 
Retirement system for teachers, 4, 170, 179 

S 

Salaries 

Growth of high school, 135 
Per cent of school budget, 128 
Superintendents', 200 
Supervisors', 201 

Pupil personnel, 203 
Teachers' 

Average per teacher, 136-137 
Cost per pupil, 132-134 
Total 

Elementary, 208 
High, 135, 209 
Vocational, 141-144 
School lunch program, 148-149, 197, 203 
School milk program, 150, 197, 203 
Schools 

For atypical children, 75 
Number of, 66, 120-121, 123-124, 184, 186-19 
Science, high school 

Enrollment, 95, 99 

Each high school, 216-221 
Schools offering, 96, 216-221 
Teachers, 96 
Session, length of, 66 
Sex of teachers, 122, 192 
Sight conservation classes, 74 
Size of 

Classes, 80-81 
Schools 

Each high school, 210-215 
Elementary, 120-121, 123-124 
High, 123-124 
Teaching staff, 66, 120-121, 192 
Social studies, high school 
Enrollment, 95, 98 

Each high school, 216-221 
Schools offering, 96, 216-221 
Teachers, 96 
Spanish (see French) 
Special classes for handicapped, 68-75 
Special high school teachers, 96 
State 

Aid to schools, 126-127 

Minimum program, 195 
Showing various funds, 179, 196 

Board of Education, 2, 179 

Excerpts from minutes of, 18-28 

Department of Education, 2-4 

Public school budget, 179-181 

Teachers colleges, 5, 89, 91-93, 160-165, 
167-168, 179, 210-215 

Teachers' retirement system, 4, 170, 179 
Stenography, typing, bookkeeping (see Businei 

education) 
Subjects studied in high schools, 95-106 

Each high school, 216-221 
Summer school attendance 

County teachers, 108 

Pupils, Baltimore City, 172 
Superintendents, 2, 5-13, 193 
Supervisors, supervision 

Cost per pupil, 132-134 

Cost, salaries, expenses, 201 
By type of school, 207-209 

Names of, 2-1, 5-13 

Number of, 125, 193 

Per cent of current expense budget, 128 

Salaries of, 201, 207-209 

State, 2-4 

T 

Taxable basis, 157-159 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 128 

Tax rates, county, 155 



Index 



225 



T— (Continued) 

Teacher(s) 

Academic, high school, 96 

Average salary, 136-137 

Certificate status, 118-119 

Certification, 29-37, 109-111 

CoUeges, 5, 89, 91-93, 160-165, 167-168, 179, 

181, 210-215 
Growth in number, 135 
Number of, 192 

For each high school subject, 96 
In each high school, 210-215 
In schools of each type 
Atypical, 74 
Nonpublic, 66, 186-191 
Public, 66, 192 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 172 
Of atypical children, 68-75 
Preparation, 112 
Pupils per, 80-81 
Resignations, 113 
Salaries 

Average, 136-137 

Growth in high school, 135 
Sex of, 122, 192 

Special subjects, high school, 96 

Summary, elementary and high, public and 

nonpublic, 66 
Summer school attendance, 108 
Training institutions, 160-165, 167-168, 179, 

181 

Turnover of, 113-117 
Teachers' retirement system 

Financial statements, 170, 179 
Staff, 4 

Teachers' contributions to, 170 
Trades and industries (Industrial arts) 
Adult, 141-142, 145, 147 



T— (Continued) 

Enrollment, 96, 102, 143 

Each high school, 216-221 
Federal aid, 141-144 
Schools offering, 96, 216-221 
Teachers, 96 

Training centers, State teachers colleges, 162-164 
Transmittal, letter of, 15 
Transportation of pupils, 138-139, 203 

Cost, total and per pupil, 138-139, 203 

Per cent transported, 138-139 

Handicapped, 69 
Tuition charges. State teachers colleges, 167 
Turnover in teaching staff, 113-117 

V 

Value of 

Assessable property, 157-159 

School property, 154 
Vocational education, 141-147, 179, 197 

Division of, 59-62 

Enrollment 

Day schools, 95, 102, 143, 216-221 
Evening schools, 144-147 

Federal aid, 141-143, 179, 197 

State aid, 179 
Vocational rehabilitation, 3-4, 63-65, 174-175, 

179-180 

w 

Wealth back of each pupil, 157 
Withdrawals of pupils, 79 
Withdrawals of teachers, 113 



Y 

Year, length of session, 66 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
NINETY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 

Of The 

State Board of Education 

Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

Year Ending . 




' TMORF 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



NINETY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 

Of The 

State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 
Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 
Year Ending June 30, 1957 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



MARYLAND DIRECTORY 



SCHOOL OFFICIALS, OCTOBER 1956 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Name Address Term Expires 

Wendell D. Allen, President Baltimore 1963 

Jerome Framptom, Jr., Vice-president Federalsburg 1957 

Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole Chevy Chase 1962 

William A. Gunter Cumberland 1960 

Dwight O. W. Holmes Baltimore 1958 

Mrs. Richard Marcus Pikesville 1959 

George C. Rhoderick Middletown 1961 

Thomas G. PuUen, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer 

MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 

Na me Office 

Thomas G. PuUen, Jr State Superintendent of Schools 

John J. Seidel Assistant State Superintendent 

David W. Zimmerman Assistant State Superintendent 

James E. Spitznas Director of Instruction 

W. Theodore Boston Director of Certification and Accreditation 

Helen M. Clark Director of Library Extension 

William S. Sartorius Director of Administration and Finance 

R. C. Thompson Director of Vocational Rehabilitation 

E. Drusilla Chairs Stenographer-Secretary 

Dorothy E. Young Stenographer-Secretary 

Division of Instruction — James E. Spitznas, Director 

Willis H. White Assistant Director 

George M. Crawford Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Gladys T. Hopkins Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Grace A. Dorsey Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Paul E. Huffington Supervisor of High Schools 

Sarah L. Leiter Supervisor of Instruction 

Herbert R. Steiner Supervisor of Physical Education 

Dorothy W. Shires Supervisor of Pupil Personnel and Parent Education 

Mrs. Geneva E. Flickinger Supervisor of Special Education 

Thomas W. Pyles Supervisor of Special Education 

Beverly J. Sheain ^ Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Beverly Armiger ' Senior Stenographer 

Mildred M. Faulstich " Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Constance Fish Senior Stenographer 

Sue E. Stimely (part time) Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Helen M. McFadden Senior Typist 

Division of Vocational Education — John J. Seidel, Assistant Superintendent 

Harry M. McDonald Supervisor of Agriculture 

Dwight P. Jacobus Supervisor of Educational Services to Industry 

Evelyn F. Miller Supervisor of Home Economics 

Herschel M. James Supervisor of Industrial Education 

Frank H. Nachman » Counselor for Veterans On-the-Job Training Program 

Elizabeth McGinnity Stenographer-Secretary 

Lillian O. Erpenstein Senior Stenographer 

Sue E. Stimely (part time) Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Hazel B. Wilkerson . . . . / Senior Stenographer 

Florence M. Brady Junior Clerk 

Division of Certification and Accreditation — W. Theodore Boston, Director 

James L. Reid Assistant Director and Supervisor of School Plant Planning 

*F. J. Thuman Consultant Architect 

M. Eleanor Rice Supervisor of Certification 

Helen L. Widmyer Supervisor of Accreditation 

C. William Anthony Supervisor of Teacher Education 

Harold D. Reese Supervisor of Teacher and Higher Education 

p]leanor G. Weagly Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

George A. Myers ^ Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Ruth E. Hobbs Assistant Supervisor of Equivalence Examinations 

Charles C. Conlon Assistant Supervisor of Trade Schools 

Richard K. McKay Assistant Supervisor of Trade Schools 

Mrs. Grace Steele Travers Counselor 

Helen P]lli3 Stenographer-Secretary 

E\H\e F. Forman Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Florence B. Ackerman Senior Slenogra[)her 

Alice Algie Senior Stenographer 

Angela M. O'Neill Senior Stenographer 

* Part time 



Name Office 

Mrs. Bessie S. Price Senior Stenographer 

Bessie L. Rones Senior Stenographer 

Vacancy Senior Stenographer 

Vacancy Senior Stenograoher 

Mrs. Gertrude A. Gorrell Senior Clerk 

Lee F. Kolman Senior Clerk 

Augusta Schoberg Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Hanna Zusman Senior Clerk 

Division of Library Extension — Helen M. Clark, Director 

400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore 1 

Mae Graham Supervisor of School and Children's Libraries 

Nettie B. Taylor Supervisor of County and Institutional Libraries 

Eleanor Hocker Reader's Counselor 

Harry E. Foster Technical Counselor 

M. E. Naomi Johnson Associate Librarian 

Josephine M. Baldwin Assistant Librarian 

Mrs. Suzanne Pearce Assistant Librarian 

Mrs. Beverly B. Green Library Assistant 

Doris L. Anderson Stenographer-Secretary 

Martha Keydash Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Gloria Frankowski Senior Typist 

Mrs. Mildred M. Johnston Senior Clerk 

I ouise Thomas Junior Typist 

Aydelotte L. Meister Junior Clerk 

Louis Myers Porter 

Division of Administration and Finance — WiLLL4M S. Sartorius, Director 

William L. Barall Supervisor of Finance 

R. Christine Hogan Supervisor of Research 

Howard E. Bosley Supervisor of Teachers College Business Management 

Charles V. Akeley Assistant Supervisor in Finance 

Bernard G. Geyer Assistant Supervisor in Finance 

Mrs. Anne K. Carroll Assistant Supervisor in Research 

Helen D. George Editor 

Jesse C. Gawthrop Auditor 

Margaret E. Albaugh Administrative Assistant 

Mrs. Genevieve Nekervis Statistician I 

Mrs. Mary McN. Faupel Statistician II 

Mrs. Verda McCIow Statistician II 

Mrs. Mary E. Hoover Principal Account Clerk I 

Margaret F. Flahavan Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Laura Gaither Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Mary B. Prince Principal Account Clerk II 

Phyllis E. Rodgers Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Ruth S. Friedland Stenographer-Secretary 

Carrye Hamburger Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Bessie R. Gale Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Corinne D. Combs Report Typist 

Mrs. Virginia K. Goldsmith Statistical Clerk 

Mrs. Ellen C. Gordon Senior Typist 

Mrs. Margaret P. Rappe Senior Typist 

Mrs. Ruth V. Meyer Tabulating Equipment Operator 

Mrs. Marie WoUschlager Key Punch Operator 

Mrs. Wilda R. Taylor. Telephone Operator 

Lloyd E. Holmes Office Appliance Operator 

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation — R. C. Thompson, Director 

W. Bird Terwilliger Assistant Director 

Lionel Burgess Supervisor of Case Services 

George W. Keller Assistant Supervisor of Services for the Blind 

*Francis J. Borges Medical Consultant 

Myrtle E. Chell Special Counselor for the Tuberculous 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Swisher Special Counselor for the Tuberculous 

John T. Goembel Craft Specialist 

Vacancy Craft Specialist 

Kathleen E. Scheve Stenographer-Secretary 

Anne Nusinov Principal Stenographer 

Charlotte A. Sylvester Principal Stenographer 

Joan Walterhoefer Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Joan A. DeWicki Senior Stenographer 

METROPOLITAN BALTIMORE OFFICE 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 

Thomas D. Braun Supervisor 

J. Leo Delaney Assistant Supervisor 

Ernest C. AUnutt, Jr Counselor 

James S. Dashiell Counselor 

Margaret W. Harris Counselor 



Part time 



METROPOLITAN BALTIMORE OFFICE (Cont'd) 

Name Office 

Martha R. Harrison Counselor 

Harold B. Hayes Counselor 

William W. Lamprell Counselor 

William B. Melville Counselor 

Ruth F. Ring Counselor 

James D. Smyth Counselor 

Carroll L. Speck Counselor 

M. Eugene Spurrier Counselor 

Emma Lueckert Stenographer-Secretary 

Lillian Fox Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Helen M. Gordon Senior Stenographer 

Audrey M. Hammel Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Nancy H. Maslanka Senior Stenographer 

June F. Roemer Senior Stenographer 

Bell Sklar Senior Stenographer 

Vacancy Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Olive M. Mayo Receptionist 

EASTERN SHORE DISTRICT 
117 Calvert Building, Salisbury 

Raymond H. Simmons Assistant Supervisor 

Robert L. Burton Counselor 

1 — Frank A. Tarbutton Counselor 

Mrs. Anne E. Bishop Senior Stenographer 

1 — Board of Education, Chestertown 

SOUTHERN MARYLAND DISTRICT 
4313 Hamilton Street, Hyattsville 

Merl D. Myers Assistant Supervisor 

Leslie B. Cole Counselor 

1 — Fedon G. Nides Counselor 

2 — Loren Rice Counselor 

3 — Carroll Walsh Counselor 

3 — F. dePaul Whitehurst Counselor 

3 — Marian C. Johnson Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Dolores Ann Kissell Senior Stenographer 

1 — Board of Education, Annapolis 

2 — Board of Education, La Plata 

3 — Board of Education, Rockville 

WESTERN MARYLAND DISTRICT 
74 West Washington Street, Hagerstown 

H. Dorsey Devlin Assistant Supervisor 

Howard B. Dean Counselor 

Bernard F. Kelly Counselor 

1— John M. Cobun Counselor 

2— William C. Hill . Counselor 

Mrs. Alfreda E. CoflFman Senior Stenographer 

1 — 111 Union Street, Cumberland 

2— 115 East Church Street, Frederick 

DISABILITY DETERMINATIONS PROGRAM 

(Old Age and Survivors' Insurance) 
10 East Fayette Street, Baltimore 2 

Foy L. Lunsford Assistant Supervisor 

Minnie Gerber Junior Counselor 

Mrs. Martha C. Trate Junior Counselor 

*S. J. Venahle, M. D Medical Consultant 

Jane E. Gallagher , Senior Stenographer 

Gloria M. Godsey Senior Stenographer 

MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND OFFICE STAFF 
31 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Hooper S. Miles, Chairman State Treasurer 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Vice-chairman State Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary S. Ellis Principal, North Salisbury Elementary School, Wicomico County 

J. Millard Tawes State Comptroller 

Willis H. White Asst. Director, Division of Instruction, State Department of Education 

John P. Mannion Director 

C. G. Christis Accountant 

Minnie M. Hamilton Administrative Assistant II 

Mrs. Dorothy Bitterman Atlee Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Aneta Richardson Accounting Machine Oiicrator 

Mrs Edna Doyle Accounting Machine Operator 

Mrs! Anna M. Novak Senior Typist 

Mrs. Anne Gill Senior Clerk 



* Part time 



4 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES IX MARYLAND 



County Library Librarian 

Allegany Cumberland Free Public Library Mary G. Walsh 

La Vale Public Library Mrs. Milton Granet 

Westernport Public Library Mrs. Elizabeth Thomas 

Frostburg Public Library Miss Thelma McKay 

Anne Arundel Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Library, 

Annapolis Esther King 

Kuethe Library, Glen Burnie Helen Zeman 

Baltimore City . Enoch Pratt Free Library Amy Winslow 

Baltimore Baltimore County Library, Towson Richard Minnich 

Caroline Denton Public Librarj' Mrs. G. Daniel Grouse 

Federalsburg Community Library Mrs. Jack Christopher 

Ridgely Community Library Mrs. Paul Hoffman 

Carroll Davis Library, "Westminster Mrs. Helen Rex Shrover 

Cecil Cecil County Library, Elkton Mrs. Dorothy W. JeTorson 

Cecilton Community Library Mrs. Alfred L. Pierce 

Charles Charles County Library, La Plata Doris Holmes 

Dorchester Dorchester County Public Library, Cambridge. . .Mrs. Margaret Henry 

Hurlock Free Public Library Mrs. Floyd X. Harper 

Vienna Public Library Mrs. Alan Webb 

Frederick C. Burr Artz Library, Frederick Josenhine Etchison 

Emmitsburg Public Library Louise Sebold 

Thurmont Public Library Mrs. Ernest Hammaker 

Garrett Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County, Oakland Edith Brock 

Harford Harford County Library, Bel Air Mrs. Dorothy Glackin 

Havre de Grace Public Library Mrs. Roswell Poplar 

Howard Howard County Library, Ellicott City Mrs. Lenna Burgess 

Kent Chestertown Public Library Cornelia Davis 

Montgomery Montgomery County Department of Public 

Libraries, Gaithersburg George B. Moreland 

Rockville Public Library Mrs. Rose C. Miller 

Takoma Park Public Library Mrs. Ruth B. Pratt 

Prince George's . Prince George's County Memorial Library, 

Hyattsville Mrs. Mary Kenan Hadley 

Greenbelt Public Library Mrs. Marjorie A. Muir 

Queen Anne's Queen Anne's County Library, Centreville Mrs. Elizabeth H. Baker 

St. Marj-'s St. Mary's County Memorial Library, 

Leonardtown Gladys Long, .Acting 

Somerset Corbin Memorial Library, Crisfield Mrs. Gladys Daugherty 

Princess Anne Public Library Mrs. S. Russell Bozman 

Vaughn Hoffman Memorial Library, Rhodes Point Mrs. Doris Spriggs 

Talbot Talbot County Free Library, Easton Mrs. David S. Stewart 

Washington Washington County Free Library, Hagerstown. .Mrs. Mary Louise Holzafel 

Wicomico Wicomico County Free Library, Salisbury Mrs. Fred Horsley, Jr. 

Worcester Berlin Public f ibrary Mary Bailey 

Pocomoke City Public Library Mrs. Byron H. OUendike 

Snow Hill Public Library Mrs. Paul C. Kenney 

PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

Earle T. Hawkins Towson William E. Henry Bowie 

R. Bowen Hardesty Frostburg Parlett L. Moore Coppin, Baltimore-17 

Wilbur Devilbiss Salisbury 



COUNTY ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY STAFFS 



ALLEGANY COUNTY 

108 Washington Street, Cumbsrland 

Name Office 

Ralph R. Webster Superintendent of Schools 

Richard T. Rizer Supervisor of Secondary Education and Assistant Superintendent 

Lewyn C. Davis Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Robert E. Pence Supervisor of Physical Education 

Arthur G. Ramey Supervisor of Transportation 

Winifred Greene Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mildred E. Willison Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Elizabeth I. Flake Supervisor of Elementary Education 

W. \ algene Routch Supervisor of Music Education 

Julius D. Lonnholm Supervisor of Vocational, Industrial, and Adult Education 

Theodore P. Foote Supervisor of Art Education 

Ruth C. McColly Supervisor of Home Economics 

M. Jean Camper Supervisor of Special Education 

Joseph T. Downey Supervisor of Maintenance 

Gladys Miller Eaton Supervisor of" Cafeterias 

Homer S. Higgins Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Esther M. Carter Visiting Teacher 

Frederick H. Sheeley Visiting Teacher 

Eugene J. Hopkins Visiting Teacher 

Elizabeth Dixon Pitcher Financial Secretary and Office Manager 

Maybelle V. Nine Secretary to Superintendent 



5 



ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 
Green Street, Annapolis 



Name ^Wice 

David S. Jenkins Superintendent of Schools 

Fred L. Alexander A '.uiinistrative Assistant 

Mrs. Alice Torovsky Secretary to the Superintendent 

R Harold McCann Assistant Superintendent — Administration 

Frank C. Gunderloy. . . . Director of Construction 

Richard D. Carlson Supervisor of Planning 

Mrs. Madolyn R. Powers Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Dennis W. Turner Supervisor of Maintenance 

Frank G Baker Jr. Supervisor of Transportation 

Leonard Johnson . .' Supervisor of Custodial Service 

Howard A. Kinhart Assistant Superintendent — Senior High Schools 

Ruth V. Dudderar Assistant Superintendent — Elementary and Junior High Schools 

Leviah Daniel Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Winifred B. Fowler Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Sarah V. Jones Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia D. Moore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs Ruby G. Myers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Reed Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

H Elizabeth Slater Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Richard R. Clopper Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Katherine Kibler Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Dorothy Noble. Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Robert S. Shaffner Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Doris Clements Supervisor of Home Economics 

Vacancy Supervisor of Vocational and Technical Education 

Margaret A. Adams Supervisor of Music 

William J. Callaghan Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mary E. Wellham Supervisor of Art 

Mrs. Ellen T. Elliott Supervisor of Personnel Procurement 

Mrs! Eleanor B. Waring Director of Special Services for Children 

Mary E). Moss Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Ruth P. Eason Supervisor of Special Education 

Ernest C. Young School Psychologist 

Mrs. Flora Andrews V isiting Teacher 

Mrs. Louise M. Beadle Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Mary C. Brown Visiting Teacher 

Alice Gilbert Visiting Teacher 

George E. Klinkhamer Visiting Teacher 

B. Lewis Langdon Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Ruth J. McNelly Comptroller 

Mrs. Mary Franke Assistant to Comptroller 

BALTIMORE CITY 
3 East Twenty-fifth Street, Baltimore 18 

John H. Fischer Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Mrs. Margaret Healy Secretary to the Superintendent 

Edwin Stein Deputy Superintendent 

Mary A. Adams Assistant Superintendent Elementary 

Houston R. Jackson Assistant Superintendent, Staff Services 

William E. Lehr Assistant Superintendent, School Facilities 

John W. Lewis Assistant Superintendent, Business 

Thomas A. Van Sant Assistant Superintendent, Secondary, Vocational 

and Adult Education 

Harry Bard Director, Instructional Service 

Angela M. Broening Director, Publications 

Leona C. Buckwald Director, Guidance and Placement 

William j. HucksoU Director, Vocational Education 

Arthur Lichtenstein Director, Special Services for Pupils 

Walter A. Maccubbin u? Director, Personnel 

Richard Micherdzinski Director, Art Education 

Robert H. Nicholson Director, Cafeteria 

Albert G. Packard Director, Educational Testing 

Harrie M. Selznick Director, Special Education 

Emile Serposs Director, Music Education 

Geo. F. Smith, Jr Director, Supplies and Equipment 

Vernon S. Vavrina Director, Junior and Senior High Schools 

Elmon L. Vernier Director, Health and Physical Education 

Edith V. Walker Director, Elementary Education 

Carroll S. Rankin Administrative Assistant 

Leonore M. Coard Specialist 

Paul B. Stevens V. Special Assistant 

Mrs. Pauline D. Smith Assistant Supervisor, Art Education 

Leven C. Leatherbury Specialist, Art Education — Elementary 

Lillian M. MeinI Specialist, Art Education — Elementary 

Mrs. Lillian B. Reid Specialist, Art Education — P]lemenf,ary 

Mrs. Lillian R. Webb Specialist, Art Education— Elementary 

Mrs. Mildred F. Wehrle Specialist, Art Education — P]lementary 

G<;orge F. Horn Specialist, Art Education — Secondary 

L. Merle Smuck Supervisor, Audio- Visual Education 



6 



BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 

Name <^/^'" 

H Snilman Burns Supervisor, Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Dwight S Caskey Supervisor, Educational Supplies and Equipment 

C Wyatt Tiffany Assistant Supervisor, Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Sol Levin Supervisor, Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Irvin R Brose Supervisor, Educational Supplies and Equipment 

William Myers Specialist, Educational Supplies and Equipment 

O Eugene Albright Supervisor of School Accounting 

Mrs Emma G. Bright Supervisor, Elementary Education, Area D 

Mrs Rebecca E Carroll Supervisor, Elementary Education, Area B 

Jacob Epstein • ■ .Supervisor, Elementary Education, Area E 

Kathryn Heinz Supervisor, Elementary Education, Area C 

Charlotte M. Hurtt. Supervisor, Elementary Education, Area E 

Mrs Thelma D. Jackson Supervisor, Elementary Education, Area B 

Jean Kilborune Supervisor, Elementary Education, Area A 

Mrs Lilly W. Stevenson Supervisor, Elementary Education, Area D 

Josephine T. Toro Supervisor, Elementary Education, Area A 

Anna M. Williams Supervisor, Elementary Education, Area C 

Mrs. Lucia Agnello Specialist, Elementary Education, Area C 

Mrs. Ethel Brannan Specialist, Elementary Education, Area C 

Mrs. Catherine Brunner Specialist, Elementary Education, Area E 

Mrs. Margaret Ewing Specialist, Elementary Education, Area D 

Walter N. Gantt Specialist, Elementary Education, Area B 

Mrs. Katherine McD. Gross Specialist, Elementary Education, Area D 

Mrs. Lillian H. Ross Specialist, Elementary Education, Area B 

Mrs. Jennie Spjut Specialist, Elementary Education, Area A 

Sarah K. Yudlson Specialist, Elementary Education, Area E 

Mrs. Ruth Zachary Specialist, Elementary Education, Area A 

Mrs. Cleo A. Diggs Specialist, Reading 

Beulah P. Beale. . Supervisor, Handwriting 

Andrew T. Norgan Supervisor, Secondary Physical Education 

Mrs. Lillian B. Davis Supervisor, Health Education 

Ruth C. Cinsky Specialist, Elementary Physical Education 

F. Evelyn Douglass Specialist, Elementary Physical Education 

Dorothy V. Horine Specialist, Elementary Physical Education 

Eloise Thomas Specialist, Elementary Physical Education 

Leo C. Woods Specialist, Elementary Physical Education 

Helen Herman Director, Elementary Education, Area E 

Mrs. Marion G. Johnson Director, Elementary Education, Area D 

Mrs. E. Romaine Jones Director, Elementary Education, Area B 

Eleanor R. Shank Director, Elementary Education, Area A 

Laura M. Wells Director, Elementary Education, Area C 

M. Bernice Wiese Supervisor, Libraries 

Olive Mumford Specialist, Library 

Corwin H. Taylor Supervisor, Instrumental Music 

Mrs. Alice S. Beer Assistant Supervisor, Elementary Music Education 

Nelson Baker Specialist, Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Margaret A. Binns Specialist, Elementary Music Education 

Abia F. Jackson Specialist, Elementary Music Education 

M. Eleanor Moore Specialist, Elementary Music Education 

Delia v. Weber Specialist, Elementary Music Education 

Angela D. Woode Specialist, Elementary Music Education 

Don Reigier Specialist, Secondary Vocal Music f^ducation 

Ruth Richards Specialist in Personnel, Elementary 

William C. McClean. . Specialist in Personnel, Secondary and Vocational 

Edith Pruss Specialist in Personnel, Other Areas 

James H. Ely, Jr Specialist in Personnel, Classified Employees 

Walter Miller Specialist in Personnel, Records, Payrolls, Statistics 

John F. Giblette Specialist, Aptitude Testing 

Mary Jane Shapiro Specialist, Reading Analysis 

Elizabeth Armstrong Supervisor, School Social Workers 

Charles Cephas Specialist, School Social Work 

Mrs. Marjorie Everinghim Specialist, School Social Work 

Mrs. Dollie R. Walker Specialist, School Social Work 

Mrs. Eugenie Wheeler Specialist, School Social Work 

Paul Yaffe Specialist, Psychological Services 

D. C. Wharton Smith, M.D Supervisor, Medical Services 

Martha Tacka Supervisor, Secondary School Nurses 

Watson F. Pindell Specialist, Research 

Harold B. Chapman Assistant Director, Research 

Clara E. Grether Specialist, Research 

Dorothy M. Kell Supervisor, Secondary Schools (English) 

Mrs. Josie G. Smith Supervisor, Junior High Schools (English) 

Leonard Woolf Specialist, Secondary Schools (English) 

Otto K. Schmied Supervisor, Secondary Schools (Foreign Languages) 

Helen Mixter Supervisor, Secondary Schools (Geography) 

Edward L. Biller, Jr Specialist, Secondary Schools (Geography) 

Edna R. Carter Supervisor, Junior High Schools (History) 

Frank Fairbank Supervisor, Senior High Schools (History) 

Mrs. Edythe D. Myers Supervisor, Junior High Schools (History) 

Eunice Bowers Supervisor, Junior High Schools (Mathematics) 

Grover W, Norris Supervisor, senior High Schools (Mathe^natics) 

S. Leroy Taylor Supervisor, Junior High Schools (Mathematics) 



7 



BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 
Name Office 

Eira M. Palmer Supervisor, Senior Hi?h Schools (Science) 

Alexina G. Stidham Supervisor, Junior Hi^h Schools (Science) 

Sidney Blurh Specialist, Junior Jrti^h Schools (Science) 

James Francey Supervisor, Vocational Education 

James O. Proctor Supervisor, Vocational Education 

E. Duncan Hyde Supervisor, Business Education 

Nellie S. Buckey Supervisor, Home Economics 

Mrs. Virginia V. Roeder Specialist, Home Economics 

Stanley J. Paweiek Supervisor, Industrial Arts 

Mrs. Koma Stinchcomb Supervisor, Occupational and Shop Center 

Vernon H. Byus Assistant Supervisor, Vocational Equipment 

G. Edward Griefzu Supervisor, Vocational-Industrial Education 

Carl J. White Supervisor, Vocational-Industrial Education 

Wilmer V. Bell Director Designate, Adult Education 

Mrs. Katherine Whiteside-Taylor Supervisor, Parent Education 

William McK. Rawlings Supervisor, Adult Education 

Mrs. Sarah I. S. Manus Supervisor, Special Education 

Mrs. Lois T. Murray Supervisor, Special Education 

Olive A. Whildin Supervisor, Special Education 

Mrs. Gloria Basfield School Social Worker 

Prudence Bernstein School Social Worker 

Mrs. Gloria Carpenter School Social Worker 

Mary Anna Carrington School Social Worker 

Anne Chew School Social Worker 

Miriam Clark School Social Worker 

Mrs. Annie Dashiell School Social Worker 

Mrs. Betty Dykstra School Social Worker 

Mrs. Gussie Ellis School Social Worker 

Mrs. Ruth Everett School Social Worker 

Mrs. Olga Fenby School Social Worker 

Maxwell Frankford School Social Worker 

Miriam Goldberg School Social Worker 

Mrs. Delma M. Gordon School Social Worker 

Evelyn Greene School Social Worker 

Lydia GuUett School Social Worker 

Mrs. Josephine Haase School Social Worker 

Mrs. Helen Hammond School Social Worker 

Nelva O. Hobbs : . . . .School Social Worker 

Mary Moore Holmes School Social Worker 

Mrs. Harriet W. Jones School Social Worker 

Mrs. Ruth H. Lee School Social Worker 

Mrs. Rowena Lewis School Social Worker 

Rosemary MacEvoy School Social Worker 

Grace Naoko Minagawa * School Social Worker 

Norma Jean Moore ' School Social Worker 

Carolyn O. Parsons School Social Worker 

Grace Preston School Social Worker 

Sarah I. Sampson School So ial Worker 

George Seymour School Social Worker 

Mrs. Mamie Todd School Social Worker 

Mrs. Vivian Washington School Social Worker 

Kate Waters School Social Worker 

Mrs. Eva Weisman School Social Worker 

BALTIMORE COUNTY 

Aigburth Manor, Towson 4 
(1) Sollers Point High School, Sparrows Point 19 

Edward G. Stapleton Superintendent of Schools 

Homer O. Elseroad Assistant Superintendent in Administration 

James B. O'Toole, Jr Assistant Superintendent in Instruction 

William T. Willis, Jr. u?. Assistant Superintendent in Business Operations 

Morris R. Baker : . . .Engineer in Charge of Construction, Operation, and Maintenance 

G. Alfred Helwig Director of Curriculum 

B. Melvin Cole Director of Elementary Education 

Norris A. King Director of Secondary Education 

Leon E. Grant Director of Purchasing 

William J. Ellena Director of Educational Research and Planning 

Preston L. Grimm : Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent 

Helen E. Hale Supervisor of High Schools 

Joseph B. Hillyard Supervisor of Hiijh Schools 

Jean C. Sisk Supervisor of High Schools 

*Minnie H. Woolford ^> Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Wylda F. Benson " Supervisor of Junior Higii Schools 

Robert W. GifTord '. Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Samuel D. Herman Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Stella H. Johnston Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. l.ouella H. Woodward Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

M. Katherine Dost Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Clotilde Drechsler Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Myrtles. Eckhardt Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

(1) Mrs. Pauline J. Hobbs Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

*Part-time. Also serves as Principal of Carver Senior-Junior High School 



8 



BALTIMORE COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Name Office 

Jennie E. Jessop Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hilda Kestner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Anna G. Shepperd Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

OMve T. Jobes Supervisor of Art 

M. Ethel Troyer Assistant Supervisor of Art 

John W. Craft Supervisor of Music 

Thomas R. Lawrence Supervisor of Music 

Harold S. Martin Supervisor of Physical Education 

James L. Miller Supervisor of Physical Education 

Thomas M. Greene Supervisor of Business and Adult Education 

Arthur A. Dick Supervisor of Vocational Education and Industrial Arts 

Mary E. Kelleher Supervisor of Home Economics 

Ralph E. Kessler Supervisor of Special Education 

Elliott E. Lapin Supervisor of Special Education 

Anna R. Meeks Supervisor of Guidance 

N. Harry Camp, Jr Director of Clinical Services 

Curtis A. Gilgash Psychologist 

Mrs. Elizabeth L. Libo Psychologist 

Walter J. Musgrove Psychologist 

Marion H. Pel ton Psychologist 

Raymond B. Teixeira Psychologist 

Mrs. Helen W. Temmer Psychologist 

Mrs. Margaret S. Farlow Personnel and Credentials Secretary 

Allen W. Sutton Assistant in Personnel 

Helen G. Huttenhauer Assistant in Publications 

Helen C. Wachter Assistant in Testing 

Karl V. Sloop Assistant in Audio- Visual Aitfi 

Fred C. Donovan Assistant in Transportation 

C. Thomas Dunnock Assistant in Transportation 

Karl F. Swem Assistant in Transportation 

Ray H. Wingerd Assistant in Transportation 

Calvin K. Kobsa Assistant Construction Engineer 

Herd S. Eburg Supervisor of Plant Maintenance 

Herbert G. Otter Assistant in Plant Maintenance 

Ian Gordon Supervisor of Plant Operations 

H, Erich Koch Assistant in Plant Operations 

Donald E. Custer Assistant in Plant Operations 

Dale E. Lloyd Landscape Architect 

Thomas S. Bowyer Assistant in Grounds Maintenance 

Charles E. Jockel Assistant in Purchasing 

Kenneth C. Towle Assistant in Statistics and Research 

William E. Kline Supervisor of Testing 

Ruthetta Lippy Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Mrs. Adele D. Tomey Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Elizabeth D. Hodges Supervisor of Library Services 

I. Louise Ward Supervisor of Nursing Services in Secondary Schools 

Walter M. Gordon Supervisor of Transportation 

William C. Feader Supervisor of Accounting 

Herman C. Burton Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Eliza C. Merritt Visiting Teacher 

David H. Black (Ofc: Catonsville, RIdgeway 7-4169) Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Mary W. Grabel (Ofc: Rosedale, MUrdock 7-4204) Visiting Teacher 

John J. Hart Visiting Teacher 

Mildred E. Jones (Ofc: Pikesville, HUnter 6-8833) Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Irma R. Kell (Ofc: Rosedale, MUrdock 7-4204) Visiting Teacher 

Frederick R. Keyton (C:c: Rosedale, MUrdock 7-4204) Visiting Teacher 

(1) Mrs. Eliza S. McDaniel Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Vivian S. Mcintosh (Ofc: Rosedale, MUrdock 7-4204) Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Frances N. Osgood Visiting Teacher 

Helen-Louise Scarborough (Ofc: Pikesville, HUnter 6-8833) Visiting Teacher 

Mary J. Stoll (Ofc: Rosedale, MUrdock 7-4204) Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Kathryn B. Stonesifer Visiting Teacher 

Susan Summers (Ofc: Catonsville, RIdgeway 7-2329) Visiting Teacher 

Rolland \ iti (Ofc: Rosedale, MUrdock 7-4204) Visiting Teacher 

Jacqueline A. Walter (Ofc: Rosedale, MUrdock 7-4204) Visiting Teacher 

William J. Kinling Assistant in Educational Research and Planning 

Mrs. Jean W. Taylor Bookkeeper for General Budget and Special Accounts 

Mrs. Elaine B. Isennock Secretary to the Superintendent 



CALVERT COUNTY 

Prince Frederick 

Maurice A. Dunkle Superintendent of Schools 

Herman A. Hauver Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Thelma M. Cornish Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred G. Finlon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Lola M. Parks Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Lloyd J. Falk Supervisor of Maintenance 

*Richard L. Keiter Supervisor of Transportation 

Mr?. Virginia D. Parran Bookkeeper 

E. Anne Yoe Secretary to Superintendent 

*Part time. Also serves as teacher at Calvert County Sr.-Jr. High School. 



9 



CAROLINE COUNTY 
Law Building, Denton 

Name Office 

Wilbur S. Hoopengardner Superintendent of Schools 

Fred G. U§ilton Su' . rvisor of High Schools 

Beatrice Williams Supervisor of Elementary chools 

*Mrs. Lula D. Ward Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

James P. Hill , Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Bertha M. Williams Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Barbara J. Bacsak Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Clare H. KaufTman Secretary 

CARROLL COUNTY 

City Hall, Westminster 

Samuel M. Jenness Superintendent of Schools 

John F. Wooden, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Gerald E. Richter Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Margaret M. Bailer Supervisor of High Schools 

Ruth E. DeVore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Charles E. Reck Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Josephine West Supervisor of Home Economics and Cafeterias 

*Philip S. Royer Supervisor of Music 

fMae Prince Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Elizabeth Baer Supervisor of School Nurses 

Maye E. Grimes Supervisor of Puoil Personnel 

Evelyn Maus. . Visiting Teacher 

Stuart A. Widener Assistant in Building Operations and Transoortation 

Roland F. Haiflev Assistant in Custodial Service, School Lunch, and Maintenance 

Mrs. Martha S. Gilbert Secretary to the Spuerintendent 

Curvin M. Seitz Financial Secretary 

*Mrs. Nadine F. Saylor Financial Assistant 

Beverly J. Ritter Secretary to the Supervisors 

Shirley Cluck Receptionist and Stenographer 

Grace Harbaugh Stenographer 

CECIL COUNTY 
Courthouse, Elkton 

Morris W. Rannels Superintendent of Schools 

Edwin B. Fockler Supervisor of High Schools 

William C. Graham Supervisor of High Schools 

Ernest W. Snodgrass Supervisor fo High Schools 

Olive L. Reynolds Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred L. Sowers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rachel E. Boyd ; » Supervisor of Home Economics 

Edwin H. Barnes • Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

James M. Renn '. Supervisor of Maintenance and Transportation 

Mrs. Mary A. Crouse Visiting Teacher 

Willard W. Taylor Bookkeeper and Financial Secretary 

Dorothy J. Moore Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Lorris H. Clay Secretary 

Mrs. Adrienne L. Boyd Secretary 

C. R. Witworth Building Inspector 

CHARLES COUNTY 
La Plata 

C. Paul Barnhart Superintendent of Schools 

Edward C. Turner Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Brown Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Christine Pearson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Joseph C. Parks ^ Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Cecelia G. Farrall . . T' Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Georgia C. Lucas Visiting Teacher 

Margaret A. Posey Supervisor of School Lunch Program and Purchasing 

Mrs. Julia C. Totten Chief Bookkeeper and Secretary to Superintendent 

DORCHESTER COUNTY 
Court Lane, Cambridge 

James G. Busick Superintendent of Schools 

Albert S. Farver Supervisor of High Schools 

Evelyn E. Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Viola J. Comegys ^ Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

John T. Comer, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

John A. Marshall, Jr Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Mary W. LeCompte Financial Secretary 

C. Jean Spedden Secretary to Superintendent 

Wilbur Slacum Supervisor of Maintenance 

*Part time 

tPart time. Also serves as teacher in Robert Morton Sr.-Jr. High School. 

10 



FREDERICK COUNTY 
115 East Church Street, Frederick 

Name Office 

James A. Sensenbaugh Superintendent of Schools 

Duval W. Sweadner Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn S. Davis Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Louise F. Thompson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Alice M. Love Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Charles E. Henson Supervisor of Colored Schools (part time) 

Warren R. Evans Supervisor of Health and Physical Education 

Paul E. Fogle Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Doris L. Dorsey Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Virginia D. Klos Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Paul L. Hoffmaster Supervisor of Transportation 

Lewis B. Eader Supervisor of Maintenance 

Ruth R. Trout Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Pauline J. Bowlus Secretary to Superintendent 

GARRETT COUNTY 

Alder Street, Oakland 

Willard L. Hawkins Superintendent of Schools 

Foster D. Bittle Supervisor of High Schools 

Edwin W. Elias Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Caroline Wilson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

John L. Fitzwater Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Oren T. Graser Supervisor of Maintenance 

Mrs. Margaret S. McComas Financial Secretary 

Lucille Tasker Secretary to Superintendent 

HARFORD COUNTY 

45 East Gordon Street, Bel Air 

Charles W. Willis Superintendent of Schools 

Benjamin S. Carroll Assistant Superintendent 

Howard B. Peters Director of Instruction 

C. Clark Jones Director of Personnel and Public Relations 

Thomas J. Loughran Administrative Assistant 

Howard R. Cheek Administrative Assistant 

Earle B. Wagner Administrative Assistant .5 time — Supervisor .5 time 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Rowe Supervisor of High Schools 

Thomas L. Smith Supervisor of High Schools 

Violet A. Davis Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Anne M. Noonan Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hazel L. Fisher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Alfonso A. Roberty Supervisor of Purchasing 

James H. Clow, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Estelle Everett ' \ isiting Teacher 

Charles C. McCuUough \ isiting Teacher 

Ralph H. Morgan Building Engineer 

Dorothy F. Hill Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Alice W. Growl Financial Secretary 

HOWARD COUNTY 
Courthouse Annex, Ellicott City 

John E. Yingling Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary R. Hovet Supervisor of High Schools 

Frank B. Durigg Supervisor of High Schools 

Carmen C. Delaplane Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Wilhelmina E. Oldfield Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

ii.afy T. Murphy Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Gilbert E. Miller -. \ isiting Teacher 

Mrs. Irene M. Johnson Financial Secretary 

Dorothy C. Biller Secretary to Superintendent 

KENT COUNTY 

400 High Street, Chestertown 

Reade W. Corr Superintendent of Schools 

Carey E. Lacey Supervisor of High Schools 

o ^P^^P"^,- Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

<.I^. <^a"^bers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Madeleine Fennell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Clara M. Chaires Chief Clerk and Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Harriett P. Goodman Secretary 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY 
Box 231, Rockville 

^^^o'^'t^p^"'"^ Superintendent of Schools 

James 1.. t^nnce. . Asst. Superintendent in Charge of Personnel 

Mrs. Irma B Dumford Asst. to Asst. Superintendent in Charge of Personnel 

i^noma s w. fy\e Assistant Superintendent in Charge of Instruction 

**Part time. Also teaches at Garnett Senior-Junior School. 



11 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Name Office 

George L. Osterwise Director of Secondary Education 

Maxwell E. Burdette Director of Educational Services 

Arthur D. Templeton Diri^i,or of Business Affairs 

Lester J. Welch Assistant in Char!^e of Planning 

James H. Sheldon Supervisor of Construction 

George V. Menke Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds 

Mrs. Corelli David Supervisor of School Lunch 

Richard E. Ream Supervisor of Transportation 

Brian M. Benson Comptroller 

Richard B. Grove Assistant Treasurer 

H. Douglas Hall Payroll Officer 

Donald E. Deyo Dean of Montgomery Junior College 

Ethel Benson Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Sonia P. Brenner Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Anne W. Caldwell Elementary Supervisor 

Etheleen Daniel Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Agnes M. Drewry Elementary Supervisor 

William B. Evans Elementary Supervisor 

Lillian L. Gore Elementary Supervisor 

Mary L. Grau Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Ruth S. Gue Elementary Supervisor 

John M. King Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Lillian G. Klein Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Grace W. Kurtz Elementary Supervisor 

Elsie N. Schurter Elementary Supervisor 

Clara G. Stratemeyer Elementary Supervisor 

Elizabeth C. Wilson Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Marion Beckwith Secondary Supervisor 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Blew Secondary Supervisor 

Mrs. Helen P. Bready Secondary Supervisor 

William J. Fleming Secondary Supervisor 

Katherine Greaney Secondary Supervisor 

B. R. Nichols Secondary Supervisor 

Jacob Rabinovich Secondary Supervisor 

Eic'iard F. Wagner Secondary Supervisor 

Mrs. Marjorie B. St. Clair Supervisor of Art 

Mrs. Louis3 S. Walker Supervisor of Audio- Visual 

Julii Watitins Supervisor of Home Economics 

William C. Feddeman Supervisor of Industrial and Adult Education 

Leonard T. Oass Assistant Supervisor of Industrial and Adult Education 

Alice Robinson Supervisor of Libraries 

Charles T. Horn Supervisor of Music 

Chester J. Petranek Assistant Supervisor of Music 

Cresent J. Bride ^. Supervisor of Physical Education 

T. H. Owen Knight , ' Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Mirian Tannhauser ' Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Helen M. Barnes Visiting Teacher 

Reno A. Continetti Visiting Teacher 

Robert F. Fioramonti Visiung Teacher 

Jewel A. Green Visiting Teacher 

Robert C, Henley Visiting Teacher 

Weymouth H. Judkins Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Edith P. Popenoe Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Geraldine W. Reynolds Visiting Teacher 

Henry T. Shetterly ■ Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Marjorie Van Dien Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Eileen D. Wilkinson Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Dorothy W. Dawson Administrative Secretary to Superintendent 

PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY 
Upper Marlboro 

William S. Schmidt Superintendent of Schools 

George H. Robinson Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

Thomas S. Gwynn, Jr Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

Rowannotta S. Allen Director of Instruction 

Mrs. Helen H. Brashears Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Lucile L. Lurry Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Truman S. Klein Supervisor of Secondary Education 

W. D(>an Manifold Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Howard B. Owens w, Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Emma M. Bowman ^. Supervisor of Elementary Education 

?:unice E. Burdette Supervisor of Elementary Flducation 

Rita M. Donovan Supervisor of Elementary Education 

William W. Hall Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Leila V. Hardesty . Supervisor of Elementary Education 

A. Mildred Hoyle. Supervisor of Elementary Education 

p]iizabeth C:. Kelly Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Elizabeth McMahon Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Margaret A. Beardsley Supervisor of Kind<>rgartens 

Mrs. Jean D. Grambs SuF)ervisor of Adult Education 



12 



PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Name Office 

Mrs. Mary Beth Wackwitz Supervisor of Arr 

Mary A. Thompson Supervisor of Health Education and Health Services 

June E. Lippy Supervisor of Health Education and Health Services 

M. Gladys Dickerson Supervisor of Home Economics 

Elmer K. Zeller Supervisor of Industrial and Vocational Education 

Mrs. Louise Bennett Supervisor of Libraries 

Mrs. Frances H. Lynch Supervisor of Music 

Mrs. Doris K. Newman Supervisor of Reading Clinic 

Vincent C. Holochwost Supervisor of Physical Education 

Ada M. Warrington Supervisor of Physical Education 

Victor Rice Psychological and Testing Specialist 

Mrs. Martha Odell School Psychologist 

C. Elizabeth Rieg Supervisor of Special Services 

Mrs. Thelma Darling Home Teacher 

Mrs. Louise Hudgins Home Teacher 

Marian E. Lobdell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

George Charlesworth Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elizabeth W. Hamilton Visiting Teacher 

Willie H. Henson Visiting Teacher 

Lillian L. Harvey Visiting Teacher 

Robert Jenkins Visiting Teacher 

M. Dorothy Jump Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Arlene A. Korn Visiting Teacher 

John R. Moyer Visiting Teacher 

Charles O. Wendorf Visiting Teacher 

Arthur E. Robinson Supervisor of Maintenance 

Armand Biscontini Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Franklin B. Klase Assistant Supervisor of Custodial Services 

William H. Smith. Senior Building Inspector 

Alan Poole Junior Building Inspector 

Flora Schroyer Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Stella J. Wingert Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

John W. Heim Supervisor of Transportation 

Russell O. Eckert Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Ruth Jefferson Assistant 'Treasurer 

Mrs. Helen S. Bowie Secretary to Superintendent 

QUEEN ANNE'S COUNTY 
Centreville 

Harry C. Rhodes Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Alberta C. Browne Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Margaret S. Stack Supervisor 

John H. Webb Supervisor 

Mrs. Lola P. Brown Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Marie Shortall Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Bonel P. Zakarian Stenographer 

Frances Meredith Typist 

ST. MARY'S COUNTY 
Leonardtown 

Lettie M. Dent Superintendent of Schools 

Robert E. King, Jr. Assistant Superintendent 

E. Violette Young Supervisor of White Elementary Schools 

Ralph S. Waters Supervisor of Colored Schools 

Harriet H. Reeder Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Elberta W. Hayden Clerk-Bookkeeper 

Ellen Oliver Stenographer 

Mrs. Grace D. Cross Stenographer 

Mrs. Ruth P. Lewis Clerical Assistant 

Mrs. Eulalia O. Goddard Clerical Assistant 

SOMERSET COUNTY 

Courthouse Annex, Princess Anne 

C. Allen Carlson Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Alice Mae C. Beauchamp Supervisor of Elementary Education 

John L. Bond Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Kermit A. Cottman Supervisor of Elementary and Secondary Education 

Charles O. Burns, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Alva Bozman Laird Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Marian Tyler Colborn Stenographer-Typist 

TALBOT COUNTY 
Washington Street, Easton 

Raymond O. McCullough, Jr Superintendent of Schools 

Arthur R. Higginbottom Supervisor of High Schools 

M. Lillian Cheezum Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Kathleen A. Francis Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia S. G. Darrow Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 



13 



TALBOT COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Name Office 

P. Kennard Wright Supervisor of Maintenance 

Sheldon E. Dietert Controller 

Mrs. Eileen 'H. Camper Stenographer 

WASHINGTON COUNTY 

Commonwealth Avenue, Hagerstown 

William M. Brish Superintendent of Schools 

William C. Diehl Assistant Superintendent 

Wesley N. Dorn Assistant Superintendent for Business Affairs 

William L. Donaldson Director of Instruction 

Annilea H. Browne Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Frances Grimes Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Alva D. Temple Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Rebekah B. Stonebraker Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Douglas M. Bivens Supervisor of Senior High Schools 

Miriam L. Hoffman Supervisor of Music 

Alfred C. Roth, Jr ^ Supervisor of Vocational and Industrial Arts 

H. Edwin Semler Supervisor of Physical Education 

Catherine L. Beachley Supervisor of Guidance and Research 

Russell L. Kepler Supervisor of Plant Operations 

Delbert G. Summerville Supervisor of New Construction 

Claude B. Brubeck Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Anormallee M. Way Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

T. Wilson Cahall Supervisor of Instruction (Closed-Circuit Television Project) 

John R. B rugger Chief Engineer (Closed-Circuit Television Project) 

Robert F. Lesher Supervisor of Production (Closed-Circuit Television Project) 

V. Richard Martin Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

John E. McCue Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Frances H. Machen Visiting Teacher 

Charles W. Ridenour Visiting Teacher 

Mary E. Byer Special Personnel Services 

Joseph H. Vance Supervisor of Finance 

Carl M. Mann Supervisor of Purchases 

WICOMICO COUNTY 
Main Street, Salisbury 

James M. Bennett Superintendent of Schools 

Louise L. Mitchell Supervisor of Instruction 

Martha R. Jones Supervisor of Instruction 

Royd A. Mahaffey, Jr Supervisor of Instruction 

Marie A. Dashiell Supervisor of Instruction 

Sheldon B. Dawson Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Cora G. Smith Visiting Teacher 

Branche H. Phillips, Jr '. Supervisor of Transportation 

Joanna Lankford Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Geneva D. Smith Bookkeeper 

Juanita L. Townsend Secretary to Superintendent 

Dorothy A. Figgs Clerk-Stenographer 

Mrs. Constance R. Ruark Clerk-Stenographer 

WORCESTER COUNTY 
Market Street, Snow Hill 

Paul D. Cooper Superintendent of Schools 

Paul S. Hyde Director of Instruction 

Alfred S. Hancock Supervisor of Instruction 

Mrs. Louise S. Adkins Supervisor of Instruction 

Mrs. Annie B. Downing Supervisor of Instruction 

Benjamin W. Nelson Supervisor of Maintenance and Transportation 

Wilbur A. Jones :: Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Elsie M. Dryden Clerk 



14 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 16 

Legislation Affecting Education 17 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 24 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education: 

Certification and Accreditation 46 

Instruction 56 

Library Extension 73 

Vocational Education 83 

Vocational Rehabilitation 88 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 90 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Public and Nonpublic Schools 90 

Number Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools 91 

Education for Handicapped Children, Schools and Classes for 

Atypical Children 92 

Births in Maryland 100 

Withdrawals in Public Schools 103 

Average Number Pupils Belonging 104 

Grade Enrollment 106 

Nonpromotions in Public Schools 113 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 116 

High School Enrollment: by Subject 123 

High School Teachers 124 

Enrollment in Individual High School Subjects 125 

Teachers: by Summer School Attendance, Certification, Preparation, 

Resignations, Turnover, Source 138 

Number and Size of Schools 152 

State Minimum Program 154 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

Total, Per Cent from State 155 

Distribution of Tax Dollar 157 

Cost per Pupil 158 

Salaries 164 

Transportation 168 

Adult Education, Vocational Education 170 

School Lunch, School Milk 176 

Capital Outlay, Bonded Indebtedness, Value of School Property 180 

County Levies, Assessments, Tax Rates 184 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges; Junior Colleges 189 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 198 

Parent-Teacher Associations 199 

Baltimore City Summer Schools; High School Equivalence 200 

Vocational Rehabilitation 202 

Library Extension, Aid to School Libraries 204 

Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 207 

Index 250 



15 



Baltimore, Maryland 
January 1, 1958 

The Honorable Theodore R. McKeldin 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Dear Governor McKeldin: 

In accordance with the provision of the laws of Maryland, 
I have the honor to present to you herewith, the ninety-first "an- 
nual report covering all operations of the State department of 
education and the support conditions, progress and needs of educa- 
tion throughout the State" for the period beginning July 1, 1956, 
and ending June 30, 1957. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 
Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 



16 



Maryland State Department of Education 



17 



1957 MARYLAND 
LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION 

Additional Requirements for Awarding School Building Contracts 

Chapter 15, House Bill 33, adds a provision to competitive bidding on school 
building contracts in excess of $1,000 requiring that the award be made to 
lowest responsible bidder meeting specifications with consideration being 
given to quantities involved, time required for delivery, purpose for which 
required, competency and responsibility of bidder, and his ability to render 
satisfactory service. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 36, Senate Bill 87, clarifies the provisions of Section 114 (b) of Article 77 
by correcting a reference to its applicability. The Act changes the word 
"section" to "subsection." Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Supplementary Pensions — Kent County 

Chapter 37, Senate Bill 93, adds Subsection (c) to Section 114 of Article 77 to 
authorize the County Commissioners of Kent County to pay to any county 
school teacher retired prior to July 1, 1956, who is receiving aggregate bene- 
fits of less than $125 per month, an additional sum not to exceed $50 per 
month. Total benefits are not to exceed $125 per month. Effective date: 
date of passage. 

Handicapped Children — Preschool Education 

Chapter 38, Senate Bill 11, adds Section 235A to Article 77 to provide for a special 
appropriation of not less than $250,000 to be placed in the State Budget for 
the special education of handicapped children under 6 years of age. Effective 
date: July 1, 1957. (Legislature failed to appropriate funds for 1957-58.) 

Handicapped Children — Preschool Education 

Chapter 39, Senate Bill l<i, repeals and re-enacts Section 64 of Article 77 to pro- 
vide that a census of handicapped children both of preschool and school age 
shall be included in the regular school census of children under 18 years of 
age which a board of education may cause to be taken. Effective date: 
July 1, 1957. 

Approval of School Construction Contracts — Talbot County 

Chapter 51, Senate Bill 176, repeals and re-enacts Section 71 of Article 77 to give 
the County Commissioners of Talbot County the right to reject any and all 
bids for school construction and to direct the Board of Education to read- 
vertise for other bids. No school construction contracts may be entered 
into by the Board without approval by the County Commissioners. Effective 
date: June 1, 1957. 

Supplementary Pensions — Washington County 

Chapter 68, House Bill 128, adds Section 115A to Article 77 to authorize the 
County Commissioners of Washington County to pay to any retired school 
teacher of the County who is receiving aggregate benefits of less than $150 
per month, an additional sum not to exceed $50 per month. Total benefits 
are not to exceed $150 per month. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Transportation of Nonpublic School Children — Cecil County 

Chapter 70, House Bill 158, repeals and re-enacts Section 378 of the Code of Public 
Local Laws of Cecil County, to provide that children attending schools in 
Cecil County which do not receive State aid shall be entitled to transportation 
on the public school buses. The transportation is to be from a point on the 
public highway nearest their homes to and from any of such schools as may be 
located within a town which the bus is serving. Effective date: date of 
passage. 



18 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



Scholarships to Hood College — Frederick County 

Chapter 83, Senate Bill 147, repeals and re-enacts Section 273 (c) of Article 77 to 
provide that the tuition scholarships for Frederick County shall be awarded 
by the authorities of Hood College from the Hst of successful apphcants pass- 
ing the examination. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Director of Public Works — Wicomico County 

Chapter 135, House Bill 415, adds a new Section 70A to Article 23 of the Code of 
Public Local Laws of Maryland, to authorize the creation of the office of 
Director of Pubhc Works in Wicomico County. The Director is empowered 
to supervise various planning and construction operations in the County. 
In addition, he is to aid, assist, and advise the Wicomico County Board of 
Education in the matter of construction and maintenance of buildings and 
grounds, upon request of the Board. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Board of Education — Montgomery County 

Chapter 172, House Bill 191, repeals and re-enacts subsection 12 fa) of Article 77 
to provide overlapping terms for the elected members of the Montgomery 
County Board of Education. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Bond Authorization — Howard County 

Chapter 220, Senate Bill 373, authorizes the County Commissioners of Howard 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $500,000 for the construction 
and equipping of a high school at Glenelg. Effective date: date of passage. 

Bond Authorization — Frederick County 

Chapter 227, Senate Bill 435, authorizes the County Commissioners of Frederick 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $4,000,000 to construct new 
school buildings, to acquire land, and to expand present facilities. Effective 
date: June 1, 1957. 

Bond Authorization — Baltimore City 

Chapter 239, House Bill 39, authorize'^ the Mayor and City Council of Baltimore 
to borrow an amount not to exceed $5,000,000 for the acquisition of land 
and for the construction of school facilities. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Scholarships in Undergraduate Departments of University of Maryland in 
Baltimore City 

Chapter 244, House Bill 87, repeals and re-enacts Section 258 of Article 77 to 
permit undergraduate students in certain of the Baltimore City schools of 
the University of Maryland to be considered as being in undergraduate de- 
partments at College Park for the purpose of being eligible for the scholar- 
ships provided for in Section 258 of Article 77. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Supplementary Pensions — Caroline and Cecil Counties 

Chapter 274, House Bill 492, repeals and re-enacts certain sut sections of Section 
114 of Article 77 to authorize the County Commissioners of CaroHne and 
Cecil Counties to pay to any county school teacher retired prior to July 1, 
1956, who is receiving aggregate benefits of less than $125 per month, an 
additional sum not to exceed $50 per month. Total benefits are not to 
exceed $125 per month. Effective date: date of passage. 

Bond Authorization — Talbot County 

Chapter 288, House Bill ;'88, authorizes the County Commissioners of Talbot 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $1,200,000 to acquire land and 
to construct new schools. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Bond Authorization — Harford County 

Chapter 299, Senate Bill 248, authorizes the County Commissioners of Harford 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $1,500,000 for the purpose of 
erecting and equipping school buildings. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



19 



Temporary Use of School Buildings in Anne Arundel and Cecil Counties 

Chapter 337, House Bill 327, repeals and re-enacts Section 80 of Article 77 to 
permit the school buildings in Anne Arundel and Cecil counties to be used 
temporarily for religious purposes. The bill also provides that volunteer 
firemen's carnivals may be held on the public school grounds in these two 
counties. Effective date: date of passage. 

Bond Authorization — Allegany County 

Chapter 342, House Bill 484, authorizes the County Commissioners of Allegany 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $1,200,000 for the purpose of 
constructing certain new schools and making certain additions and repairs 
to specifically enumerated existing schools. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Bond Authorization — Calvert County 

Chapter 348, House Bill 611, authorizes the County Commissioners of Calvert 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $2,000,000 for the construction, 
remodeling, and equipping of school facilities. The Act also creates an 
Advisory Board of residents of the County to consult with and advise the 
County Commissioners and the Board of Education on problems relating 
to the selection and cost of sites and the construction of school buildings* 
Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Legal Services — Howard County 

Chapter 352, House Bill 655, adds a new subsection to Subsection 53 of Article 77 
to empower the Howard County Board of Education to arrange for legal 
services up to the amount of $500 without prior approval of the County Com- 
missioners. Effective date: date of passage. 

Board of Education — Frederick County 

Chapter 355, House Bill 677, repeals and re-enacts Section 46 of Article 77 to 
increase from $100 to $300 the amount each member of the Frederick County 
Board of Education shall receive annually for traveling and other expenses. 
Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Bond Authorization — Cecil County 

Chapter 358, House Bill 695, authorizes the County Commissioners of Cecil 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $2,000,000 to finance the con- 
struction of new school buildings and to pay the professional fees in connec- 
tion with such construction. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

County Engineer- Cecil County 

Chapter 368, House Bill 201, adds a new Section 120A to the Code of PubHc Local 
Laws of Cecil County to provide for a county engineer in Cecil County to 
advise the County Commissioners and the Board of Education on the award- 
ing of any contracts Tor public school buildings and construction in the County 
and on the selection of architects for such construction. The engineer shall 
supervise all maintenance contracts in excess of $1,000. Effective date: 
date of passage. 

Maryland Institute 

Chapter 381, Senate Bill 88, repeals Chapter 313 of the Laws of Maryland, 1878, 
as amended from time to time, the last said amendment being that contained 
in Chapter 139 of the Laws of Maryland, 1906, to enact a new charter for 
the Maryland Institute which recognizes the Institute's growth in the field 
of the fine arts. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Supplementary Pensions — Anne Arundel County 

Chapter 382, Senate Bill 158, repeals and re-enacts Section 114 of Article 77 to 
authorize the County Commissioners of Anne Arundel County to pay to 
any retired county school teacher who is receiving aggregate benefits of less 
than $125 per month, an additional sum not to exceed $50 per month. Total 
benefits are not to exceed $125 per month. These additional sums are not 
to be paid to any teacher who receives both retirement and social security 
benefits. Effective date: January 1, 1958. 



20 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



Bond Authorization — Wicomico County 

Chapter 417, Senate Bill 522, authorizes the County Commissioners of Wicomico 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $900,000 to construct and expand 
school faciHties. The Act provides for the formation of a School Building 
Commission to advise with the County Commissioners and the Board of 
Education regarding the expenditure of the proceeds of the bonds. Effective 
date: date of passage. 

Supplementary Pensions — Harford County 

Chapter 418, Senate Bill 526, authorizes the County Commissioners of Harford 
County to pay an additional sum to certain retired school teachers sufficient 
to make the total amount of each pension $125 per month. The teachers 
to receive this benefit are named in the bill. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Supplementary Pensions 

Chapter 491, Senate Bill 534, repeals and re-enacts Section 8 of Article 25 to 
authorize the county commissioners of the several counties to pay to any 
retired school teacher of their county who is receiving aggregate benefits of 
less than $125 per month, an additional sum not to exceed $50 per month. 
Total benefits are not to exceed $125 per month. Effective date: June 1, 
1957. 

Bond Authorization — Caroline County 

Chapter 499, Senate Bill 563, authorizes the County Commiissioners of CaroHne 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $3,000,000 for the purpose of 
building new schools, expanding existing faciHties, or for matching Federal 
or State funds to accompHsh this purpose. The Act specifies the locations, 
construction work, and amount to be expended for each school. Joint 
approval of the Board of Education and the County Commissioners is re- 
quired on all construction contracts. Effective date: date of passage. 

Supplementary Pensions — Garrett County 

Chapter 512, Senate Bill 639, adds a new Section 462A to Article 12 of the Code of 
Public Local Laws of Maryland to authorize the County Commissioners of 
Garrett County to pay to county school teachers retired prior to June 1, 1928, 
a sum sufficient to make the total amount of each pension at least ii>l,200 per 
year. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Licensing of Driver Training Schools 

Chapter 517, House Bill 12, adds new Sections 332 through 339 to Article 663,2 
to provide that the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles shall license and regulate 
all driver training schools in this State. Effective date: July 1, 1957. 

General Construction Loan of 1957 

Chapter 532, House Bill i56, authorizes the creation of a State debt of $16,806,100, 
the proceeds of which will be used to construct, equip, and acquire land for 
necessary State buildings. Funds for certain capital improvements at the 
State teachers colleges are included in this Act. Following are the amounts 
allocated to each of the colleges: 



Bowie 



Plans and specifications for demonstration school. 

Construction of library building 

Parking facilities, roads and walks, etc 



$ 5,000 
290,000 
25,000 



Total 



$320,000 



Frostburg 

Construction of demonstration school 

Site improvements 

Relocation of athletic facilities and landscaping 



$610,000 
45,000 
64,000 



Total 



$719,000 



Maryland State Department of Education 



21 



Salisbury 

Plans and specifications for gymnasium $ 6,000 

Additional facilities for demonstration school 125,000 

Student activities building 60,000 

Remodeling old demonstration school 10,000 



Total $201,000 

Towson 

Remodel old library $ 53,500 

Refurbish exterior of Newell Hall 35,000 

Electrical distribution system 23,500 

Construction of demonstration school 735,000 

Construction of incinerator 9,500 



Total $856,500 

Coppin 

Construction of auditorium-gymnasium-classroom 

building $476,000 

Site improvements 21,000 

Parking facilities, etc 30,000 

Convert residence to student center 16,000 



Total $543,000 



Effective date: June 1, 1957. 



Supplementary Pensions — Charles County 

Chapter 597, House Bill 479, adds a new Section 114A to Article 77 to authorize 
the County Commissioners of Charles County to pay to any retired county 

^ school teacher who is receiving aggregate beneifits of less than $115 per month, 
an additional sum not to exceed $25 per month. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 



Maximum Speed of School Buses 

Chapter 607, House Bill 508, repeals and re-enacts Section 226 of Article to 
increase the maximum permissible speed of school buses from 35 MPH to 
45 MPH. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 



Bond Authorization — Prince George's County 

Chapter 634, House Bill 616, authorizes the County Commissioners of Prince 
George's County to borrow an amount not to exceed $15,000,000 to finance 
the construction, acquisition, and extension of public school facilities in the 
County. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 



Social Security Coverage for Long-Service Teachers 

Chapter 636, House Bill 622, temporarily waives the provisions of Section 109 
^ of Article 77 to permit teachers who were at least 68 years and 6 months 
of age and less than 70 years of age as of July 1, 1956, to continue in service 
or to be restored to their teaching positions after they reach age 70 and 
until they have served 6 calendar quarters after July 1, 1956, or until they 
have served long enough to qualify for minimum social security benefits. 
Effective date: date of passage. 



Bond Authorization — Charles County 

Chapter 725, House Bill 927, authorizes the County Commissioners of Charles 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $500,000 for the construction, 
remodeling, and equipping of schools in the county. Effective date: June 
1, 1957. 



22 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



Use of School Facilities for Political Meetings 

Chapter 739, Senate Bill 8, repeals Article 33 and enacts in lieu thereof a new 
Article 33 to revise the election laws of the State. Section 210 of the bill 
provides that public school facilities may be used for public meetings, partisan 
poHtical meetings and campaign programs and for other purposes incident 
to a pohtical campaign for nomination of election to public office. Effective 
date: June 1, 1957. 

Use of Schools for Certain Purposes — Calvert, Harford, and Prince George's 
Counties 

Chapter 797, House Bill 730, repeals and re-enacts Section 80 of Article 77 to 
authorize the use of pubhc school houses in Calvert, Harford, and Prince 
George's counties for political, religious, and election purposes. The Act 
further provides that in Prince George's County the facilities of the University 
of Maryland and facilities at any other institution of higher learning sup- 
ported by pubhc funds, may also be used for such pruposes. Effective date: 
June 1, 1957. 

Bond Authorization — Anne Arundel County 

Chapter 823, House Bill 903, authorizes the Board of Education of Anne Arundel 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $10,000,000 to finance the con- 
struction or extension of pubhc schools in the County. Effective date: 
June 1, 1957. 

Junior College Tuition — Charles County 

Chapter 830, House Bill 919, adds a new Section 841 to Article 9 of the Code of 
Public Local Laws of Maryland to direct the County Commissioners of Charles 
County to appropriate funds to subsidize the tuition of a maximum of 200 
students up to $200 each at any junior college established in the County by 
the Board of Education. Effective date: June 1, 1957. 

Joint FvEsolutions 

Teacher Recruitment 

Joint Resolution 3, Senate Joint Resolution 5, recommends that the State De- 
partment of Education strengthen its central recruiting effort for new ceachers. 

Teacher Preparation for Liberal Arts Graduates at University of Maryland 
Joint Resolution 4, Senate Joint Resolution 6, requests the State Department 
of Education and the University of Maryland to study the possibility for a 
program of teacher training for liberal arts graduates of the University. 

Meritorious Service Recognition for Teachers 

Joint Resolution 6, Senate Joint Resolution 7, requests the State Department 
of Education and the several local boards of education to study possibiUties 
of giving formal recognition of meritorious services performed by pubhc 
school teachers. Suggests the creation of a "Master Teacher" position at a 
somewhat higher scale of pay. 

State Retirement System 

Joint Resolution 10, Senate Joint Resolution 17, requests a thorough study of the 
three State retirement systems. 

State Retirement Funds — Investment in School Bonds 

Joint Resolution 12, Senate Joint Resolution 18, requests that the funds of the 
several State retirement systems be invested in public school building bonds 
of the counties and Baltimore City. 

Handicapped Children Preschool Education Survey 

Joint Resolution 36, House Joint Resolution 6, requests the State Department 
of Education to make a survey of the potential development of a program 
for the preschool education of handicapped children over the period of the 
next 5 years. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



23 



Coppin State Teachers College 

Joint Resolution 39, House Joint Resolution 4, requests repeal of J. R. 12 (1955) 
which directed the Board of Public Works to use land at Coppin State Teach- 
ers College for an armory site. 

Simple Resolutions 

Senate 

Acceleration of Superior Students 

Senate Resolution 34 urges a study of a means of accelerating the educational 
program of superior students commensurate with their ability to learn. 

School Construction 

Senate Resolution 82 requests the Legislative Council to study the needs of the 
public school system of the State for new and expanded school facilities. 

House 

Technical Education beyond the High School — Allegany County 

House Resolution 22 requests the State Board of Education to study the de- 
sirability of planning public education beyond high school for youths in 
Allegany County to equip them for technical employment. 

State Aid to Education beyond the High School 

House Resolution 56 requests the Governor to refer to the Commission on Higher 
Education a re-study of State aid to education beyond the secondary school 
level. 



24 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 
AND THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

August 29, 1956 

Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole and Mr. George C. Rhoderick, Jr. were 
welcomed as new members of the State Board of Education. 

Two recent opinions of the Attorney General were brought to 
the attention of the Board. In the first, given in response to the 
question raised by several county superintendents, the Attorney 
General advised that salaries of substitute teachers may not be paid 
from the Equalization fund. 

The next opinion was given following questions raised by the 
Superintendent of Schools, Montgomery County, in connection 
with a resolution passed by the Montgomery County Council. This 
resolution concerned the selection of a site for a school and the fixing 
of teachers' salaries. In an opinion dated August 23, 1956, the 
Attornej^ General advised: "Nowhere in the Public School Laws 
of Maryland is there an indication that the selection of a site for a 
proposed school is in any way the concern of the County Council 
or other county legislative or administrative body. The County 
Board of Education and the State Superintendent of Schools are 
the proper agencies for determining the location of public schools 
within the State, and such matters are beyond the authority of the 
county's legislative body. However, it is likewise clear that, once 
a site has been selected, the decision as to the issuance of bonds or 
other appropriation of funds for the school building is within the 
exclusive discretion of the County Council." In reference to 
teachers' salaries, the Attorney General stated that it is made clear 
in Article 77 "that the amount of salary increases to be paid teachers 
in various counties is solely within the discretion of the County 
Board of Education. The responsibility of a County Council as 
to the appropriation of the necessary funds for providing increases 
in teachers' salaries does not permit it to determine the allocation of 
such funds among teachers and supervisory personnel. The latter 
function has been placed by the Legislature under the control of the 
various County Boards of Education." 

Members of the Board were given copies of the report, "Re- 
quirements for County Audit Reports," prepared by the superin- 
tendents' committee on the audit of financial operations of local 
boards of education, to give superintendents a better understanding 
of an adequate audit and help them make certain they are getting 
the kind of audit which they should receive. 

Mr. William S. Sartorius, Director of Administration and 
Finance, reviewed briefly the 1958 budget requests for the State 
Department of Education Headquarters, Vocational Rehabilitation, 
and State Teachers Colleges. These requests of $5,285,853 rep- 
resented an increase of $888,419 over the 1957 appropriation. 

The State Superintendent reported that he had approved the 
termination of an experimental period relating to provision for 



Maryland State Department of Education 



25 



guidance and library services in the high schools. According to 
Bylaw 74, the ratio of high school teachers to pupils enrolled shall, 
for the duration of the experimental period to be determined by the 
State Superintendent of Schools, include a fixed teacher-time allow- 
ance for guidance and library service which must be administered 
by fully-certified personnel and scheduled in order to secure the 
maximum number of teachers allowed. Henceforth, the maximum 
number of teachers will be allowed regardless of the amount of time 
scheduled for these services. The action of the State Superintendent 
was approved by the Attorney General as to legality. 

The Board was advised that Baltimore City and every county, 
except Caroline, have taken some formal action in respect to imple- 
menting the decision of the Supreme Court in regard to segregaton. 
Each local board of education has accepted the Supreme Court's 
decision as the law of the land and has expressed the intention of 
implementing it with deliberate speed, which, of course, will vary 
with the counties. 

The State Superintendent reported that at the request of several 
superintendents he had approved the elimination of the word 
''assistant" from the elementary teacher's certificate. Even though 
the law refers to ''assistant teacher" and "principal teacher," there 
is no specific legal requirement for continuing the use of the word 
"assistant" on the elementary teacher's certificate; the principal's 
certificate does not carry the designation "principal teacher." The 
Attorney General has approved the action of the State Superin- 
tendent. 

The Board went on record as approving the following recom- 
mendations of the State Superintendent concerning a new salary 
schedule for the public school teachers of Maryland: a State 
minimum salary scale of $3, 600 -$5,400, a fiat increase of $800 over 
the existing schedule, with the increase being effected at the rate of 
$400 per year over a two-year period beginning July 1, 1957, the 
cost to be borne by the State and distributed through basic aid. 

This action was taken after each member of the Board had been 
given a copy of a "Special Report to the Maryland State Board of 
Education on Teachers' Salaries." In commenting on this subject, 
the State Superintendent stated that the basic truism in this problem 
is not that teachers be paid a fair wage, equitable and fair as the 
proposition is, but that children in the public schools be furnished 
with qualified, competent teachers. It is essential that it be rec- 
ognized that an adequate salary is the only guarantee that competent 
teachers can be secured. 

The present State minimum beginning salary for a teacher with 
I a bachelor's degree is $2,800, and it takes ten years to reach the maxi- 
mum of $4,600. Every county and Baltimore City supplement 
( this minimum salary, with the result that beginning salaries range 
from $3,000 to $3,600. The counties and Baltimore City supple- 
ment State minimum salaries by nearly $18,000,000, and next year 
the amount will be even greater. 



26 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



In 1947 the beginning minimum was raised by $700 with 
corresponding increases along the Hne. The net result was an al- 
most immediate high rise in the enrollment in the teachers colleges 
and a great improvement in teacher recruiting. Maryland's average 
teacher salary became one of the highest in the country, ranking 
third and fourth in short order. However, Maryland dropped to 
twelfth place in 1954, thirteenth in 1955, with every indication that 
it will go much lower this year. The important point is not the rela- 
tive pay position; it is what happens in respect to the qualifications 
of teachers and the quality of teaching. 

The present salary schedule which was enacted in 1953 was rec- 
ommended by the Green Commission and was put into effect in two 
stages. Its effectiveness was complete last year, and undoubtedly 
it has served greatly to alleviate the situation with respect to em- 
ployment of teachers. However, the cost of living and the national 
economy in general have expanded so much that that schedule is 
no longer adequate. 

In the light of the conferences which have been held with school 
superintendents, teachers, parents, businessmen, and others, and the 
strong opinions expressed by them, the following conclusions have 
been reached: 

1. The State Board should take positive action in respect to 
recommending and supporting a realistic salary schedule 
for the teachers in the public schools of Maryland. 

2. A realistic salary schedule would be sufficient to 

a. Guarantee an adequate supply of qualified teachers 
in the least financially able unit in the State without 
any effort on the unit's part except to meet the 
equalization fund requirement. 

b. Guar.-^.ntee an adequate supply of qualified teachers 
in all other local school systems with additional and 
relative financial effort on their part. 

3. A realistic minimum salary schedule, in the opinion of 
those who have studied the problem, should begin with an 
annual salary of at least $4,000; however, for the time being, 
this amount can be realized only in a few counties and Balti- 
more City — therefore, the minimum beginning State salary 
should be $3,600, with corresponding increases in the upper 
brackets of the present salary schedule. In brief, the salary 
schedule for teachers should be $3,600, to $5,400, in annual 
increments of $200. Recent studies show that the salaries 
of supervisory and administrative personnel have not kept 
pace with those of teachers. These salaries should be 
studied and revised accordingly. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



27 



4. The new salary schedule should be put into effect with the 
fiscal year 1957-58 and should conform with one of the 
following patterns, preferably the first: 

a. New schedule to take effect in its entirety as of July 
1, 1957 

b. Limit each teacher to a raise of $400 annually until 
schedule is in effect; this will mean taking two years 
to put the schedule into effect. 

5. The cost of the increase should be borne by the State and 
be distributed through basic aid, preferably through aid per 
teacher. In effect the basic aid would be increased $800 
per teacher unit. 

6. The additional funds needed to put the proposals into effect 
would be between $21,000,000 and $22,000,000, half of 
this amount each year for two years if the second pattern 
is employed. The figures are inclusive, providing for re- 
tirement payments as well as salaries. 

Other Board action included the following: 

1. Adopted the following resolution on the retirement of Miss 
Ethel E. Sammis who retired on August 1, 1956: 

Resolution on Miss Ethel E. Sammis 

Miss Ethel Sammis came to the State Department of Education in 
September, 1939, as Assistant Supervisor of Physical Education and 
Recreation. Prior to this appointment Miss Sammis had been an 
instructor at the Towson State Normal School for eight years. She 
had also taught in the Emma Willard School in Troy, New York, for 
four years. 

Miss Sammis was immediately influential in helping the continuing 
development of the elementary school program in Health, Physical 
Educatioii, and Recreation. Especially remembered is her pioneer 
work in developing the folk dance and in having pupils and teachers 
participate in and enjoy this phase of the program 

2. Approved a change in Section 4 of Bylaw 56 to lift the 
prohibition against teachers' smoking on school premises 
during school hours. It was pointed out that local boards 
of education wishing to do so may enact additional restric- 
tions against the use of tobacco. 

Section 4 of Bylaw 56 is now stated as follows: 

Teachers and pupils are prohibited from using in- 
toxicants in any form on the school premises. 

Pupils are prohibited from using tobacco in any form 
on the school premises during school hours. 

November 28, 1956 

The Board approved the joint statement of working relation- 
ships between the Maryland State School for the Deaf and the 



28 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



State Department of Education. This statement, already approved 
by the Board of the School for the Deaf, is as follows: 

We believe that every child within the State of Maryland should have equal 
educational opportunities. We believe further that appropriate learning ex- 
periences should be provided to meet the specific and unique needs of each pupil. 
It is important that the educational requirements of deaf and hard-of-hearing 
children be clearly understood in planning a program to meet their particular 
needs. The quahtative and quantitative differences between deaf and hard-of- 
hearing children as compared with children having normal hearing need to be 
understood and appreciated in order that they may be offered the proper educa- 
tional program. 

All educational, medical, and welfare personnel as well as interested groups 
concerned should be fully cognizant of the special educational opportunities 
available for such children. They should be familiar with the particular oppor- 
tunities available in the Maryland State School for the Deaf and in the regular 
day schools. Deaf and hard-of-hearing children present communicative handi- 
caps that have great impHcations with reference to educational progress. The 
communicative skills of speech, lipreading, and language need special emphasis 
to insure that all children will receive the educational opportunities that are right- 
fully theirs. 

Early identification of deaf and hard-of-hearing children is essential if the 
medical and educational problems are to receive proper attention. Identification 
may come about in a number of ways. Chiefly they are: 

1. It is urged that all children discovered by the family physician, pedi- 
atrician, or otologist of having a real or suspected hearing loss be reported 
to the State Department of Health through the county health department. 

2. County health nurses and other professional persons in the county health 
departments, as well as classroom teachers and other school personnel, 
should be alert to identify such children and make proper reports to their 
administrative officero. Identification may come about by visitations 
in the homes and the various clinics that are conducted by the State 
Health Department. 

3. County welfare personnel discovering children with a real or suspected 
hearing loss should seek assistance from physicians and county health 
departments in securing diagnosis. 

4. County school superintendents shall prepare a hst of handicapped children 
in accordance with the provisions of Section 232, Article 77 of the An- 
notated Code of Maryland (1951 editions The results of this enumera- 
tion shall be reported to the State Department of Education, State 
Department of Health, and the directors of appropriate public institutions. 

a. Each local school system shall conduct a regular and con- 
tinuous program of audiometric testing of all children in 
public schools. 

b. The supervisors of pupil personnel and supervisors of special 
education shall be responsible for compiling lists of school 
children who have been tested and are suspected of having 
hearing losses. These lists will be used for the purpose of 
providing proper educational programs in the regular day 
schools, and for directing children to special educational situa- 
tions as offered by the residential school. Generally speaking, 
children with 35 decibel loss, or less, in the speech range, With 
proper attention can make good educational adjustment to 
regular public school classes. Specifically, any child with a 
hearing loss exhibiting language learning difficultiets, with 
reading and /or speech problem will need special techniques to 
overcome the educational problems unique to the deaf and to 
the hard-of-hearing child. The lists compiled should be made 



Maryland State Department of Education 



29 



in duplicate with one going to the Superintendent of the 
Maryland State School for the Deaf and one copy retained for 
their files. 

c. It is the responsibihty of the instructional staff of each county 
to see to it that each deaf and hard-of-hearing child is given 
the opportunities to meet his educational needs, recognizing 
the opportunities that are offered by the Maryland State 
School for the Deaf and those that may exist or be provided 
at the local level. 

d. Where hearing loss is suspected from the screening tests in 
school, a complete medical and audiological work-up should 
be done to evaluate the exact degree and type of hearing im- 
pairment, if any; the presence of associated handicaps; and 
the general health and intellectual adequacy of the child. 
This would include pediatric, otological, audiological, psycho- 
metric, and where indicated psychiatric evaluation. 

It is the responsibility of the Maryland State Department of Education, 
Maryland State School for the Deaf, and the county school systems to work 
co-operatively to meet the educational needs of deaf and hard-of-hearing children: 

1. They shall promote better understanding of the educational problems 
of deaf and hard-of-hearing children. 

2. They shall promote free exchange of information regarding this special 
area. 

3. County school systems shall be fully informed of the educational program 
offered by the Maryland State School for the Deaf. 

4. The Superintendent of the Maryland State School for the Deaf shall 
assist the county school systems in this understanding and offer pro- 
fessional services in assisting local authorities to meet the needs of hearing- 
handicapped children. Also, he shall serve as a consultant to the State 
Department of Education on matters pertaining to education of deaf and 
hard-of-hearing children. 

5. The State Department of Education shall be fully informed of the edu- 
cational program of the Maryland State School for the Deaf, rendering 
professional assistance to the school whenever desired. In order to 
implement this recommendation it is suggested that members of the 
State Department of Education make regular visitations to the School 
for the Deaf during each school year. These visitations shoald be planned 
co-operatively by the two agencies. 

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation of the State Depart- 
ment of Education will provide the services of a Rehabilitation 
Counselor to assist in the testing and counseling program with 
reference to vocational evaluations for eligible students at the 
Mar3iand State School for the Deaf. 

Outside consultative services should be shared by all three 
agencies mentioned above. 

Dr. John J. Seidel reported on the program for the extension 
of library service to rural areas under Public Law 597, the Library 
Services Act. The objectives of this program in Maryland are 
(1) that several counties establish county-wide public library 
service under the State law, and thereby become eligible for federal 
funds to promote the further development of public library service 



30 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



in the rural areas, defined to exclude towns of 10,000 or more, and 
(2) that neighboring county libraries, in areas with a combined 
potential population of 75,000 people, work together to develop 
mutually agreeable forms of co-operation and co-ordination of public 
library services. Miss Helen M. Clark, Director of Library Ex- 
tension, and Dr. Seidel attended a regional conference in Wash- 
ington on September 20 and 21, 1956, at which time the tentative 
regulations prepared by the Office of Education were presented 
for discussion. As a result of the various regional meetings which 
followed, these regulations are now being revised. When the 
final draft of the regulations is received, the State Department of 
Education, designated the official agency by Governor McKeldin, 
will be expected to submit a detailed plan to the U. S. Office of Edu- 
cation before becoming eligible for the $40,000 which will be allocated 
to Maryland for the fiscal year 1956-57. 

The following plan of operation was approved by the Board: 

1. The State Department of Education, through the Division of Library Ex- 
tension, will supervise the program, with guidance in its development and 
authority to assure the observance of the policies, standards, and methods of 
the State plan. 

2. Each county will operate its county library in accordance with the laws of 
Maryland relating to public Kbraries. 

3. The Division of Library Extension will transfer as many as 10,000 books 
from its collection to a book pool established to serve two or more counties 
in order to make a larger number of books available. 

4. For the half year, January — June, 1957, when only $40,000 is available in 
Maryland, three areas have been chosen for first effort. They are: 

Group 1. Somerset, Wicomico, and Worcester counties 
Group 2. Calvert, Charles, and St. Mary's counties 
Group 3. Allegany and Garrett counties 

Other groups will be considered if these do not participate. 

5. Distribution of federal funds 
a. Basis 

(1) To counties with estabhshed public Hbraries for the year ending 
June 30, 1956: 

(a) $4,00o annually to each county pubHc Hbrary serving less 
than 75,000 people, which works with a neighboring county 
or counties to develop forms of co-operation 

(b) $4,000 annually to each county public library serving a popula- 
tion larger than 75,000, which presents plans to insure the use 
of the money to promote the further development of public 
library service in its rural areas 

(2) To counties without e'-tablished public libraries for the year ending 
June 30, 1956: 

The remaining federal funds will be allotted each year to the 
counties which establish county public libraries after June 
30, 1956, under State law and work with a neighboring county 
or counties to develop forms of co-operation. Allotments will 
be made with a minimum of $4,000 to each county with a rural 
population under 20,000 and the remainder divided according 
to rural population. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



31 



b. Proposed federal allotments of the $40,000 for 1957 

(1) $16,000 to four existing county libraries 

(2) $24,000 to four new county libraries 

c. Proposed federal allotments of the $110,000 which Maryland will receive 
annually when the full amount authorized under the federal act is 
appropriated 

(1) $56,000 to fourteen existing county libraries 

(2) $54,000 to nine new county libraries 

Dr. Seidel reported next on the recommendations of the com- 
mittee appointed to study a long-term program of library service 
to every county and Baltimore City. The purpose of the rec- 
ommendations is to pattern the plan of financial support of public 
library service after the plan for support of public schools and to 
set up a State library building incentive fund. If all of the counties 
and Baltimore City were to participate in such a program, it was 
estimated that State aid required annually for operation would be 
$450,000 and for the incentive fund for library buildings, $319,000. 
It was pointed out that participation in the incentive fund would 
be optional. 

Special Recommendations for Equal Opportunity for Public Library Services 
In All Communities Throughout the State of Maryland 

The 1945 Maryland Legislature passed an act which created a central 
library agency as a division of the State Department of Education, to be known 
as the Division of Library Extension, which is under the immediate supervision 
of a Director, who is appointed by the State Board of Education on the nomination 
of the State Superintendent of Schools. At the same time the Legislature author- 
ized an appropriation of State funds for financing the public Hbraries in the State. 
The plan as outlined in that law and the funds made available under the existing 
law are not sufficient to begin library programs in a number of the small counties 
of the State, because the formula for the distribution of funds is on a population 
basis. Therefore, consideration should be given to additional legislation in order 
that more adequate support for local public libraries will be possible. Within 
the past few months the following program has been developed for this purpose. 

1. Long-term program 

The long-term program, when adopted, will require the State Legislature 
to make additional funds available for the further extension of pubHc library 
services to all the areas of the State. Its purpose would be to distribute 
equally State funds on a local basis to all the political subdivisions of the State. 
The factors involved in this proposed long-term program should be developed 
with the principle in mind that every citizen of the State should have at 
least a minimum program of library service available to him or her, regard- 
less of place of residence. Therefore the specific items to be included in 
such a long-term program would be as follows: 

A. County contribution (including Baltimore City) 

1. The contribution of the political subdivisions of the State should 
be at least 2c on the tax rate, or its equivalent, for each $100 assess- 
ment in that political subdivision. 

B. Basic aid from State funds 

1. The contribution from the State should be as follows: 

(a) The amounts that are not available under the existing law to 
all counties of the State, although only 14 counties and Balti- 
more City participate at the present time 



32 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



(b) The number of employees for the pubHc Hbrary system in the 
county to be estabhshed by using the ratio of one employee 
for each 9,000 population 

(c) The total number of persons employed to be divided between 
professional and general. Each county should have no less 
than 40 per cent and no more than 60 per cent professional 
employees. 

2. There shall be a minimum of four employees — two professional and 
two general for the smaller counties. 

3. Each county and Baltimore City will receive basic State aid of $1,200 
toward the salary of each professional employee' and $750 toward 
the salary of each general employee, if employed, up to the limit 
authorized under I.B.I (b) above. 

4. Two-thirds of the minimum State salary for the county librarian, 
or Hbrary administrator, is to be paid from State funds, 

C. County budget for library services (total cost of operation) 

The minimum cost of operating the county system of Hbraries will 
be determined by the aggregate salaries of professional' and general 
employees, divided by 6 and multiplied by 10, which will allow 40 per 
cent of the total minimum program to be spent for operating costs, of 
which at least one-half will be used for the purchase of books. 

D. State equalization aid 

If the cost of the minimum program is not met by combining the 
revenue from the county tax rate of 2c per $100 assessment with the 
contribution of the basic State aid payments mentioned in I.B.I and 3 
above, then the additional amount will be made available from a State 
equalization fund for library services. 

The ratio of one Hbrary employee to 9,000 population, is much 
lower than the standards as estabhshed by good current Hbrary practices. 
This ratio is acceptable to estabHsh an equalization procedure in financing 
the program of public library services throughout the State. The 
financial plan as outlined above will be in effect for two fiscal years, 
ending June 30, 1958, and June 30, 1959, respectively. 

The long-term program (six years) will require further consideration 
as follows: 

1. For the m.it two fiscal years, ending June 30, 1960, and June 30, 
1961, respectively, the ratio of Hbrary employees to population 
would be increased to one employee for each 6,000 population and 
the local tax rate would be increased to 3c per $100 assessment. 

2. For the following two fiscal years, ending June 30, 1962, and June 30, 
1963, respectively, the ratio of library employees to population would 
be increased to one employee for each 3,000 population and the local 
tax rate would be increased to Sy^c per $100 assessment. 

In order to distribute the State funds under this EquaHzation plan, 
it will be necessary to establish a minimum salary scale for all library em- 
ployees. However, it is definitely understood that in any such plan the 
minimum salary scale does not prevent any county, or Baltimore City, from 
paying its employees a salary beyond the minimum, provided such addi- 
tional funds are obtained from local funds. 



'Other than Library Administrator. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



33 



Minimum Salary Scale for Library Employees: 



Professional Employees 



County library administrator 

County librarian of special services 

County branch librarian 

Library assistant 



$5,281- 
. 4,777- 
. 4,273 
. 3,832 



$6,333 
5,729 
5,125 
4,594 



Geyieral Employees 



Library clerk. 
Senior typist 
Junior typist. 
Junior clerk... 



$3,076 
. 2,698 
. 2,446 
. 2,194 



$3,668 
- 3,235 
2,933 
2,631 



The above scale follows the State pattern of five annual increments of 
four per cent. 

Minimum salary scale used in calculating the total cost of a county 
library system, using the ratio of one employee to each 9,000 population. 



The citizens of Maryland are interested in public library service and the 
additional financial aid as outlined in the long-term plan will lay the foundation 
for another ten-year program of development and extension of library services to 
every community throughout the State of Maryland, regardless of its location. 

Need for State Incentive Fund for Financing Purchase of Land and Buildings 
for Libraries on a 25-Year Special Bond Basis at 3 Per Cent Interest Rate 

Four or five factors play an equally important part and it is imperative that 
they be included in a well-rounded program meeting the needs of public library 
services in the State of Maryland. These factors are fa^ adequacy of trained per- 
sonnel; (b) adequacy of supply and types of books; fc^ functionally de.signed library 
buildings; (d^ bookmobiles to carry public library services to the more remote 
rural areas. 

The operation of libraries, including salaries of personnel, costs of books 
and bookmobiles are included in the above-mentioned statement. Lack of 
buildings is jeopardizing the effective operation in almost all of the counties of 
the State. It is proposed to use the following plan for financing buildings to 
be used for library services by having the counties and Baltimore City sell 25-year 
bonds at approximately a 3 per cent interest rate. 

The basis for this library building incentive fund is a per capita cost of 
building based on population in the counties. It is recommended that this cost 
be 25 cents per capita for adequate functional buildings. Such bonds are to be 
financed from an incentive fund supported from two sources: 

1. There will be l o cent on the local tax rate for each county and Balti- 
more City, which will create a revenue which is to be supplemented 
by an incentive fund from State aid, the total of the two sources 
being equal to the population of the political subdivision multiplied 
by 25 cents. 

If the local counties are guaranteed this source of revenue, they could begin 
immediately to take option on or purchase desirable sites before there is an ex- 
cessive increase in land values in desirable locations. 

It is recommended that this State incentive fund for the financing of the 
purchase of lands and buildings be used to complete the program for the extension 
of equal library services to all the counties of the State. 



The State Superintendent informed the Board of a request, 
which he had granted, from the Chief of Naval Personnel in Wash- 
ington, to use, with slight modifications, the Maryland Transfer 
Certificate of High School Credits (Form 7141) in the Navy over- 



34 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



seas dependents schools. It was stated that, after the examination 
of many transfer record forms, the form issued by --.laryland State 
Department of Education 'Vas considered outstanding for its 
simplicity and directness, yet at the same time, sufficiently informa- 
tive." 

The first part of the report 'The Needs of Education in Mary- 
land, Report of the State Superintendent of Schools to the State 
Board of Education" was presented. The report will be the subject 
of an intensive co-operative study by the Department of Education, 
covering such areas as teacher training and recruitment; teacher wel- 
fare, including salaries; a program of education for the exceptional 
child; expansion of the public library system; special programs for 
the handicapped; certain changes in the curriculum; and the pro- 
viding of educational opportunities for youth beyond high school. 

The Board authorized the State Superintendent to seek an 
end to the restrictive clause by the Legislature, for the last two 
years, that use of adult education money be limited to the vocational 
educational program. 

The Board was informed that at the meeting of the college 
presidents with members of the State Board Committee on the State 
Teachers Colleges, it was recommended that the salary scale for the 
faculty, which was approved November, 1955, be revised to include 
a new category of Distinguished Instructor or Professor, with a 
minimum salary of $9,000. This classification would be for a limited 
number of outstanding individuals who have made a distinct con- 
tribution to the work at the teachers colleges and have received 
meritorious recognition in their field of specialization. It would be 
comparable with the rank of professor at most colleges and uni- 
versities. The committee recommended that ten such positions be 
included in the budget for 1958. The scale for Dean was revised 
to a fixed amount of $10,500, and that of President to $13,000. 

The committee also recommended that a program of sabbatical 
leave be inaugurated during the fiscal year 1958 for faculty members 
who have had six years of teaching in the State teachers colleges, 
have submitted satisfactory plans for advanced study, and have 
been recommended by the faculty committees and the presidents. 
Under this plan faculty members would be permitted to be on leave 
for one semester at full pay or a full year at half pay. The com- 
mittee recommended that provision be made in the 1958 budget for 
twelve faculty members to be on sabbatical leave. 

The Board approved the following revised salary schedule for 
the State teachers colleges: 



Maryland State Department of Education 



35 



Position Revised Scale* Increments 

President $13,000 

Dean 10,500 

Instructor 

Bachelor's Degree $3,500— $5,000 5— $300 

Master's Degree 4,500— 6,500 5— $400 

Master's Degree 30 credits 5,000— 7,000 5— $400 

Doctor's Degree $5,500— $8,000 5— $500 

Distinguished Instructor 

or Professor $9,000 

Principal of Demonstration School $500 above 

faculty scale 

Director of Practice $500 above 

faculty scale 

The Board reaffirmed its position in opposition to the transfer 
of any part of Coppin State Teachers College property to the Na- 
tional Guard, and the State Superintendent was directed to notify 
the Board of Public Works and the committees which appeared be- 
fore it of the Board's action. 

Other Board action included the following: 

1. Appointments and changes in positions on the staff of the State De- 
partment of Education as follows: 

Mr. Jesse C. Gawthrop — Auditor I, effective January 1, 1957 

Mr. Bernard Geyer — From Auditor I to Assistant Supervisor, effec- 
tive October 17, 1956 

Miss Sarah L. Leiter — Supervisor of Instruction, effective December 
1, 1956 

Mr. WilHs H. White — From Supervisor of High Schools to Assistant 
Director, effective October 17, 1956 

2. Adoption of the 1958 budget of $59,240,004 for State Aid to Education 
to the 23 counties and Baltimore City, representing an increase of 
$7,120,972 over the 1957 appropriation. 

3. An amenw'ment to the Special Milk Program Agreement No. 12-25-010- 
356. Amendment No. 1, effective August 1, 1956, states: *'It is 
mutually agreed that the State Agency shall not be responsible for the 
operation of the program in any nonprofit private school of high school 
grade and under, exempt from income tax under the Internal Revenue 
Code, as amended, and any nonprofit nursery school, child-care center, 
settlement house, summer camp, or similar nonprofit institution devoted 
to the care and training of children." 

4. An amendment to the present State plan for Vocational Education to 
initiate a program for practical nurse training. Under the provisions 
of PubHcLaw911, federal money from the George-Barden fund becomes 
available to the State, through the State Board of Education, for the 
development of practical nurse training in Maryland, in the same man- 
ner in which money is made available for training in agriculture, home 
economics, and trades and industry. Each member of the Board was 
given a copy of the "Maryland State Plan for Practical Nurse Training," 
dated November 28, 1956. This plan was prepared by members of the 
staff of the State Department of Education and reviewed unofficially 
by the U. S. Office of Education. It was developed around existing 
laws and regulation of Maryland for the training of practical nurses. 



*The Board recommended that each faculty person be placed on the new scale 
where he would receive a salary increase of not less than $200. 



36 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



The training program will be offered in the public schools, in co-operation 
with the general hospitals in the State, and will be open to students in 
the senior year of high school, graduates, and adults. Senior students 
who take the training will attend classes a half day and work in hospitals 
a half day. The State Board approved the plan as presented. 

(In the Board Minutes of February 28, 1957, the Board was advised 
that the Maryland plan for practical nurse training had been approved 
by the United States CfRce of Education and authorization had been 
given to use George-Barden, Title II (P.L. 911) funds for obHgations 
incurred on December 12, 1956, and thereafter.) 

5. Use of certain facilities at the State Teachers College at Salisbury in 
case of a national emergency 

6. The naming of certain buildings on the teachers college campuses as 
follows: 

Bowie 

Dormitory (Men) — D wight O. W. Holmes Hall 

New Dormitory (Women; — Lucretia T. Kennard Hall 

Gymnasium — Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin Gymnasium 

Frostburg 

Old Main— Old Main 

Old Dormitory (Women) — Catherine Frost Hall 
Science Hall — Garrett Hall 

New Dormitory (Women — I. Jewell Simpson Hall 
New Dormitory (Men) — Wendell D. Allen Hall 
New Dining-Union — WilHam A. Gunter Hall 
Old Gymnasium and Laboratory School — Allegany Hall 

Towson 

Administration Building — Stephens Hall 

Gymnasium — Wiedefeld Gymnasium 

Dormitories (Men) 

West Building— Henry S. West Hall 
North Building— George W. Ward Hall 

New Library — Albert S. Cook Library 

New Dormitory (Women) — E. B. Prettyman Hall 

February 27, 1957 

An open hearing was held before the State Board on behalf of 
eleven Negro children of Harford County who, through their at- 
torneys, presented an appeal from action taken by Mr. Charles W. 
Willis, Superintendent of Schools, Harford County, in refusing to 
grant applications for transfer to certain other schools in the county. 

The State Board subsequently (March 4, 1957) issued an 
opinion and order which included the following statements: 

The State Board finds that the Harford County Board acted within the policy 
established by the State Board in its Joint Resolution of June 22, 1955, on the 
subject of Desegregation in the Public Schools and in the State Teachers Colleges 
of Maryland. 

The State Board finds that the County Superintendent acted in good faith 
within the authority set forth in the August 1, 1956, Desegregation Policy adopted 
by the County Board of Education. The State Board also finds that the Dese- 
gregation Policy was adopted in a bona fide effort to make a reasonable start 
toward actual desegregation of the Harford County public schools. This initial 
effort has been carried out without any untoward incidents, which is a credit to 



Maryland State Department of Education 



37 



the citizens of Harford County, the Citizens' Consultant Committee, and the 
Harford County pubHc school authorities. 

The State Board also takes cognizance of the resolution of the County Board 
of February 6, 1957, as above mentioned, which sets forth an extension of de- 
segregation to become effective in the fall of 1957, as well as the testimony to the 
effect that the proposed Harford County Junior College, which is to be estab- 
lished in Bel Air in the fall of 1957, will open on a desegregated basis, and also 
the testimony to the effect that the present program of new buildings and addi- 
tions will make further desegregation possible. 

The State Board commends all parties, the witnesses, and counsel, in these 
proceedings, for the fair and dispassionate manner in which the facts and the 
arguments were presented. 

For the foregoing reasons, these appeals are hereby dismissed. 

Included in the opinion were the following statements review- 
ing the desegration policy in Harford County: 

The Harford County Board of Education adopted the following Desegrega- 
tion PoHcy on August 1, 1956: 

The Board of Education of Harford County appointed a Citizens' Consultant 
Committee of thirty-five members in July, 1955, to study the problems involved 
in the desegregation of Harford County Schools. This committee met in August, 
1955, and appointed subcommittees to make intensive studies of several phases 
of this problem. The full committee held its final meeting on February 27, 1956, 
heard subcommittee reports, discussed many aspects of the problem, and unani- 
mously resolved: 

To recommend to the Board of Education for Harford County that 
any child regardless of race may make individual apphcation to the 
Board of Education to be admitted to a school other than the one at- 
tended by such child, and the admissions to be granted by the Board of 
Education in accordance with such rules and regulations as it may 
adopt and in accordance with the available facihties in such schools; 
effective for the school year beginning September, 1956. 

This resolution was adopted by the Board of Education at its regular March 
meeting: 

At the regular June meeting of the Board of Education, a transfer pohcy 
was adopted, and procedures for requesting transfers were estabHshed. 

The Supreme Court decision, which required desegregation of pubhc 
schools, provided for an orderly, gradual transition based on the solution 
of varied local school problems. The resolution of the Harford County 
Citizens' Consultant Committee is in accord with this principle. The report 
of this committee leaves the establishment of policies based on the assessing 
of local conditions of housing, transportation, personnel, educational stand- 
ards, and social relationships to the discretion of the Board of Education. 

The first concern of the Board of Education must always be that of 
providing the best possible school system for all of the children of Harford 
County. Several studies made in areas where complete desegregation has 
been practiced have indicated a lowering of school standards that is detri- 
mental to all children. Experience in other areas has also shown that bitter 
local opposition to desegregation in a school system not only prevents an 
orderly transition, but also adversely affects the whole educational program. 

With these factors in mind, the Harford County Board of Education 
has adopted a policy for a gradual, but orderly, program for desegregation of 
the school of Harford County. The Board has approved applications for the 
transfer of Negro pupils from colored to white schools in the first three grades 



38 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



in the Edgewood Elementary School and the Halls Cross Roads Elementary 
School. Children living in these areas are already living in integrated hous- 
ing, and the adjustments will not be so great as in the rural areas of the 
county where such relationships do not exist. With the exception of two 
small schools, these are the only elementary buildings in which space is avail- 
able for additional pupils at the present time. 

Social problems posed by the desegregation of schools must be given care- 
ful consideration. These can be solved with the least emotionalism when 
younger children are involved. The future rate of expansion of this pro- 
gram depends upon the success of these initial steps. 

An excerpt from the Minutes of the Regular February Meeting of the Board 
of Education of Harford County, February 6, 1957, entitled "Extension of the 
Desegregation PoHcy for 1957-1958," is as follows: 

AppHcation for transfer will be accepted from pupils who wish to attend 
elementary schools in the areas where they Hve, if space is available in such 
schools. Space will be considered available in schools that were not more 
than 10% overcrowded as of February 1, 1957. All capacities are based 
on the state and national standard of thirty pupils per classroom. 

Under the above provision, applications will be accepted for transfer 
to all elementary schools except Old Post Road, Forest Hill, Bel Air, High- 
land, Jarrettsville, the sixth grade at the Edgewood High School, and DubHn. 
Such applications must be made during the month of May on a regular appli- 
cation form furnished by the Board of Education, and must be approved by 
both the child's classroom teacher and the principal of the school the child is 
now attending. 

All applications will be reviewed at the regular June meeting of the 
Board of Education and pupils and their parents will be informed of the 
action taken on their applications prior to the close of school in June, 1957. 

Sixty colored children applied for transfers to various schools for the Septem- 
ber, 1956, opening, of which fifteen applications were approved and forty-five 
disapproved. The disapproval of the forty-five appHcations, including the 
eleven appellants in these appeals, was in accordance with the Desegregation 
PoHcy of August 1, 1956. 

The committee to study the education needs of atypical children 
in Maryland presented its report to the Board. In commenting on 
the report, ''Special Education of Atypical Children in Maryland," 
Mr. George W. Constable, Chairman, called attention to the fact 
that the State Board, in order to determine what should constitute 
a satisfactory program of education for atypical children in Mary- 
land, directed the Stute Superintendent to appoint a committee to 
work on this problem. Consequently, in September, 1951, the 
Committee to Study the Educational Needs of Atypical Children 
in Maryland was appointed. This Committee was composed of 
twenty-one persons who are either specialists in various types of 
disability, interested parents, representatives of State agencies con- 
nected with special services to atypical children, but served only to 
give information to the Committee. 

The work was divided into three phases, in the following order: 
first, a determination of who the atypical child is; second, a determi- 
nation of what is being done presently in the way of special educa- 
tion; and third, a determination of what should be done. The 
completed report describes every type of atypical child, reports 
upon the institutions now attempting to give some of these children 



Maryland State Department of Education 



39 



some form of education, and makes specific recommendations for 
the proper education of all these children who can profit from any 
type of education. Underlying every recommendation is a philoso- 
phy accepted by the Committee that every child, regardless of his 
condition, is entitled to an educational opportunity commensurate 
with his ability to grasp it. 

Specifically, the Committee found that there are approximately 
58,000 atypical children in Maryland. Included in this group are 
visually-handicapped children, children with speech and hearing 
handicaps, children with other physical handicaps, gifted children, 
mentally-retarded children, maladjusted children, and delinquent 
children. In considering the needs of these atypical children, the 
Committee recommended that Marj^land should strengthen pro- 
grams of teacher education in these special areas, create a top 
caliber professional team to assist in the diagnosis of these disabilities, 
initiate and organize a research and evaluation unit, and give special 
attention to the child who has more than one handicap. In addi- 
tion to these general recommendations, the Committee made specific 
and detailed suggestions in each of the seven categories of atypicality. 
In concluding its report, the Committee expressed the opinion that 
the administration of such a program must of necessity be the re- 
sponsibility of the officials of the public school system, both State 
and local. 

The Board directed the State Superintendent to study this re- 
port and make specific suggestions for implementing the rec- 
ommendations of the Committee, with particular emphasis at this 
time on training of teachers to teach atypical children. (In the 
Board Minutes of May 29, 1957, it was stated that at the direction 
of the Board, the State Superintendent had named a committee 
of the staff of the State Department of Education, under the chair- 
manship of Dr. D. W. Zimmerman, to present proposals for imple- 
menting the report of the Committee to study the needs of atypical 
children in Maryland.) 

February 28, 1957 

The Board's attention was called to the fact that on March 1, 
1957, Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., would begin his sixteenth year as 
State Superintendent of Schools. From January 23, 1942, to March 
1, 1942, Dr. Pullen served as Acting State Superintendent of Schools. 
The State Superintendent expressed his thanks to the present and 
past State Boards for their support of education. 

The Board was advised of the inauguration of Dr. Parlett L. 
Moore as President of Coppin State Teachers College on April 28, 
1957. 

Other Board action included the following: 

1. Approved the new record system of permanent and cumulative 
pupil record forms for use in the public schools. This revision 
was the work of a committee of superintendents, supervisors. 



40 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



principals, and teachers, under the direction of Miss Dorothy 
W. Shires. During the past year the committee had studied 
the adequacy of the existing pupil record forms which had 
been in use in the counties of Maryland for a number of years. 
The committee made certain suggestions for revision in order 
to provide a continuous record of the mental, physical, emo- 
tional, and social growth and development of the pupil during 
the time he is enrolled in public school as well as to facilitate 
certain administrative procedures. The committee recommended 
that the counties introduce the new records for all (new) 
children entering school in September, 1957, or thereafter. 
Copies of the proposed nine cards and tentative edition of the 
"Manual of Instructions for Permanent and Cumulative 
Records," dated September, 1956, were given members of the 
Board. The State Superintendent stated that in approving 
these forms the Board can assume the records will be kept con- 
fidential and will not be released except by order of the court. 

2. Approved the appointment of a medical advisory committee 
of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation for a period of one 
year beginning March 1, in accordance with Section 2.9 of the 
Maryland State plan for Vocational Rehabilitation. The 
function of this committee of 21 persons is to serve in an ad- 
visory capacity to the Division in all matters dealing with its 
program of physical restoration. 

3. Adopted the following policies for a program of sabbatical 
leaves for the State teachers colleges as recommended by the 
State Board Committee on Teachers Colleges: 

I. 

A. Purpose 

1. The primary purpose of a long-range program of sabbatical 
leaves is to increase the value of an instructor to the college 
which may be accomplished by further study, exchange teach- 
ing (either foreign or domestic), research, or other avenue leading 
to professional growth or personal worth to the college. 

B. Duration 

1. Sabbatical leaves may be for one or two semesters at the option 
of the recipient of the leave. If for two semesters, the leave 
may, with the approval of the college president, span the sum- 
mer between semesters. Under no circumstances shall a 
sabbatical leave cover a period of more than two consecutive 
semesters. 

C. Selection and Appointiaent 

1. All benefits, privileges, and opportunities of a person on sab- 
batical leave shall be continued in the same manner as though 
the person were on active duty. This applies to tenure and 
retirement benefits, salary increments, opportunity for pro- 
motion, etc. 

2. The number of persons on leave at any one time shall rest with 
the president of the college. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



41 



3. Seniority shall be considered in the selection of appointees 
for sabbatical leaves and leaves of absence only when the can- 
didates are equally qualified in all other respects. 

4. Written appHcation for a sabbatical leave or leave of absence 
shall be made by the person desiring such leave in time to per- 
mit any adjustment of the teaching schedule which might be 
made necessary by the granting of such leave. The date for 
the submission of applications for leaves shall be not later 
than May 1 and November 1 preceding the semester for which 
leave is desired. 

5. The application for a leave shall be accompanied by a plan in 
writing in which the applicant outHnes the means by which he 
expects to increase his personal worth to the college during 
his period of leave. 

General Provisions 

A. Pay 

1. The recipient of a sabbatical leave shall receive the equivalent 
of full pay for one semester for that leave; this may be in the 
form of full pay for one semester or half pay for two semesters. 

2. Pay for a substitute instructor, if such be needed during the 
period of leave, shall not be deducted from the sabbatical stipend. 

B. Eligibility 

1. An instructor shall be considered eligible for a sabbatical 
leave upon the satisfactory completion of seven years in the 
service of the college from the time of completion of his last 
sabbatical leave. In the computation of the seven years, 
a leave fur military service or for approved professional study 
shall be counted. A person requesting a sabbatical shall have 
been in the teaching service of the college for the year pre- 
ceding the request. 

C. Responsibilities 

1. The recipient of a sabbatical leave must agree to return to the 
service of the college immediately following the completion 
of his leave and to teach for at least two academic years there- 
after. 

2. If the recipient of a sabbatical leave does not comply with the 
above, he shall be held financially responsible for the sabbatical 
stipend — for all of it if he does not return to the service of the 
college at all, and for a proportional part of the stipend depend- 
ing upon the extent to which the recipient of the sabbatical 
shall have completed two academic years of employment by 
the college immediately following the sabbatical. 

3. The estate of the recipient of a sabbatical leave shall not, 
however, be held financially responsible for the sabbatical 
stipend in the event of death during the period of sabbatical 
leave or during the period of obHgated service following such 
leave. 

4. Full-time employment by the recipient of a sabbatical leave 
shall be prohibited. This shall not, however, preclude the 
recipient's accepting grants, fellowships, or remuneration for 
part-time work of any sort which would not interfere with the 
sabbatical project. 



42 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



4. Approved following policies for determining residence within 
the State for purposes of tuition payment at the State teachers 
colleges. These policies, prepared with the assistance of the 
State Law Department, had been recommended by the State 
Board Committee on Teachers Colleges and the college presi- 
dents: 

1. The residence of students who are minors shall be determined by the 
permanent residence of the parents or legal guardians. 

2. In the case of students who have attained their majority but con- 
tinue to reside at home and who are fully or partially supported by 
their parents, residence of the student shall be determined by the 
residence of the parents. 

3. In cases of other students over twenty-one, residence shall be deter- 
mined by the application of the following criteria: 

a. QuaHfication to vote in Maryland 

b. Payment of Maryland State income tax as a resident 

c. Physical presence of person and goods in the State of Maryland 

d. An affidavit of declaration to establish and maintain residence 
in the State of Maryland 

"The residence of a student under twenty-one whose parents maintain sepa- 
rate residences shall be the residence of the parent having custody of the 
child, or if the custody of the child is equally divided between the parents, 
that of the parent who provides the support for the child." (Rewording of 
the fourth policy from Board Minutes of May 29, 1957) 

May 29, 1957 

At the annual meeting of the Board Mr. Wendell D. Allen 
and Mr. Jerome Framptom, Jr., were re-elected President and Vice- 
president, respectively, of the State Board of Education. 

The State Superintendent informed the Board that the U. S. 
Office of Education has requested permission from the State Depart- 
ment of Education to reproduce its recent publication, a curriculum 
guide bulletin entitled Planning for Effective Learning — Science. 
The bulletin will be reprinted as one of the publications in the U. S. 
Office of Education's "Selected Science Services" and distributed 
throughout the countiy. In this series of educational publications, 
outstanding state and local bulletins which have broad appeal and 
usefulness are reproduced for national distribution. Dr. Ellsworth 

5. Obourn, Specialist for Science with the U. S. Office of Education, 
stated in a letter to the State Superintendent of Schools that ''you 
and your committee have developed a basic and sound procedure for 
curriculum-making in science that is as useful in Mississippi, Nevada, 
or New York State, as ic is in Maryland." Dr. Obourn went on to 
say that in his current work with science curriculum groups in 
several other states, the Maryland bulletin is being used as the basis 
for planning. Planning for Effective Learning — Science is one of 
the series of seven curriculum bulletins which were developed at a 
State-wide curriculum workshop which met at State Teachers Col- 
lege at Towson in June, 1955. Mr. George L. Crawford, Super- 
visor of Curriculum, State Department of Education, and Dr. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



43 



George L. Osterwise, High School Supervisor, Montgomery County, 
served as chairmen of the committee for the science bulletin. 

Members of the Board received copies of a report on the 
''Present Status of Public Junior College Development in Mary- 
land,'' prepared by Dr. Harold Reese at the request of the State 
Superintendent. The report states that Maryland attempted to 
meet the increased postwar demands for college education by pro- 
viding State aid for junior college students, and this stimulus pro- 
vided an incentive for the establishment of locally-controlled public 
junior colleges in Baltimore City and in Montgomery and Wash- 
ington counties. In addition, junior college education was provided 
at the State teachers colleges at Frostburg, Salisbury, and Towson. 

The Commission to Study the Needs of Higher Education in 
Maryland presented statistics which show that during the period 
1954-69 the college-age population in Maryland will double and 
recommended "That the establishment of community junior col- 
leges be the first step of a program for meeting the demands that 
cannot be met by expanding existing institutions" and, further, 
that these colleges be located geographically so as to eliminate the 
factor of distance as a deterrent to securing a college eduction. In 
September, 1957, four additional public junior colleges will open 
their doors to provide low-cost college education to the youth of 
Maryland: one in Frederick County, one in Harford County, and 
two in Baltimore County. The report calls attention to the follow- 
ing developments as showing further evidence of implementation 
of the Commission's recommendation to spread these junior col- 
leges throughout the State: 

1. Pursuant to the request in House Resolution 22 (1957), the State De- 
partment of Education is studying the post-high school needs of youth in 
Allegany County. 

2. As a coi5.sequence of passage of House Bill 919, which directs the County 
Commissioners of Charles County to appropriate funds to support a 
public junior college should one be established in that county, a study of 
the post-high school needs in Charles County is being planned with the 
assistance of the State Department of Education. 

3. Definite interest in the possibility of establishing a pubHc junior college 
has been evidenced in Prince George's County. 

4. Montgomery County has discussed the feasibility of establishing an addi- 
tional public junior college in that county. 

5. Baltimore City is planning to transfer its present junior college to sepa- 
rate facilities, which will enable it to double its present enrollment. 

6. Some interest has been shown in the possibihty of joint action by several 
counties to establish a public junior college on the Eastern Shore. 

Members of the Board were invited to a meeting on June 10, 
to plan for a study of State aid to the local school syst -ns. Other 
persons invited to this meeting were certain members the State 
Department of Education, members of the State Board Com- 
mittee on Public Schools, some lay citizens, and Dr. Paul Mort 
of Columbia University. 



44 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



The Board received copies of a "Special Report on Federal 
Financial Assistance to Local School Systems in Maryland." The 
report showed the amount of federal funds distributed to local 
political subdivisions in Maryland during the past few years for 
current expense and for school construction in areas impacted by 
defense and other functions of the Federal Government under 
Public Law 874 and Public Law 874, as amended. 

It was stated that if these current expense funds should be cut 
or eliminated in the curtailment of expenditures by Congress, it 
could be a severe blow to the teachers of the State, since a sub- 
stantial part of these funds is spent for teachers' salaries. This 
concern was based on recent reports of members of Congress to 
decrease or eliminate federal support of education. 

Other action of the Board: 

1. Approved request of Maryland Institute in Baltimore to 
award the degree of Master of Arts. 

2. Approved the recommendation that the State plan for the 
extension of library services to rural areas under Public 
Law 957, Library Services Act (Approved by State Board 
— November 1956) be submitted to the United States Office 
of Education after June 1 for the fiscal year 1957-58. 
Under this arrangement the $40,000 allocation for 1957 
would not be lost but would be added to the regular allot- 
ment due Maryland for 1958. This plan had the approval 
of Dr. L. G. Derthiek, United States Commissioner of 
Education. 

3. Granted permission for the extension of the working rela- 
tionship between the Division of Library Extension of the 
State Department of Education and the American Library 
Association's Library Community Project for the next two 
years. 

4. Adopted the following resolution on the retirement of 
Mrs. Grace Steele Travers: 

Resolution On Mrs. Grace Steele Travers 

Mrs. Grace Steele Travers came to the State Department of Education 
on July 1, 1918, as secretary to the State Superintendent of Schools. 
She served as secretary to Dr. M. Bates Stephens from 1918 until 1920 
and to Dr. Albert S. Cook from 1920 until 1931. She also served as 
statistical clerk in the Bureau of Educational Measurements of the 
Department from 1921 until 1924. In 1925, when the position was 
created, Mrs. Trovers was appointed financial secretary. She continued 
to serve also as Dr. Cook's secretary until 1931, when she was assigned 
full time to her duties as financial secretary. 

As financial secretary, Mrs. Travers was totally responsible for all 
financial records of the State Department of Education, the State 
teachers colleges, and the Teachers' Retirement System. She assisted 
the teachers colleges in setting up their bookkeeping systems and set 
up financial procedures to be followed in the State Department and 
carried them out in a most professional manner. During the summer of 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



1927 Mrs. Travers, Miss Bessie C. Stern, and one or two others worked 
out the details for the organization of the Teachers' Retirement Sys- 
tem, after spending several weeks in New York working with Mr. 
George B. Buck, actuary for the Retirement System. 

In 1943, when the Department had grown to such an extent that one 
person could no longer handle all financial matters, Mrs. Travers' 
position was changed to Principal Account Clerk I, and she served in 
that capacity until the summer of 1955, when she was appointed 
counselor in the Division of Certification and Accreditation. 

In paying special tribute to Mrs. Travers the State Superintendent 
added that in point of service Mrs. Travers is the oldest member of 
the staff of the State Department of Education. 

5. Approved an increase in the tuition rate for junior college 
students at the teachers colleges from $100 to $150 per year, 
effective September, 1957. It was explained that this brings 
the rates at the teachers colleges in line with the prevailing 
rates at the public junior colleges operated by the local 
boards of education. The teachers college presidents have 
approved the recommended increase. 

6. Approved request of Dr. Earle T. Hawkins, President of 
the State Teachers College at Towson, for permission for 
the Towson State Teachers College to carry on a research 
project, in co-operation with sixteen other colleges in the 
country, to determine the reasons why an abnormally large 
number of students complete all registration requirements, 
including the payment of certain fees, and then fail to en- 
roll at the beginning of the fall term. 

7. Authorized the State Teachers College at Towson to offer 
a course leading to the Master's Degree, beginning at such 
time as the President feels the College is prepared for it and 
subject to State Board approval of the curriculum and 
certain administrative procedures. This action was inter- 
preted to mean that such a program could begin the fall 
of 1957. 

8. Recommended that a study be made in the advisability 
and feasibility of operating the five State Teachers colleges 
on a quarter basis to see if the facilities of the colleges 
could not be utilized to a greater extent than at present. 



46 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 

The services of the Division of Certification and Accreditation 
may be reported generally under six broad headings: 

1. Certification of teachers 

2. Accreditation of educational programs 

3. School plant planning 

4. High School equivalence certificates 

5. School lunch program 

6. Teacher recruitment 

The work involving the certification of teachers includes the 
public schools and approved nonpublic schools located within the 
State of Maryland. 

In the accreditation of educational programs several areas are 
considered: higher education; teacher education; Maryland non- 
public academic schools which may enroll pupils from nursery school 
through the secondary school age; and Maryland nonpublic non- 
academic schools which offer instruction in trade and technical 
activities, music, dancing, beauty culture, and similar areas. 

The school plant planning program provides services to the 
public schools of the State, including the teachers colleges. 

High school equivalence provides the means whereby persons 
who have been unable to secure a high school diploma may, on the 
basis of an examination, be issued a certificate which for legal 
purposes is equivalent to high school graduation. 

Administration of the school lunch program at the State level 
involves the distribution of surplus foods, Federal funds for the 
school lunch program, and Federal funds for the special m'Ak pro- 
gram, in accordance with the Federal laws governing such programs. 

The teacher recruitment program was recently established in 
an effort to encourage young people to prepare for teaching and to 
provide information concerning the opportunities and needs for 
placement as teachers, and the need for placement as teachers per- 
sons who have formerly taught or who have good basic preparation 
for teaching. 

Certification 

As will be seen from TABLE 51, page 140, the number of certi- 
ficates issued to teachers, supervisors, and administrators increased 
from 3,654 in 1955-56 to 4,481 in 1956-57. More certificates were 
issued to elementary teachers and to high school teachers than in the 
preceding year. In 1956-57 che number of certificates for ele- 
mentary teaching issued exceeded the number issued the previous 
year by 593, and the excess of 1956-57 over 1955-56 in high school 
certificates issued was 108. 

The number of emergency certificates issued in 1956-57 shows 
an increase over the number issued the previous year. Therefore 
the number of emergency certificates in eff'ect continues to remain 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



at a relatively high level of approximately 30 per cent. The picture 
is brightened by the fact that approximately 59 per cent of the 
emergency and substitute certificates have been issued to applicants 
who have graduated from college but have engaged in no recent 
formal study or who lack some of the necessary professional or 
academic preparation required for full certification. Such teachers 
have excellent background and may, with comparatively little 
effort, qualify for regular certificates. Furthermore, many of the 
teachers who were issued provisional certificates had previously held 
regular certificates but had failed to qualify for their renewal. 



Section 20 of Article 77, of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 
1951 edition, provides that, with certain exceptions, nonpublic 
schools may operate in Maryland only if they are approved by the 
State Superintendent. (See the Eighty-fourth Annual Report of 
the Maryland State Board of Education, page 21. ) While the law 
exempts from its provision schools operated by bona fide church 
organizations, it has been the custom of the State Superintendent 
to approve on a voluntary basis colleges and secondary schools con- 
ducted by church groups. 

Institutions of Higher Learning 

The institutions of higher learning, many of which have State 
charters, have requested and received approval as follows: 



These figures have changed but very little since last year, there be- 
ing no change in the number of colleges and universities, schools of 
nursing, or separate professional schools. Four additional public 
junior colleges have been added to the list of junior colleges. 

The Supervisor cf Teacher and Higher Education represented 
the Department in the evaluation of two institutions by the Middle 
States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. In each 
case the institution involved was being re-examined by the IMiddle 
States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. The first 
of these was St. Joseph College; Emmitsburg; the second was 
Loyola College, Baltimore. 

Requests for approval and degree-granting privileges for Villa 
Julie Junior College, Stevenson, Maryland, and the Maryland 
Institute, Baltimore, were also studied and recommended for ap- 
proval. Such action was taken by the State Board of Education. 

Another important activity of the Division, involving institu- 
tions of higher learning, consisted of work with the county adminis- 
trators in developing community college programs at Frederick, 
Bel Air, Essex, and Catonsville. 



Accreditation 



Colleges and universities 

Junior colleges 

Schools of nursing 

Separate professional schools. 



22 
17 
19 

8 



48 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



State Teachers Colleges 

For a number of years the Department has depended upon 
student-teacher ratio to estimate how many instructors might be 
justified in budget requests for the teachers colleges. The State 
Supervisor of Teacher and Higher Education subsequently developed 
a formula which, following its acceptance by the presidents of the 
teachers colleges and by the subcommittee of the State Board of 
Trustees, is currently under consideration by the budget bureau. 

The following steps were taken to arrive at a workable formula: 

a. All five colleges agreed upon certain desirable yet practicable 
section sizes. 

b. All five colleges agreed upon a certain standard faculty load 
which included credit for many of the extra assignments for 
which college faculty members usually are responsible. 

c. Utilizing actual data provided by the five colleges for four con- 
secutive semesters and guided by a formula which is currently 
in use in California, a new formula was developed empirically. 

To apply the formula a particular college must estimate its 
enrollment and the number of sections of each course it would have 
to schedule following the previously agreed upon desirable section 
sizes. Although the formula has been utilized in actual practice 
by the teachers colleges in arriving at estimates of faculty staffing, 
the budget bureau has not yet accepted it in principle. However, 
the formula has had a beneficial effect at the colleges through its 
provisions of a device for scheduling courses at all five colleges 
according to section sizes which were determined to insure better 
instruction. 

Junior Colleges 

A Study of Desirability of Planning Public Education Beyond 
High School in Allegany County was undertaken by the Maryland 
State Department of Education at the request of the Maryland 
Senate and the House of Delegates which at their 1957 session en- 
acted companion resolutions^ calling upon the State Board of 
Education to cause a study to be made of the post high school needs 
of the youth in Allegany County. 

Increased interest in extending post high school educational 
opportunities for the youth of Allegany County has been evidenced 
on the part of a number of civic-minded groups during the past year. 
This interest has spread into the neighboring counties. Various 
service organizations, school and government officials, and the 
State Board of Education were subsequently solicited for support. 
As a result of interest shown by the State Senator and members of 
the House of Delegates from Allegany County, Senate Resolution 22 
and House Resolution 16 were passed requesting "the State Board 
of Education to study the desirability of planning public education 



1 House Roaolulion No. 22, Allegany C^ounty Delectation, and Senate Resolution No. 16, Senator 
f'barles M. See, Annapolis, Maryland, February 1, 1957. 



Maryland State Department of Education 49 

beyond high school for deserving youths in Allegany County to 
equip them for technical employment in industry located in that 
community." 

Completed in October, 1957, the study was distributed to the 
members of the Maryland General Assembly and to a number of 
other interested groups in the State. The following recommenda- 
tions were made: 

1. A two-year cummunity- junior college should be established in 
the City of Cumberland under the control of the Board of Edu- 
cation of Allegany County. 

2. Both terminal and transfer programs should be offered in any 
public community-junior college which may be established in 
Allegany County. 

■ 3. The program in the proposed public community- junior college 
should include courses similar to those in the teacher training 
program in the first two years at the State Teachers College 
at Frostburg. This should facilitate transfer to that institution 
at the end of two years. 

4. As soon as practicable, steps should be taken to bring together 
representatives of the Board of County Commissioners of Alle- 
gany County, the Allegany County Board of Education, and 
the State Board of Education to implement the recommenda- 
tions presented in this study. 

5. Further investigation should be made to determine the feasi- 
bility of offering extension courses in Cumberland to satisfy 
existing needs of business and industry. 

Academic Schools Below College Level 

The number and kind of academic schools below college level 
which were operating in the State in 1956-57 and had been ap- 
proved by the Department were as follows: 



Tyye of School Njnvber 

Secondary.. 44 

Secondary-Elementary 8 

Secondary-Elementary-Kindergarten 1 

Secondary-Elementary-Kindergarten-Nursery School 1 

Tutoring 8 

Special 11 

Elementary 4 

Elementary-Kindergarten 5 

Elementary-Kindergarten-Nursery School 5 

Primary 1 

Primary-Kindergarten 6 

Primary-Kindergarten-Nursery School 4 

Kindergarten 34 

Kindergarten-Nursery School 24 

Nursery School 33 

Total 189 



Secondary Schools 

The Assistant Director in the Division of Instruction and the 
Supervisor of High Schools, in the Department of Education, have 
the responsibility of visiting and evaluating nonpublic secondary 



50 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



schools in Maryland. Each of these officials visits the schools in 
his regular territory. On the list of nonpublic secondary schools so 
approved are 53 regular secondary schools and eight tutoring schools. 
Of these 61 schools, 38 are church-operated and 23 are privately 
operated. Of the 38 church schools, 34 are operated under the 
auspices of the Roman Catholic Church; three are Hebrew schools; 
and one is a Presbyterian school. In addition to the schools oper- 
ating in Maryland under the control of bona fide religious organiza- 
tions, there are nonpublic schools which have charters from the 
Maryland Assembly and which are exempt from the approval re- 
quirements. Any of these institutions may request approval of the 
State Superintendent of Schools at its discretion. 

Each approved school submits a fall report during the month 
of November, and, prior to the visit to these schools by members 
of this Department, the schools' reports and teacher certification 
status are reviewed. In connection with the visits to the individual 
schools, a conference is arranged with the principal, in which the 
school organization and administration, including general policies, 
course offerings, and graduation requirements are discussed. The 
staff qualifications, class load, special assignments, and teaching 
competency are considered important aspects of the State require- 
ments for approval. 

Many of the nonpublic schools have operated over a long period 
of time and few new secondary schools have been established recently. 
From time to time, a church-operated school or a private school 
operating under a charter, which had not been previously approved 
by this Department, will ask for and receive approval. There are 
no nonpublic secondary schools on the State-approved list in ten 
counties: Calvert, Caroline, Dorchester, Garrett, Harford, Kent, 
Somerset, Talbot, Wicomico, and Worcester. 

The three new secondary schools added during the year are 
Bais Yaakov School for Girls, Baltimore; Mechina High School, 
Baltimore; and the Cardinal Gibbons High School, Ridge, Mary- 
land. 

Elementary Schools, Kindergarten, Primary Schools, and Nursery Schools 

These schools may be classfiied in the following way: 



Co-operatives with parents participating 30 

Co-operatives administered by parents who do not 

participate daily 15 

Small centers (three groups or less) owned by individuals. .. 50 
Larger centers (more than three groups) owned by indi- 
viduals 13 

Schools governed oy Board of Directors 27 

Church-operated centers 4 

Other groups (sponsored by housing projects, civic groups, 

colleges, etc.) 13 

Total 152 



In the nursery school-kindergarten classification there are 22 
centers which operate long hours to care for the children of working 



MAR'i'LAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



51 



ing parents. In some of these centers the program, which is called 
"school," differs very little from a day-care program. Four of 
these centers agreed this year to return their certificates and to be 
known as day nurseries rather than as schools. Each of these four 
centers is in an area where it must be licensed by local health 
authorities to operate even a day-care center. 

Enrollments in the nonpublic elementary and preschool cen- 
ters during the two years 1955-56 and 1956-57, including new schools 
approved during each of these years, were as follows: 



Type of School Enrollment 

1955-56 1956-57 

Number of children in nursery schools 2,244 2,286 

Number of children in kindergartens 2,220 2,513 

Number of children in elementary schools 3,526 3,469 

Number of children in special schools 443 431 



Total 8,433 8,699 



The greatest increase in enrollment was found in the number 
of children attending nonpublic kindergartens. A slight decrease 
is noted in the number of children attending nonpublic elementary 
schools and in the number of children attending special schools. 
The decrease in the number of children attending special schools 
may be due to the fact that some of the counties have opened new 
centers for handicapped children. 

Twenty applications for approval of nonpublic schools below 
the secondary school level were received. Of these applications 13 
was approved and seven were denied approval. Six of the seven 
which did not secure certificates of approval were co-operatively 
sponsored centers for five-year-olds. One was a private center set 
up specifically as a play group for children in a rural area. 

Not all schools were visited this year. Some centers were visited 
more than once Priority in visiting was given to schools applying 
for approval; schools approved the previous year; schools requesting 
visits; schools about which complaints were received; schools for 
which the information given on the annual report indicated a need 
for visitation; and schools whose standards have been under question 
for a considerable period of time. 

With the help of the Division of Library Extension, a kit of 
books for preschool children was prepared for loan to centers wishing 
to use it with parent and teacher groups. 

Nonpublic Nonacademic Schools 

During the 1956-57 school year, 25 additional nonpublic non- 
academic schools were approved and received certificates from the 
State Superintendent. The schools belong in the following cate- 
gories: 

Barber Art 
Business education Dance 
Trade and technical areas Hair designing 

Music 



52 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



As of June 30, 1957, there were 189 trade and technical schools 
which were operating and met the conditions for rpproval under 
Section 20 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 1951 
edition. In addition to the 189 schools approved, 26 schools held 
tentative approval, pending the application of recommendations 
made by the Department, or pending the securing of additional 
information concerning the faculty or the owner. 

When a new application is considered for approval in areas in 
which expert knowledge is not available to staff members of this 
Department, consultants are secured. During the past year con- 
sultants have been employed in the fields of art, music, electronics, 
flight training, and nuclear power plant operation. In most cases 
the services of these consultants were utilized for one- or two-day 
periods only. 

Staff members worked closely with the representatives of the 
Civil Aeronautics Administration and the Post Office Inspection 
Division, in connection with programs offered by flight schools and 
correspondence schools, respectively. 

The advice and assistance of various other State boards of 
examiners have been sought frequently, and on several occasions 
joint visits were made by the respective boards and the supervisory 
staff in this Division. 

Numerous meetings have also been held with the investigating 
staff of the Better Business Bureau for the purpose of investigating 
complaints with regard to questionable advertising practices and 
questionable procedures in business management. The Veterans 
Administration and the Better Business Bureau have also been of 
assistance in a review of other complaints concerning the quality of 
instruction at certain schools. 

In addition to 25 new programs given regular approval, 15 
programs of instruction had been reviewed and given tentative 
approval, with the assumption that regular approval would follow 
upon the achievement of certain requirements not yet full met. 

Nine trade or technical schools closed during the academic 

year. 

Approval for Veterans' Training 

A special responsibility of the Division of Certification and 
Accreditation is the approval of schools for veterans' training. As 
of June 30, 1957, there were 64 trade and technical schools which 
had been approved for offering instruction to veterans under Public 
Laws 346 and 550 and under Public Law 550 alone. 

Resident or extension courses offered by 38 institutions of 
higher learning were approved for veterans, as were six residencies 
and internships provided by hospitals and medical schools and 
seven curricula for the training of registered nurses. A few non- 
public secondary schools were also approved for veterans' training. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



53 



School Plant Planning 

The work of this section of the Division is concerned with all 
phases of school plant planning, in both the elementary and second- 
ary schools of the State, as well as with the five State teachers col- 
leges. 

The Public School Laws of Maryland require the approval of 
the State Superintendent of Schools for all purchase or sale of school 
sites, plans and specifications of school buildings, and for all con- 
tracts and change orders on school construction. During the past 
year, the following have been examined and recommended for 
approval: 

Preliminary Final Deeds, Right- Change 

Site Plans Plans Contracts of- ways, etc. Orders 

115 101 92 89 46 27 

In addition, the supervisor spent much time working with 
superintendents and architects in developing programs of long-range 
planning, as well as working on functional planning of specific 
buildings. One field trip was organized for the inspection and 
evaluation of new buildings with over one hundred superintendents, 
architects, and engineers in attendance. 

The supervisor continued to work with the presidents of the 
State teachers colleges and other State agencies in the development 
of the Capital Improvement Program at the various teachers 
colleges. All phases of the work, from the preparation of the 
Capital Budget to the final inspection of the completed building, 
were covered. Twenty-five sets of plans, 52 contracts, and 28 
change orders were recommended for approval during the past year. 

High School Equivalence 

The Maryland General Assembly of 1941 authorized the State 
Board of Education to administer examinations leading to the 
Maryland Certificate of High School Equivalence, which "shall be 
the legal equivalent of a high school diploma and which in addition 
shall be accepted as meeting the State requirements of a high school 
education for admission to the study of the various professions and 
vocations." 

This legislation was passed in order to enable persons who had 
left school before high school graduation to secure certain promo- 
tions in State and Federal work and to enter certain professional 
programs of study. The intent of the legislation was not to provide 
an education but merely to offer a means by which past educational 
experiences may be evaluated. 

In October of 1941, the first series of examinations was ad- 
rninistered. The program now operates with the General Educa- 
tion Development Tests serving almost entirely as the examining 
device. Eight official testing centers have been established in 



54 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



Maryland, and the examinations are offered each month on the sec- 
ond and third Saturdays. 

During 1956-57 a Certificate of High School Equivalence was 
issued to 1,694 candidates. A total of 1,603 applicants completed 
the examinations offered by the State Department of Education, 
1,600 of whom took the comprehensive examination as provided 
by the General Education Development Tests, and three completed 
subject-matter tests. There were 1,207 first-time applicants, of 
whom 808 or 66.4 per cent earned the certificate on the first exami- 
nation; 383 applicants were retested, and 144 of these or 37.6 were 
successful on the second test. Two of the three applicants taking 
the subject examinations received certificates. In addition, certi- 
ficates were awarded to 740 armed forces personnel and veterans 
who had qualified through the United States Armed Forces In- 
stitute examinations, which had been taken while in service. 

In the 16 years since the establishment of the equivalence pro- 
gram, 16,628 applicants have earned the certificate. On the basis 
of this achievement, a number of individuals have been admitted 
to college and earned degrees. Many have secured promotions or 
employment heretofore denied them, and others who took the ex- 
aminations for purely personal satisfaction have been stimulated to 
pursue courses in special fields or to develop broader avocational 
interests. 

Teacher Recruitment 

The State Supervisor of Teacher Education continued his 
efforts to help the school systems of the State obtain an adequate 
supply of qualified teachers. Schools throughout the State were 
visited and the supervisor spoke to groups of students and to meet- 
ings of parents and teachers. The student groups were made aware 
of the unique employment advantages in the teaching profession 
and the excellent opportunities for employment and growth in the 
field of education. The parent-teacher groups were kept informed 
of the critical teacher supply-and-demand situation and were en- 
couraged to think seriously of education as a professional career 
for their own children. 

In addition, conferences were held with the guidance counselors 
and the principals in each of the schools visited, to provide an inter- 
change of data on teacher recruitment and potential sources of 
supply. Counselors were thoroughly briefed on the current State- 
wide salary schedules, employment opportunity trends, and teacher- 
education scholarship information. 

One of the major projects initiated was a study of all the 
graduates of all the teacher-preparation institutions, public and 
nonpublic, in the State. This study, which revealed the ultimate 
employment status of each graduate, was made in connection with 
the annual National Education Association teacher supply and de- 
mand survey. The study showed that of the 914 June, 1956, grad- 
uates qualified for teaching certificates 771 or 84.3 per cent par- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



55 



ticipated in the follow-up. Of these 771 graduates from whom in- 
formation was received, 589 or 76.4 per cent stated that they were 
teaching as of November 1, 1956. Five hundred twenty-six of the 
persons entering teaching or 89.3 per cent, indicated that they were 
teaching in Maryland. Although 24 per cent of the graduates did 
not accept teaching positions, the percentage of loss was probably 
lower than the figures indicate, since several of the reasons given 
for not entering the teaching profession are of the type which would 
seem to indicate that the graduate was only temporarily or involun- 
tarily pursuing some other occupation or activity. 

An illustrated recruiting bulletin entitled Opportunities Un- 
limited! was prepared for distribution to high school students in 
September of 1957. This publication is designed to acquaint high 
school boys and girls with the advantages of teaching as a pro- 
fessional career and to help attract capable young people into the 
profession. 



I 



56 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



DIVISION OF INSTRUCTION 

The services of the Division of Instruction to the schools of 
Maryland during the school year ending June 30, 1957, may be 
reported under eight general areas: 

1. Supervisory assistance to the counties, and to individual schools, in 
school organization and administration 

2. Aid and consultative service in curriculum development and in super- 
vision of the instructional program 

3. Development and improvement of materials of instruction 

4. Services to school libraries 

5. Pupil personnel and parent education services 

6. Services to special education and institutional programs 

7. Special studies and programs initiated or assisted by the members of 
the Division 

8. Administration of the Teacher Education Scholarship Program 



Supervisory Assistance to the Counties, and to Individual 
Schools, in School Organization and Administration 

There were two groups of professional persons with whom the 
general State supervisors had direct leadership training responsi- 
bilities this year — the supervisors of high and elementary schools 
in the counties and the principals of the schools. Before World 
War II the State supervisors of high schools visited and consulted 
directly with the classroom teachers. With the large growth of 
schools in the post-war period, and with the introduction of high 
school supervision in all the counties, the emphasis has necessarily 
shifted to consultant services to the administrative and super- 
visory personnel in the counties. 

The elementary principals' group is growing in number. There 
are more than 800 elementary principals, and of this number about 
400 are supervising principals. Seventy-two of these principals 
are in charge of both the elementary and high in a combined school 
organization. The high schools are growing in size — the median 
enrollment last year was 569 pupils. Of the 199 high schools, 12 were 
organized as grades 10-12 senior high, 12 as grades 9-12 high schools, 
112 as grades 7-12 junior-senior high, 40 as grades 7-9 junior high, 
and 23 with grades 7 and 8, or grade 7 only. The latter schools, 
grades 7 only, were combined with the local elementary schools. 

One of the most significant aspects of the leadership programs 
is the series of State-wide conferences for supervisory and ad- 
ministrative personnel. The annual meeting of elementary and 
high school supervisors had as its theme: "Supervision in Mary- 
land, A Co-operative Enterprise." The annual meeting of high 
school principals centered around the general topic: 'The High 
School Meets the Challenge of Swelling Enrollments and Critical 
Personnel Problems." 

Last year the elementary school principals asked for a meeting 
sponsored by the State Department of Education. This con- 
ference, co-operatively planned, was held in Baltimore on September 



Maryland State Department of Education 



57 



27 and 28, 1956. The theme was: "Community Study in the In- 
Service Education of Teachers." 

General Supervision — Elementary Schools 

For the school year 1955-56 there were 80 general elementary 
supervisors employed in the counties. This does not include super- 
vision of art, music, and physical education. The median number 
of years of experience in supervision was 8 years, with a range 
from 1 to 36 years. The median age was 49 years with a range 
from 32 to 67 years. Of this number 6 were new to supervision this 
year. 

All counties were visited this year. These visits were for rnany 
different purposes: to visit schools with supervisors and principals 
to observe classroom instruction; to help county staffs plan revisions 
in curriculum; to discuss general and specific problems in supervision; 
to participate in meetings and workshops as speaker or consultant; 
to observe and assist in new programs, such as television in Wash- 
ington County, camping in Frederick County, making a guide for 
evaluating schools in Baltimore County, evaluating an elementary 
school in Harford County. 

General Supervision — High Schools 

All of the counties were visited for many different purposes and 
programs. One of the more important was the co-operative visits 
with supervisors and principals in analyzing classroom instruction 
and planning in-service programs for the continued improvement of 
the teaching and learning programs. 

Last year much of the emphasis dealt with the quality and 
extent of the science and mathematics offerings in the senior high 
schools. These classes revealed a high degree of interest on the 
part of many pupils and a high level of teaching competence on the 
part of many teachers. This was especially true in the situations 
where a supervisor of science or mathematics was available for class- 
room consultation. 

Other visits to the counties included conferences with superin- 
tendents and supervisors concerning local school organization, ad- 
ministration, and instruction, as well as specific aspects of the pro- 
gram — new plant facilities, guidance services, subject offerings, and 
accelerated programs. 

Other visits included participation in county-wide workshops 
or institutes; conferences with schools which were preparing for 
evaluation by the Middle States Association of Secondary Schools 
and Colleges; consulting with committees engaged in special curri- 
cular projects. 

A New Approach 

In December, 1956, a new position was created in the Division 
of Instruction, carrying the title of Supervisor of Instruction. 



58 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



There were two significant purposes in connection with the duties 
involved in this position: 

1. Responsibility was designated for the co-ordination of the instruc- 
tional program in grades one through twelve. This co-ordination 
would include both the improvement of instruction and the de- 
velopment of the curriculum. 

2. ResponsibiHty was to be centrahzed for the supervision of guidance 
as part of the total school program. 

The response in the counties to this assignment across grade 
levels was immediate and favorable. It was felt that there would 
be value in such leadership, not only in planning for pupil orientation 
and guidance, but also in the areas of curriculum, instruction, and 
development of teacher co-ordination and understanding. 

The supervisor spent the major part of the year in county situa- 
tions, in becoming more familiar with the varied programs and 
problems, and in sharing with other counties the significant contri- 
butions of each. Especially emphasized was the participation in 
county workshops, institutes, staff meetings, and regional and 
State-wide conferences. 



Aid and Consultative Service in Curriculum Development 
AND IN School Organization and Administration 

The assistance in this area stresses two related services: (1) 
school and classroom visitation and conferences, and (2) participa- 
tion in curriculum workshops as in-service programs. All of the 
23 counties were visited with regard to the first of these two areas, 
and 16 counties for the second area. Most of the workshops and 
institutes in curriculum development in recent years have been 
concerned with instructional materials for grades 1-12. This 
articulation of materials across the total grade organization is a 
particularly healthy aspect of education development and seems 
destined to continue to expand. 

While many of these workshops have centered around materials 
for Social Studi^.s and Language Arts, increasing emphasis is noted 
in the redesigning of programs in all phases of science and mathe- 
matics. In addition to these areas just noted, workshops have 
concerned themselves with Home Economics, Foreign Languages, 
Home and Family Living, Health and Physical Education, and 
Driver Education. 

Supplementing the various efforts to improve the materials of 
instruction have been the related studies centered on such programs 
as: special classes for the gifted pupils, improving instruction for 
the slow-learners, making arithmetic more meaningful, the ex- 
panded use of audio-visual materials, and reading for meaning in 
the content subjects. 

While no State-wide meeting in Language Arts was held last 
year, the State Department of Education continued to encourage 



Maryland State Department of Education 



59 



counties to give in-service education in this area by assisting in 
consultant service in long-term programs in several counties. 

Several examples are given here to illustrate some of the 
activities in the general curriculum development-improvementlof 
instruction area: 

1. The arithmetic programs are being carefully scrutinized in many 
workshops. Several supervisors have asked for consultant help 
in revising these programs. 

2. There is concern about the social studies and science programs in 
the elementary schools. Should they be separate or combined 
programs? 

3. Many of the counties are intensifying the programs in literature 
and individualized reading programs. School libraries are grow- 
ing, which indicates increased attention to pupil interests, knowl- 
edge, and skills. 

4. There is a continued increased attention to writing, not only to 
penmanship and readability but to general skills in composition 
and expression. 

5. The counties are experimenting with new programs — the use of 
television, outdoor education in the upper elementary grades, 
foreign language in the elementary grades, guidance, music and 
art specialists in the elementary schools, and school time for cur- 
riculum revision programs. 

6. There is much use being made of the 1955 Towson Workshop cur- 
riculum bulletins. They have served as the bases for many meet- 
ings as study material and later as the guides for specific curriculum 
production laboratories. 

7. Supervisors and principals are continuing to study methods of co- 
ordination and co-operation in the improvement of classroom 
instruction. 



Health and Physical Education 

Emphasis has continued to be placed on the improvement of 
health and physical education programs in all of the schools, both 
high and elementary. The State Supervisor has visited nearly all 
of the counties during the year and has been especially helpful in 
nine counties which requested specific recommendations for revising 
their programs. 

A very successful "Eastern Shore Physical Education Workshop 
for Secondary Schools" was conducted at the Wicomico High School. 
Some 55 physical education teachers, supervisors, nurses, and county 
health officers participated. Similar workshops are being planned 
on a regional basis for other parts of the State. 

Frederick County inaugurated a camping program for sixth- 
grade classes. Two classes have each been provided with a one- 
week camping experience at Mount Catoctin Park. The program 
was very successful and endorsed by the parents. At least one 
other county is planning a similar opportunity for its pupils for 
1957-58. 



60 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



With the assistance of an advisor}^ committee and a steering 
committee, a Teacher Training Workshop in Outdoor Education 
has been planned for October of 1957. Frederick County has 
agreed to be the host in co-operation with the State Department of 
Education and other State agencies. 

In addition to his regular duties in the area of physical educa- 
tion, the State Supervisor is Executive Secretary of the Maryland 
Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association. This organization 
is responsible for the total program of athletic contests in Maryland. 
The healthy status of this program is due not only to the full assist- 
ance of coaches and principals but also to the excellent support of 
the superintendents and their county staffs. The athletic programs 
are designed to be an integral part of the educational offerings and 
as such are under the direction of those responsible for the total 
instructional program. 

With approval of all concerned, the annual State Girls' Volley- 
ball Sports Day usually held at the University of Maryland was 
discontinued this year. It was felt that the project had grown too 
large and unwieldy and that better purposes and more girls would 
be served if similar sports days were held at regional levels. 

The annual State Girls' Sports Day held at Morgan State Col- 
lege is developing into an exemplary project for county girls' athletic 
programs. Social and recreational objectives take precedence over 
former objectives to provide opportunities in athletic competition. 

The growth of a nucleus group of women physical education 
leaders has been encouraged to foster the development of a State- 
wide Girls' Athletic Association, the purpose of which will be to 
promote and emphasize the values of a broad intramural program. 
It is likely such an organization will be formed in the coming year. 

Each year a ''Financial and Statistical Analysis" of the annual 
State Basketball Tournament, operated by the M.P.S.S.A.A. is 
prepared and distributed. This ''Analysis" provides a public 
record of the administration of a considerable financial enterprise. 

Under the same supervisor the Driver Education program has 
continued to expand slowly. In 1951-52 there were 3,532 pupils 
in the program. In 1956-57 this number had grown to 8,446. In- 
cluding Baltimore City, 103 high schools offered behind-the-wheel 
instruction, while 14 other high schools offered classroom-only in- 
struction. The cost per pupil in 1956-57 for the program including 
either behind-the-whtiel and classroom-only instruction was $42.03 
per pupil. This figure does not include operational costs. For 
1956-57 these operational costs were $279.15 per driver-education 
automobile. 

Next year the supervision of the driver education program will 
be transferred to another supervisor in order to distribute better 
the several duties of the two persons involved. Under the leader- 
ship of these two supervisors a Driver Education Workshop was 



Maryland State Department of Education 



61 



organized and carried out for the purpose of developing a needed 
course of study. The first draft of the outHne of the course will be 
revised at a second workshop to be held in the summer of 1958. 
The com.pleted outline is scheduled for printing late in 1958. 

Development and Improvement of Materials of Instruction 

In the development of curriculum materials the Division has 
been active in some five areas: 

1. The development of curriculum guides, in co-operation with State- 
wide committees in the several subject areas. These are not 
courses of study but lend themselves to the building of such 
courses at the county level. 

2. Serving as consultants, and providing additional consultant serv- 
ices, to the counties as they develop their own courses of study 
and related curriculum materials. 

3. The development of basic resource material, especially in the gen- 
eral field of conservation. 

4. The organizing of the State Film Library and the distribution of 
audio-visual materials to schools and adult groups in Maryland. 

5. The construction of Lists I and II of Instructional and Professional 
Materials for distribution to the local boards of education, school 
principals, supervisors, teachers colleges, and libraries. Some 
69,202 pieces of material which were developed by our State 
agencies were ordered from the two Hsts. This does not include 
the individual orders of Baltimore City and Baltimore County 
which were secured directly from the different agencies. 

The supervisors spend a considerable amount of time in revising 
and editing the various curriculum bulletins which were developed 
in the Towson Curriculum Workshop. The following bulletins 
have now been printed and distributed: Foundations for Public 
Education in Maryland; Mathematics; Language Arts; Social Studies; 
Science; Home Economics; Health, Safety, and Physical Education. 
Agriculture, Special Needs of Children, and Music were mimeographed 
and distributed. The bulletin, Special Needs of Children, which 
was used experiment? lly in certain situations, will be revised and 
printed in 1957-58. A State committee has worked all year in 
developing a music bulletin from the Towson Workshop bulletin 
and the Frostburg Music Workshop of 1956. It is hoped that 
this bulletin will be ready for the printer by June, 1958. Industrial 
Arts is being used experimentally in pilot situations. 

The Towson W^orkshop bulletin. Art, has been mimeographed 
and is ready for distribution. It is the general feeling of the group 
editing the bulletin, Planning, Grouping, and Evaluating, that it 
cannot be distributed until additional work has been done on the 
three areas included in the title. It is planned to rework this 
bulletin in 1957-58. 

Arrangements were made with the printer to hold the plates of 
each bulletin so that additional copies could be ordered by the coun- 
ties. Large quantities of additional copies of the following bulletins 



62 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



have been ordered: Foundations for Public Education in Maryland, 
Mathematics, Language Arts, Science, Social Studies. In 1957-58 
opportunities will be given to the counties to order additional 
copies of the other curriculum bulletins. 

In co-operation with the personnel from Baltimore City — Dr. 
Harry Bard, Miss Elizabeth Deussen, Miss Mary Adams, elementary 
and secondary pupils, teachers, and supervisors — volume 24 of the 
Maryland Picture Portfolio Series entitled ''Living in Baltimore 
City" was developed. The "Pictorial Maryland Collection" 
consisting of individual pictures and scripts was enlarged to include 
a section on Baltimore City. A new colored Kodachrome filmstrip 
entitled "Living in Baltimore City" was made and distributed. 

At the present time the Division is working with a committee 
of the Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers to produce a 
colored Kodachrome filmstrip and recording, "Maryland, My Mary- 
land." 

The general conservation bulletin, This Is Our Wealth, which 
gives an overview of the entire area of conservation was edited and 
given to the printer in August, 1956. The bulletin will be released 
by the printer by the middle of September, 1957. The staff has 
worked all year on the rewriting of the factual draft of the bulletin 
on minerals. 

The two conservation bulletins that have been published, 
Maryland's Sunken Treasure and Our Underwater Farm, are being 
reprinted again by the printer and are continuing to be ordered in 
large quantities by schools in Maryland and elsewhere. 

A meeting of the State Audio- Visual Committee was held to 
criticize and make suggestions for the improvement of the audio- 
visual questionnaire which was constructed to give a complete 
picture of audio-visual education in Maryland. The questionnaire 
will be revised and distributed to the local school systems and 
teachers colleges. 

A three-day State Audio-Visual Preview was held with rep- 
resentatives from the State Department of Education, State Audio- 
Visual Committee, and the local school systems attending. Twenty- 
nine films and six filmstrips were selected for purchase. The State 
Film Library continues to grow in service to the adult and school 
groups in Maryland. 

The script was completed this year for the set of colored slides 
depicting a functional program of education at the Kitzmiller school 
(grades 1-12). Projects showing good teaching practices in the 
areas of "mining" and "making maple sugar" were started in Gar- 
rett County. 

In January, 1957, a questionnaire was sent to all the counties 
pertaining to the use of the monthly prints of "The News Magazine 
of the Screen" which are supplied each month to the high schools 



Maryland State Department of Education 



63 



in the State by the Baltimore Sunpapers. The findings of the 
questionnaire revealed that due to the limited number of prints the 
counties were having difficulties in using the news films properly. 
A summary of the findings was sent to Mr. Bruce Earnest, Publicity 
Manager of the Sunpapers, with the hope that the number of news 
films would be increased. 

Beginning with the August, 1957, issue, the Sunpapers will 
supply the State with 24 prints instead of 11. This means that in 
addition to the monthly print which the State Film Library will 
acquire, each county in Maryland will receive each month its own 
copy of 'The News Magazine of the Screen'' to circulate among its 
own schools and to keep as a permanent possession in its film library 

The Baltimore News-Post is sponsoring Current Affairs Film- 
strips in Baltimore City and in the junior and senior high schools of 
Baltimore, Harford, and Anne Arundel counties. According to 
the plan, a filmstrip was sent each month free of charge directly to 
the principal of each high school in Baltimore City and these three 
counties and remained as permanent property of the school. The 
schools will evaluate the news filmstrips and if they have proven to be 
successful, the Baltimore News-Post hopes to be able to extend the 
filmstrip service to the other counties in the State. 

Services to School Libraries 

The report of the State Supervisor of School and Children's 
Libraries is included in the section on Division of Library Extension 
even though she works closely with the Division of Instruction and 
correlates her work with that of the Supervisor of Instruction. 

Pupil Personnel and Parent Education Services 

The program of pupil personnel services was established ten 
years ago by legislation. For many years the problems of attendance 
or extreme behavior necessitating court action were the only ones 
which were referred to pupil personnel workers by the schools. 
The area of pupil personnel work in 1956-57 has broadened, and 
schools and communities have made increased demands on the serv- 
ices of the workers. Pupils who present signs of poor adjustment 
and are not receiving maximum benefits of education are referred 
to supervisors and visiting teachers earlier so that help can be given 
before the problem is too difficult to solve. Increased emphasis on 
early detection of symptoms of maladjustment needs to be stressed 
in the elementary schools. Most counties report that more persons 
are needed on the staff if good casework is to be done. Limited 
times does not permit the workers to handle all of the cases which 
are referred or to do the follow-up work with pupils and families. 

Larger counties are quite concerned with those pupils — boys in 
particular — who are fourteen and fifteen years of age and are not 
benefiting from school because of ability and poor attitude. These 



64 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



pupils are quite disturbing to teachers and prevent others from 
learning by their behavior. Many of these boys are on probation 
from the courts but continue to defy school regulations. More 
counseling services and special programs are needed for this group. 
Teachers also need help in knowing how to teach and understand 
these boys. 

The importance of increasing the holding power of the second- 
ary school was emphasized at the annual conference of pupil per- 
sonnel workers. These drop-outs need additional counseling serv- 
ices and families need to be helped in understanding the importance 
of a high school education in today's world. The emotionally dis- 
turbed child was also discussed at the conference, with the help of 
specialists from other agencies. 

Pupil personnel workers in various parts of the State assumed 
the responsibility of serving on the various committees of the 
Governor's Commission for the Prevention and Treatment of 
Juvenile Delinquency. The State Supervisor served as chairman 
of the Committee on Education in this Commission. The most 
important recommendation of this Committee was to suggest that 
special services to children be increased. An evaluation of the 
present services should be made in order to determine which services 
(pupil personnel, guidance, psychological) need to be increased. 

General 

The committee appointed in 1955 to study and revise cumula- 
tive records completed the cards and the Manual of Instructions in 
tentative form in the fall of 1956. These forms and mimeographed 
manuals were sent to all of the boards of education in the counties, 
teachers colleges. University of Maryland, and other interested 
persons for their evaluation. The suggestions and comments which 
were received were studied carefully by the committee. The final 
forms of the cards were adopted and approved by the State Board 
of Education in February, 1957. The series of cards will record 
data about attendance, school subjects and achievement, activities 
in school and community, work experiences, test data, health pro- 
gress, physical examinations, kind and severity of physical and /or 
mental handicap, and vision and hearing test results. All records 
will include the complete record from kindergarten or grade one 
through grade twelve. The boards of education order and pur- 
chase the number of record cards needed and the State Department 
of Education supplies the Manual of Instructions in printed form to 
all supervisors, prinr^ipals, and teachers. In-service training with 
teachers who will use the cards is important and essential. 

Parent Education 

Discussion groups to help parents understand the growth and 
development of children were organized in eleven counties in 1956-57. 
About 1,700 parents participated in 100 such groups. Lay persons 
served as leaders and supervisors of pupil personnel organized ma- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



65 



terials (plays, films, and pamphlets) for the groups. Consultant 
service from the Institute for Child Study, University of Maryland, 
was furnished to these groups in the various counties through funds 
in this Department. Parents reported that they gained under- 
standing of the behavior of their children as well as themselves when 
they participated in these group discussions. 

Plans were made with one county, Allegany, to organize a more 
structured program for parents. Instead of depending on their own 
interests, they hope to explore one area of influence on a child's life — 
the peer group. This county also plans to pay lay leaders of these 
groups who will be trained by consultants from the Institute for 
Child Study. Financial help is needed if this program is to be 
extended. 

Services to Special Education and to Institutional Programs 

Activities in the area of special education, while all designed to 
help the exceptional child to obtain a general education, may be 
classified as follows: 

General 

The "Report of the Committee to Study Special Education in 
Maryland" was published in February, 1957. Copies were distri- 
buted to all local school systems in Maryland, to P.T.A. groups, to 
colleges and universities, to members of the Legislature, to State 
agencies and departments, to libraries, to chief state school officers, 
and to interested laymen. A second printing was authorized to 
take care of future requests. 

The Report was based on individual subcommittee reports 
which were assembled and re-evaluated during the year. These 
are to be published in 1957-58. 

The State Federation of the International Council for Ex- 
ceptional Children, now in its second year, held an annual meeting 
at Rosewood State Training School in April, 1957. The purpose of 
the organization is to promote the professional growth of teachers 
by giving them contacts with each other and with outstanding lead- 
ers in the country. This group was represented at the national 
meeting in Pittsburgh. 

Services to Schools 

A committee of special education personnel from local depart- 
ments of education studied certification requirements of teachers of 
all types of exceptional children and formulated a set of require- 
ments for consideration by the superintendents' committee on 
certification. No action has yet been taken by the superintendents. 

The speech and hearing therapists again held two meetings 
during the year. The fall meeting was sponsored jointly by the 
therapists and the Department of Speech Pathology of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. The University served as host, explaining 
various aspects of its services but emphasizing programs for brain- 



66 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



injured and stuttering children. The spring meeting, held at The 
Johns Hopkins Hosiptal, featured the team approach in the diagnosis, 
treatment, and rehabilitation of children with cleft palates. Both 
meetings were very helpful in advancing the professional knowledge 
and understanding of the therapists. 

During the course of the year, the Maryland General Assembly 
passed into law a bill authorizing the expenditure of no less than 
$250,000 a year for the education of handicapped children of pre- 
school age. No appropriation was made, but a resolution was passed 
asking this Department to study the implications of the law and to 
report to the legislative assembly by December 31 what the program 
would be in terms of personnel, children, and money. The local 
supervisors of special education have been interested in this develop- 
ment and have been assisting this Department in formulating the 
standards under which the proposed program will operate. Four 
meetings have already been devoted to this and other meetings 
are planned. 

The Supervisor of Special Education co-operated with the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in planning for an extension course on the 
Eastern Shore and served as consultant to the University in plan- 
ning for the employment of a professor of special education. The 
University will increase its offerings for teachers of exceptional 
children. 

Services to Children 

The annual census of handicapped children was taken, just as it 
was last year. An attempt was made to correlate the code with the 
new cumulative record form which has been adopted in the coun- 
ties. 

Special programs for exceptional children have increased in the 
county school systems. Four counties — Charles, Howard, Somerset, 
and Talbot — organized special classes for mentally retarded children 
for the first time in the last eight years. Only five counties have no 
such special classes — Frederick, Garrett, Kent, Queen Anne's, and 
St. Mary's. All other counties have either increased their services 
or are planning to do so. 

The programs of State aid in attending special schools and of 
home and hospital instruction (in the counties) served at least as 
many children as had been served in the previous year. 

The largest program for exceptional children in the Maryland 
counties is the program for mentally retarded children, both educable 
and trainable. This program served 2,200 children in 149 special 
classes. Supervisors and teachers have endeavored to improve 
methods of diagnosis and teaching, but the lack of qualified psycholo- 
gists and teachers remains one of the big problems in developing 
these services to the extent that they should be developed. 

Other children for whom the counties would like to improve 
their services are the multihandicapped, the brain-injured, and the 



Maryland State Department of Education 



67 



gifted. The recently published report, Special Education of Atypical 
Children in Maryland, contains recommendations in these and all 
areas, and plans are now being made to implement these rec- 
ommendations. 

Special Education — Institutions 

In a further recognition of its educational obligation to all the 
children in the State, the Department, at the beginning of this year 
added the position of Supervisor of Special Education for Institu- 
tions to the staff of the Division of Instruction. While the service 
to be provided by this office is available to adult institutions oper- 
ating educational programs, it is especially intended for those which 
are serving children. The training schools for juvenile delinquents 
constitute a prime example. The need for assistance of this type 
has been increasingly apparent in recent years and has been par- 
ticularly sought by the State Department of Public Welfare which 
has the responsibility for the operation of the aforementioned train- 
ing schools. During the 1956 fiscal year, 2,050 children were re- 
ceived by these schools from the courts of the State, and present 
indications are that this number is likely to increase markedly in the 
next ten years. The problem of developing and administering cur- 
ricula and programs suitable for the peculiar needs of these schools, 
together with the necessity for a close working relationships and an 
atmosphere of mutual understanding between the training schools 
and the public schools, is indicative of the complex nature of this 
area of operation. 

Services to the Training Schools 

The initial portion of this year was devoted to a preliminary 
I study of and orientation to the field. This included a view of past 
developments, visitation to the institutions, and some research 
into the general area of institutional philosophy and administraton. 
Through a contmuing series of formal and informal conferences, 
1 contacts and working relationships have been established with a 
! wide variety of persons concerned with this subject. These include 
appropriate personnel in the Welfare Department; administrators, 
teachers, and others in each of the training schools; superintendents, 
supervisors, and principals in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, and Prince 
George's counties and with the same personnel in Baltimore City; 
consultant personnel in the Children's Bureau of the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Health, Education, and Welfare; institutional personnel 
in other states; and, finally, with the many members of this De- 
partment who have worked in this area from time to time. The 
ji degree of interest and co-operation encountered through this activity 
' has been and should continue to be most rewarding. The inclusion 
of training school staff members in appropriate professional activi- 
ties of the public school systems within which their institutions are 
situated is one illustration of this point. 

The problem of enlisting and retaining adequately trained per- 
sonnel is not exclusively that of the training schools, but it is none- 



68 



XixETY-FiRST Annual Report 



theless a critical matter for them. In this vein and at the request of 
the Welfare Department and the training school superintendents, a 
study was made of the salary situation relating to educational 
personnel in these institutions, and a report and some recommenda- 
tions were turned over to them in January. Another study concern- 
ing the classification of vocational instructors is now in progress, and 
a report will be submitted to the Welfare Department and to the 
office of the State Commissioner of Personnel. 

Professional service to teachers was provided during the year 
through a series of four two-day workshops for all academic in- 
structors. Dr. Marjorie S. Johnson, Director of the Temple Uni- 
versity Reading Clinic, served as consultant for all of these meet- 
ings and was well received by the participants. An additional, 
though indirect ser\ice, was pro\ided through an arrangement 
whereby the directors of education of the four schools met together 
on a monthly basis for the purposes of discussion among themselves 
and with others relating to professional matters. Hopefully, the 
most significant ser\ice to teachers was in the form of a one-week 
workshop held in June and attended by representatives of the four 
training schools and the Welfare Department. In these meetings, 
efforts were made to analyze and clarify jointly the needs of de- 
linquent children and to use this knowledge for the development of a 
meaningful philosophy of education having general acceptance in 
all four institutions concerned. This operation was \iewed as an 
essential preliminary to the development of the curricula and 
teaching techniques which, according to present plans, should occur 
in additional workshops during this and succeeding years. While 
the active participation of all members of the workshop group was 
emphasized, considerable stimulus was provided through consultant 
ser\ice by the State Department of Education staff and by I\Ir. J. 
Donald Coldren, Executive Director of Berkshire Industrial Farm 
School, Canaan, New York. 

During the year, the Super\'isor of Special Education for 
Institutions has also been called upon by the Welfare Department for 
consultations relating to physical facilities of an educational nature, 
both present and planned, in the institutions under its charge. 

Services to Other State Institutions 

While the services of the Supervisor have been on call to all 
state institutions, it is already apparent that the active interest of 
the Department of Public Welfare has resulted in a concentration 
of effort on educational activities under its direction. During the 
year, however, two visits were made to the Rosewood State Training 
School (Department of ^Mental Hygiene* and one each to the 
Penitentiary and the Reformatory for IMales (both under the De- 
partment of Correction). A profes.sional staff was enlisted to con- 
duct the annual teacher training institute at the Penitentiary and 
some assistance was given the director of education in planning the 
program. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



69 



Other Activities 

In addition to participation in the various meetings and con- 
ferences sponsored by the Department during the year, the Super- 
visor took part in workshops held in Calvert and Frederick coun- 
ties and served as a member of the State committee to revise pupil 
records. Service was also performed as a member of the Institu- 
tions Committee of the Governor's Commission on Juvenile De- 
linquency. 

Problems for Further Study 

Programs for the education, treatment, and rehabilitation of 
delinquent children and adult offenders seem to be very much in the 
experimental stage in Maryland and across the country. There 
are many problems and very few tested and proven solutions. In 
Maryland, however, it is most encouraging to note an increasing 
degree of genuine interest in the entire matter which should contri- 
bute markedly to the rate of progress able to be achieved. 

Study should continue on problems of personnel, curriculum, 
physical facilities, and co-ordination with other educational opera- 
tions in the State. Perhaps the fundamental consideration in any 
answers to these problems, however, lies in the administration and 
supervision of these institutions or of their educational programs, at 
least. The decision as to the proper authority and method for 
exercising this responsibility is still in doubt. As an alternative 
to the present arrangement, it has been suggested that control be 
shifted to one of the following agencies: 

1. The public school systems of the counties in which the institutions 
are physically located 

2. Another state agency such as the State Department of Education 

3. An entirely new state agency having the operation of training 
schools -IS its sole responsibiHty 

The answer to this problem is of paramount importance and is 
therefore deserving of continued and comprehensive study. 

Special Studies and Programs 

The Child Study Program 

The child study program has been an in-service program for 
the teachers in the State for eleven years. The total number of 
participants in the program last year was 854 in 16 counties. 

For the first time the State Department of Education did not 
sponsor meetings for leaders for the program but did assist in the 
payment for consultant services in ten counties: Allegany, Anne 
Arundel, Calvert, Charles, Harford, Howard, Prince George's, 
Queen Anne's, Somerset, and Wicomico. 

As an outgrowth of the meetings with Dr. Daniel A. Prescott, 
of the University of Maryland, with the superintendents in Easton 



70 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



in April, 1955, and with school board members in November, 1956, 
the State Superintendent of Schools appointed a committee to study 
the entire program and present recommendations for its future. 
This committee is studying the relation of the child study program 
to the total in-service education of teachers, including the need for 
increased attention to the study of the community as a basis for 
better techniques for understanding the children in the classrooms. 

With the growing number of total teachers and pupils and the 
increases in the numbers of new teachers, there is more need than 
ever for a deeper understanding of the factors that influence children's 
growth and development. 

The counsel of the Director of the Division of Instruction has 
largely influenced the relating of community study and child study 
as inseparable factors in the total understanding of human growth 
and development. This philosophical influence is being translated 
into reality through speakers and consultants for State-wide and 
local meetings, and the drafting of a tentative program of action 
for the consideration of the State Superintendent and the school 
superintendents. 

Business Curricula 

As noted in the report of last year, the State Committee on 
Business Curricula, consisting of members of the Division of In- 
struction and representative teachers and supervisors in this field, 
prepared three questionaires designed to secure current data con- 
cerning the organization, administration, and content of high school 
business curricula. These instruments have been summarized and 
the results will provide the basis for continued study by the com- 
mittee this year. This study, which should lead to a revision of 
practices in business education, will be summarized in a bulletin 
to be printed and distributed in 1958. 

A Study of Mathematics and Science Offerings 

One of the State high school supervisors made a study of en- 
rollment trends and offerings in science and mathematics in the 
Maryland county high schools. 

In view of much widespread and sometimes misleading informa- 
tion being circulated today regarding the lack of course offerings in 
these fields, the true situation in the Maryland counties is both re- 
vealing and assuring. Although there are still many relatively 
small high schools in the rural areas of the State, practically all 
our schools offer the basic algebra, geometry, and chemistry courses. 
Physics is offered in 90 per cent of our schools and trigonometry in 
62 per cent. 

More significant than the relatively small percentage of schools 
not offering the basic mathematics and science courses is the much 
smaller percentage of the total high school enrollment to which these 
courses are not available On this basis, the total high school 



Maryland State Department of Education 



71 



enrollment in grades 9-12 is 70,677 pupils. The enrollment of all 
schools offering Algebra I is 70,197 or 99.3 per cent of the total 
enrollment. Likewise in grades 10-12, with a total enrollment of 
47,644 in the county high schools, the following subjects are avail- 
able as indicated: 

Biology — 100 per cent 
Chemistry — 99.5 per cent 
Plane geometry — 98.6 per cent 
Algebra II — 97.2 per cent 
Physics — 96.6 per cent 

The obvious conclusion is that opportunities to enroll in the 
basic science and mathematics courses are available to all but a 
very small number of our county high school students. As school 
consolidation continues and enrollments increase, this number 
will be further reduced. Likewise, additional offerings will be 
possible. 

The Teacher Education Scholarship Program 

The 1956 General Assembly of Maryland established a scholar- 
ship program for the purpose of attracting additional young people 
to the teaching profession. No funds were appropriated to imple- 
ment this program. The 1957 General Assembly declined a pro- 
posed amendment to this law and approved the budget in which 
the Governor had made provision for funds for these scholarships. 

Pursuant to these actions, the State Department of Education 
announced its plans for the administration of the program. Rep- 
resentatives of the tseveral colleges eligible to receive students on 
these scholarships met at the State Department of Education and 
agreed on the testing program designed to select students for the 
awards. 

To facilitate test administration at the local level, 24 test 
centers were designated, one in each county and in Baltimore City, 
in co-operation with the superintendents of schools. The superin- 
tendents arranged the facilities for these centers, under the direction 
of competent test supervisors. 

While the test procedures were not new, since the local boards 
of education have as a matter of courtesy to the colleges and to this 
Department administered these tests each year for the Senatorial 
and other State scholarships, the consolidation of the two programs 
involved considerable planning and detailed arrangements. Al- 
though the same test was used and each applicant had the privilege 
of making himself eligible for both types of scholarships, the test 
results of candidates for the Teacher Education scholarships were 
specifically the responsibility of this Department. 

In order to get an estimate of the test volume and to determine 
eligibility for taking the test, application forms were provided every 
high school in the State, both public and nonpublic, with the request 
that the principal collect applications for all candidates and forward 
them to this Department. However, since it was ruled that high 



72 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



school graduates prior to the current year were eHgible, appHcants 
were als6 admitted, without prior appHcation, on the test date. As 
the figures below indicate, the number actually taking the test was 
far below the number of applicants registered and anticipated. 

Total test volume provided for 24 centers, based on prior 

registration plus 10 per cent 2,072 

Number of applicants actually tested — includes both 

Teacher Education and Senatorial scholarship appHcants 1,370 

There seems to be no clear-cut reason for the disparity in the 
above figures. In a few counties the number tested very closely 
approached the number anticipated while in many areas, including 
the Baltimore City districts, the number tested was only 50 to 60 
per cent of anticipated volume. 

The tests were given in the 24 local centers on Saturday, April 
13, 1957. After the results were tabulated and checked, the win- 
ners were notified by the State Superintendent of Schools. This 
notification included a statement of conditions under which the 
scholarship certificate would be awarded, a request that the winner 
accept or decline the award, and a form for a notarized statement 
concerning the residence of the parent. 

A number of those who were offered scholarships did not accept 
them. In these cases the next person on the eligible list of that 
district was offered the award. According to the provisions of the 
law, when the eligible list of any district was exhausted, the awards 
were filled from a State- wide hst, in which all of the 562 names 
were listed in rank order. Forty-five scholarship awards were 
made from this State-wide list. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



73 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

The primary function of the Division of Library Extension is to 
furnish leadership in developing good library service for all the 
people in the counties of the State by public libraries, school libraries, 
and libraries in the State institutions. The second function is to 
lend materials to libraries when they have requests which the local 
libraries cannot cover satisfactorily and to individuals in areas 
without public libraries. 

Seventy thousand seven hundred six books, periodicals, and 
audio-visual materials were lent by the Division to libraries and 
individuals in the counties. The percentage of loans follow: 

65% to the 14 county libraries including schools and colleges 

in these counties 
9% to municipal libraries 
18% to schools and colleges in counties without county 

libraries 

2% to individuals in counties without public libraries 

2% to State hospitals and institutions 

4% to members of the State Department of Education 

100% 

The books lent were about 40 per cent for adults and 60 per 
cent for children. Loans for one month accounted for a third of all 
materials. These are sent in answer to requests for titles or subjects 
needed by the libraries because of special reader requests for ma- 
terials not in the library, with a few to individuals not served by 
public libraries. Proportions of these were: 71 per cent adult non- 
fiction, 14 per cent adult fiction, and 15 per cent juvenile. 

Long loans of collections of one hundred books or more are made 
to the county libraries for one year and to small public libraries and 
schools in counties without county libraries for four months. More 
than one-third of all loans fall in this group. Their proportions 
were: 8 per cent adult nonfiction, 8 per cent adult fiction, and 84 
per cent juvenile. 

Exhibits accounted for about a fourth of all loans. These 
were circulated to the local boards of education and contained seven 
times as many children's books as those for adults. This exhibit 
was also shown at the annual convention of the Maryland Congress 
of Parents and Teachers. 

Films of interest to adults with subject emphasis on interna- 
tional understanding, intercultural relations, the arts, and com- 
munity and civic responsibility have been added to the collection 
as well as films from children's stories. 



74 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



Publications distributed to libraries and interested citizens 
during the' year included: 

1956 Supplement to Audio-Visual Catalog 195I4. 
Maryland Libraries 1955-56, mimeographed 

Proposal for Maryland Plan for Public Libraries Under Public 
Law 597, Library Services Act (mimeographed) approved by Mary- 
land State Board of Education at its regular meeting on November 
28, 1956 

Nine New County Libraries — Our Goal, a reprint from the Mary- 
land Parent-Teacher, February, 1957, outlining the State plan for 
rural library extension under the Library Services Act 

Special Recommendations for Equal Opportunity for Public Library 
Services in All Communities throughout the State of Maryland 
(mimeographed), approved by the Maryland State Board of 
Education at its regular meeting on November 28, 1956 

Maryland Public Library Statistical Report, a new form for the 
annual report of the public libraries 



Public Libraries 

The 14 county libraries continued to grow in service with in- 
creases in book stock, library buildings, and new bookmobiles. 
Nine counties continue not to have county-wide library service. 

Library Statistics for the 14 Counties with County- wide Library 
Systems: 1956-57, 1955-56, 5 Years Ago, and the Year Before 
State Aid Was Paid 

1956-57 1955-56 1951-52 1915-1,6 



Book stock $ 907,124 

Use 4,668,695 

Operating support 1,418,797 

Local operating support 1,263,578 

State aid 155,219 



$ 820,909 $ 529,520 $247,806 

4,299,773 2,314,720 761,351 

1,130,206 679,656 1 57,017 

975,987 643,170 157,017 

155,219 36,486 



The counties with established county libraries which receive 
State aid are: Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Cecil, Charles, Garrett, 
Harford, Howard, Montgomery, Prince George's, Queen Anne's, 
St. Mary's, Talbot, Washington, and Wicomico. The Enoch Pratt 
Free Library of Baltimore received $113,965 in State aid in 1956-57. 
Statistics for Baltimore City are not included in the above. 

Book stock in these counties made an increase of 10 per cent 
over one year earlier and 70 per cent in five years. It is more than 
three times as large as it was in the last year. 

Use increased about nine per cent over the previous year and 
is twice as much as five years earlier, and six times as much as in 
the last year before State aid was paid. 

Operating support increased about 26 per cent over the previous 
year, more than two times in the five-year period, and was nine 
times larger than in the year before State aid was paid. 

Local operating support went above $1,000,000 for the first 
year. It increased 29 per cent over the previous year, 96 per cent 



Maryland State Department of Education 



75 



in the five-year period and was eight times as large as in the year 
before State aid was paid. 

State aid is about one-ninth of the operating support of the 
county Hbraries. It did not increase over the past year, but is 
four times as larges as five years earher. It began to be paid as 
of July 1, 1946. 

Library Statistics for the Nine Counties without County-wide 
Library Systems: 1956-57, 1955-56, Five Years Ago, and the 
Year before State Aid Was Paid 



Book stock 

Use 

Operating support. 



1956-57 1955-56 

$166,353 $131,285 

429,086 389,327 

87,327 83,996 



1951-52 191^5-^6 

$ 89,440 $ 96,256 

290,853 236,994 

59,409 35,539 



Much appreciation is felt for the work of the citizens who have 
maintained libraries over many years in the small communities, but 
very little increase has been achieved in the libraries of Allegany, 
Caroline, Carroll, Dorchester, Frederick, Kent, Somerset, and 
Worcester counties except in the cities of Cumberland, Frederick, 
and Westminster. These city libraries combined have 57 per cent 
of the book stock, 80 per cent of the use, and 89 per cent of the 
operating support for libraries in these counties. Calvery County 
has no public library. 

The county libraries are making good progress. It is the 
Maryland goal that each of the counties establish a county library 
so that books and informational materials may be available through- 
out the county by branch libraries and bookmobiles. The county 
libraries do not have enough books or librarians to guide their use, 
nor enough support to develop the kind of library service for which 
the people are asking. Their incomes range from a low of 64 cents 
per capita, a median of 92 cents, and a high of $2.68 as computed on 
the 1950 cens'is, though it is well known that the 1957 population 
far exceeds that of the latest decennial census, particularly in the 
metropolitan areas near Baltimore and Washington. The Enoch 
Pratt Free Library had $2.49 per capita with which to give library 
service to the people of Baltimore City. 

The Rockinghorse Library as a part of a new elementary school 
building was added as a new branch of the Montgomery County 
Department of Public Libraries. The Baltimore County Public 
Library closed its branches at Sparrows Point and in the Banneker 
School in Catonsville but added a second bookmobile which operates 
out of the Essex Library. The Prince George's County Memorial 
Library added its third bookmobile, and Washington and Wicomico 
counties each replaced bookmobiles with new ones. 

In Montgomery County the Silver Spring Library moved to a 
fine new building on Colesville Road, and an addition to the Garrett 
Park Community House was built for the library. The Baltimore 
County Library leased a building which was built according to its 
plans for the Towson Public Library branch on the first floor and 



76 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



County Library headquarters on the second floor. The bookmobile 
service which was formerly housed in Pikesville was moved to the 
County Library headquarters. Harford County built a very 
attractive and efficient branch at Aberdeen and secured a building 
as government surplus property on the west side of Havre de Grace 
where the county library operates the Concord Fields Library. Half 
of the new community building of Rising Sun is the com- 
munity library, a branch of the Cecil County Library. 

A study of library needs in Baltimore County was begun in the 
fall of 1956 by the staff of the Baltimore County Public Library with 
Dr. Lowell A. Martin, Dean of the Graduate School of Library Serv- 
ice, Rutgers University, as chief consultant. 

The State Superintendent of Schools called two meetings of 
the county librarians on September 5 and May 23. The agenda 
for discussion included the Maryland plan for the use of the federal 
appropriation for the extension of library services in rural areas; 
the activities of the State Department of Education in developing 
proposed library legislation; the requirement that all employees of 
the county libraries be members of the Retirement System; tenure 
and social security; progress reports of the Library-Community 
Projects; and budgets, records, reports, and audits. 

The luncheon guest speaker, on May 23, was Mr. George E. 
Snyder, President of the Junior Chamber of Commerce of Mary- 
land. He talked about the organization's program, ''Operation 
Library." The president-elect, Mr. Jay Fitzgerald, was also a 
guest. 

The Library-Community Project In Maryland 

Maryland's second year of participation in the American 
Library Association's Library-Community Project has been one of 
intensive community study in the pilot library area of Wicomico 
County and, on a State-wide level, a series of workshops, committee 
planning meetings, and the initiation of local library activities in 
the development of the informal adult education services of public 
libraries. 

The Wicomico County Library, through the participation of 
staff, library board members, and citizen committees, has surveyed 
the governmental agencies and the groups and organizations in the 
county. Through these discussions had grown a closer working 
relationship between the library and the organization and an under- 
standing of work in which the library and the agencies may co- 
operate in more effective provision of adult education services and 
materials. Meetings with a number of citizen groups throughout 
the county have provided the library with valuable information on 
the county and on the needs and interest of its adult population. 
Community representatives and other leaders were interviewed 
concerning community problems and needs. Census data and 
other printed materials on the county have been analyzed. Numer- 
ous conferences have been held with the library staff, Maryland 



MARYLAND State Department of Education 



77 



project director, American Library Association Consultant, and 
library board members to discuss plans for future library services 
which would be a vital contribution to the adult education and civic 
activities in the county. During the year the library has purchased 
additional books and other materials in such areas as: aging popu- 
lation, farm problems, leadership training, helps for programs. The 
library has established an additional staff position for work with 
adult groups and agencies but, due to the acute shortage of librari- 
ans, this position has not been filled. The library's program for 
next year will emphasize its services to organization leaders, to 
other adult education agencies, and to the general public. They will 
seek constantly to promote the use of significant materials on com- 
munity problems and current affairs and to provide special reading 
lists, exhibits, and programs in these and other areas. A full report 
is in preparation on the process and the findings of the study. 

Through an arrangement between the American Library Asso- 
ciation and the Sociology Department of the University of Maryland, 
a special research study was undertaken in two rural areas of 
Wicomico County. The study attempts to determine both the 
formal and informal social organizational patterns of adults in these 
areas, their interests and activities, their actual and potential use 
of reading materials, and their knowledge and use of public library 
services. Intensive interviews with individuals and agencies have 
formed the basis for the data. Dr. Wayne Rohrer and Dr. Margaret 
Gussler of the University have supervised and administered the 
study. A graduate student has conducted most of the field work. 
The report of the study will be available in the fall. It should pro- 
vide further insight into needed library services in the rural areas of 
Wicomico County. 

Several significant activities characterized the State-level aspect 
of the Library-Community Project. Seven American Heritage 
discussion groups were formed in public libraries and one in a 
veteran's hospital in Maryland. Cecil, Prince George's, and Talbot 
County libraries, the Davis Library in Westminster, three branches 
of the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, and the Perry Point 
Veterans Administration Hospital Library participated in the pro- 
gram. A two-day program of leadership training for lay leaders 
and librarians was provided in October, 1956, by Mr. Robert E. Lee 
from the American Library Association. The Division of Library 
Extension furnished the books and other materials for the dis- 
cussion groups, assisted local libraries in planning and selecting ma- 
terials, and gave general supervision and guidance to the program. 
The topics covered a wide range of current and historical problems, 
such as: Foreign Policy, the Middle East, Propaganda, the United 
Nations, Freedom of Speech, Conservation, Problems of the Schools. 
About 130 individuals were active members of the local groups. 
Other public libraries have expressed a desire to initiate such study- 
discussion groups next year, and the present groups are planning 
to continue the program. 



78 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



Two workshops for public librarians were held during the year. 
In December, 1956, a workshop on ''Community Study'' at the 
Hotel Stafford was attended by some 35 librarians. Dr. Dan Dod- 
son. New York University Center for Human Relations, was the 
principal speaker and consultant. Others were: Dr. Wayne 
Rohrer, University of Maryland, Mr. A. L. Fleming, Salisbury 
State Teachers College, and Miss Eleanor Phinney, American 
Library Association. A committee of public librarians assisted 
in planning the conference and participated in the program. 

"Use of Films in Adult Programming'' was the theme of a 
second two-day workshop in March, 1957. Miss Violet Myers, 
Head of the Films Department at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 
was chairman of a program committee of public librarians. Mrs. 
Muriel Javelin, Boston Public Library, was consultant. 

The series of meetings on library adult education have proved 
of value in heightening awareness of the library's role in serving 
adults, in stimulating interest in improved adult services, and in 
giving specific techniques and skills in how such services may be 
developed. 

As a result, some libraries are planning to undertake certain 
aspects of community study, some are providing more information 
and guidance in films for adult programs and are planning local 
film previews for group leaders. 

This year the Division of Library Extension added substantially 
to its collection of films for adult groups, partly through funds pro- 
vided by the Library-Community Project. Committees of librarians 
previewed and selected films. Films for possible purchase were 
shown also at the Maryland Library Association conference and at 
the film workshop. The Division of Library Extension is indebted 
to the Films Department of the Enoch Pratt Free Library for con- 
tinuing consultant help and for the use of their facilities for the film 
showings. 

The two-year Project in the four states has been extended for 
another year by ^he American Library Association. Maryland 
libraries have benefited greatly by their participation in the Project. 
The staffs have been encouraged and stimulated by continuing 
contacts with the American Library Association's Staff of the 
Library-Community Project and by the high professional skills 
and understanding they have brought to bear on the Maryland 
projects. It is believed that they have resulted in improved library 
techniques and services and will serve as a stimulus to continuous 
study in this area of public library service. 

Library Services Act 

The Library Services Act became law in June, 1956, and Con- 
gress appropriated $2,050,000 for the year 1956-57, or $40,000 for each 
State. The "Proposal for the Marvland Plan for Public Libraries 



Maryland State Department of Education 



79 



Under Public Law 597, Library Services Act" was approved by 
the Maryland State Board of Education at its regular meeting on 
November 28, 1956. The proposal made federal money available 
to county libraries established under State law which would work 
with neighboring counties to develop mutually agreeable forms of 
co-operation and co-ordination of public library services in areas 
with a potential population of 75,000 people. The Division of 
Library Extension agreed to transfer as many as 10,000 books from 
its collection to book pools established to serve two or more coun- 
ties. Three areas were chosen for first effort. They were (1) 
Somerset, Wicomico, and Worcester, (2) Calvert, Charles, and St. 
Mary's; and (3) Allegany and Garrett, with other groups to be 
considered if these did not participate. 

The Maryland Plan covering these proposals was submitted to 
the Office of Education and contacts were made with officials in the 
counties chosen for first effort. The counties which did not have 
established county libraries in these three areas did not establish 
them. Because it was too late in the year to expend the money 
in other areas, the Maryland Plan was withdrawn and the available 
$40,000 was reserved for future years. 

Policies for A Minimum Program for County Public Libraries 

The State Board of Education approved "Special Recommenda- 
tions for Equal Opportunity for Public Library Services in All 
Communities throughout the State of Maryland" at its regular 
meeting on November 28, 1956. These recommendations recognize 
that several factors play equally important parts and it is imperative 
that they be included in a well-rounded program meeting the needs 
of public library services in the State. These factors are: (a) 
adequacy of trained personnel; (b) adequacy of supply and types 
of books; (c) functionally designed library buildings, and (d) book- 
mobiles to carry public library services to the more remote rural 
areas. 

Legislation will be required to make available additional funds 
for the further extension of public library services to all the areas 
of the State. Its purpose would be to distribute equally State funds 
on a local basis to all the political subdivisions of the State. The 
program should be developed with the principle in mind that every 
citizen of the State should have at least a minimum program of 
library service available, regardless of place of residence. (For 
suggested legislative program see Board Minutes of November 28, 
1956.) 

State Incentive Fund for Financing Purchase of Land and Buildings for 
Libraries on a 25-Year Serial Bond Basis at a 3 Per Cent Interest Rate 

Lack of buildings is jeopardizing effective operation in almost 
all of the counties of the State. It is proposed to use the following 
plan for financing buildings to be used for library services by having 
the counties and Baltimore City sell 25-year bonds at approximately 
a 3 per cent interest rate. 



80 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



The basis for this Hbrary building incentive fund is a per capita 
cost of building based on population in the counties and Baltimore 
City. It is recommended that this cost be 25 cents per capita for 
adequate functional buildings. Such bonds should be financed from 
an incentive fund supported from two sources: 

1. an additional one-half cent on the local tax rate for each county 
and Baltimore City, which would create a revenue which should be 

2. supplemented by an incentive fund from State aid, the total of 
the two sources being equal to 25 cents per capita. 

This program would require several years for completion, but 
if the local counties were guaranteed this source of revenue, they 
could begin immediately to take option on or purchase sites before 
there is an excessive increase in land values in desirable locations. 

It is recommended that this State incentive fund for the 
financing of the purchase of lands and buildings be used to assist the 
program for the extension of equal library services to all the coun- 
ties of the State. 

Bills for the minimum program for county public libraries 
(including the Enoch Pratt Free Library of Baltimore) and for in- 
centive funds for library buildings were introduced in the closing 
days of the 1957 General Assembly, but were without action. 

The citizens of Maryland are interested in good public library 
service and the additional financial aid as outlined in the minimum 
program should lay the foundation for another 10-year program of 
development and extension of library services to every community 
throughout the State of Maryland, regardless of its location. 

It is definitely understood that in this plan the minimum num- 
ber of employees recognized for State aid and a minimum salary 
scale would not prevent any county, or Baltimore City, from hav- 
ing a larger staff and paying salaries beyond the minimum, pro- 
vided such additional funds were obtained from local tax funds, or 
the equivalent. 

The ratio of one library employee to each 9,000 population is 
acceptable to establish an equalization procedure in financing the 
program of public library services throughout the State. It allows 
for a much smaller number of library employees than the standards 
as established for good current library practices. 

A long-term program would require further consideration as 
follows: 

1. After two fiscal years the ratio of library employees to population 
should be reduced to one employee for each 6,000 population and 
the local tax rate should be increased to 3 cents per $100 assess- 
ment or its equivalent. 

2. After the two following fiscal years the ratio of library employees 
to population should be reduced to one employee for each 3,000 
population, and the local tax rate should be increased to 3.5 cents 
per $100 assessment or its equivalent. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



81 



Libraries in State Institutions 

Library service in State institutions has been handicapped by 
lack of professional librarians. In the State tuberculosis hospitals 
the professional librarians have resigned for various personal rea- 
sons and to date there have been no qualified applicants for these 
positions. Library service in two State mental hospitals has been 
maintained by volunteers under the guidance of the hospital Re- 
habilitation Department. There are no professional librarians in 
the State mental hospitals except the director of medical libraries. 

The Maryland Training School for Boys has plans for a library 
in the remodeling of the present school quarters. At the request of 
the School, the Supervisor of County and Institutional Libraries 
with the co-operation of Mr. Thomas W. Pyles, Miss Mae Graham, 
and Miss Elizabeth D. Hodges, Supervisor of School Librarians in 
Baltimore County, prepared plans for the library quarters and a 
budget for necessary books and other materials. A strong rec- 
ommendation was made for a qualified librarian to administer the 
proposed library. 

The institutions continue to look to the Division of Library 
Extension for the provision of books in special areas. Most of the 
libraries have no funds provided through the institution budget for 
purchase of books and other library materials. There is a continu- 
ing need for the development of adequate libraries within the 
institutions themselves. The consultant and material services avail- 
able from the Division of Library Extension should be available to 
supplement this service but not to take its place. 

School Libraries 

The most provocative activity in the development of the school 
library program was the pilot literature program for elementary 
teachers sponsored by the State Department of Education in Gar- 
rett County. Seventeen teachers, representing all six grades, com- 
pleted the course; several others, including two from the high 
school, audited it. 

The program was different from the usual course in children's 
literature. In reality, it was a self-selection reading program for 
teachers. Children's books and professional ones were available 
in the county library and in the various schools represented ; in addi- 
tion, the Division of Library Extension lent 334 books for the dura- 
tion of the program. Two hundred and fifty-eight different chil- 
dren's books were read 674 times, an average of 39.6 books per 
teacher. 

The teachers learned that literature for children has content and 
quality. They evaluated the books they read. They were shown 
how to use them with their pupils in their reading program and in 
all content areas. They reported that their pupils were becoming 
better readers and were enjoying reading more than ever. They 



82 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



thought it made the teaching of reading skills both easier and more 
meaningful. The county is continuing a similar program next 
year. 

There were two regional meetings for school librarians during 
the year. One was held in Baltimore for the high school librarians 
on the Western Shore. This was a day-and-a-half meeting with 116 
high school librarians, supervisors, and principals present. Mrs. 
Mary Peacock Douglas, school library supervisor, Raleigh, N. C., 
was the consultant. The other was a one-day meeting for all of 
the school librarians on the Eastern Shore. It was held in Easton 
and was attended by 58 librarians, teachers, principals, and super- 
visors. Mrs. Margaret Atwood, librarian of the Polytecnhnic 
High School, Baltimore City, and Miss Grace Jones, librarian of the 
Snow Hill High School, were the consultants. 

The Division of Library Extension again circulated to 20 coun- 
ties an exhibit of 550 selected new books for schools. According to 
reports received 2,400 teachers, 13,000 pupils, and 127 librarians 
examined the books. The exhibit, with its accompanying catalog, 
gives an opportunity for new books to be examined before they are 
selected for purchase. The exhibit stays in one county from one 
to four weeks and is used in whatever manner the supervisors feel 
is most effective. 

Frederick county appointed a supervisor of school library serv- 
ices, the first such position in the county. Miss Alice L. Robinson 
has been appointed to fill the position. Mr. Murray L. Andrews 
has been appointed as supervisor of school libraries in Montgomery 
County, filling the vacancy created when Miss Robinson moved to 
Frederick. 

An annual report is received from every high school library in 
the State. These reports show that 95,956 books were added 
during the year and that $267,626 or $2.00 per pupil was spent for 
library materials. The annual report of the supervisor of school 
libraries in Baltimore County shows an average circulation of 31.7 
books per pupil in 50 elementary schools. All but four of these 
schools have a full-time librarian and the four have a part-time one. 



Maryland State Department of Education 83 

division of vocational education 
Agriculture 

During the last four decades technical and scientific changes 
have caused most of the Maryland farming to change from a simple 
family enterprise to a complex business enterprise. This change 
has brought with it a series of problems directly affecting vocationa 
agriculture. Some of these changes are as follow: 

1. A decrease in the number of full-time farmers and an increase 
in part-time farmers 

2. A considerable increase in mechanization of farm production 

3. An increase in the number and importance of "jobs related to 
farming" 

4. A change in practices brought about by scientific research 

5. The present decrease in the average Maryland farmer's pur- 
chasing power 

Training present and prospective Maryland farmers for pro- 
ficiency in farming and in related occupations is still the primary 
aim of vocational agricultural instruction. ''Learning to Do, Doing 
to Learn, Earning to Live, Living to Serve" is not only the Future 
Farmers of America creed but likewise a guiding philosophy in the 
program of agriculture education. It is not enough for a student 
to learn facts from a book. He must develop skills and judgment 
which will enable him to perform farm operations and manage 
farm enterprises. 

Following are some significant facts about vocational agriculture 
as of the fiscal year 1956-57: 

1. Enrollment in courses has changed but little in the past 3 years 

2. Classroom and farm facilities continue to show marked improve- 
ment in the high schools of the State 

3. Future Farmers of American programs have improved, largely as 
a result of the State's 7 FFA regional programs of activities 

4. The University of Maryland summer school for vocational 
agriculture teachers has been changed to permit one course per 
week for each of four weeks. This change gives more flexibility 
in permitting teachers to take courses which will be most bene- 
ficial to them. 

5. Farm mechanics instruction has shown improvement due primarily 
to the improved facilities and recent teacher farm mechanics 
workshops. 

6. The pattern for course of study construction, developed at the 
Towson Workshop, is used in practically all departments. 

Distributive Education 

Distributive education is attempting to meet the needs brought 
about by the great changes taking place in selling, merchandising 
of foods and other products, as well as services. At no time since 



84 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



the turn of the century has there been a more dynamic change in 
the character of retail distribution than that which is in evidence 
today. Successful salesmen and successful retailers are among the 
highest wage-earning groups in the country. Distributive educa- 
tion courses in the high schools of the State are designed to provide 
training for workers engaged directly in merchandising activities, 
such as distributing to consumers, retailers, jobbers, wholesalers, 
farmers, and industry. 

Close working relations are maintained between the staff of 
the State Department of Education and local advisory committees, 
retail merchandising associations, associations of commerce, and 
other industrial and business organizations. Teacher-co-ordinators 
perform an outstanding service in developing educational relation- 
ships with these organizations and indirectly serve as an important 
public relations agent for the school's educational program and the 
acceptance of its graduates. 

All distributive education programs in the State are organized 
on a part-time, co-operative schedule. The students spend a half 
day in school and the other half day on the job. A total of 385 
students were enrolled in distributive education classes. These 
students worked a total of 189,037 hours with earnings totaling 
$174,976. The average income per pupil was $764 for the year. 
These students, besides earning this money under actual practical 
working conditions as employees, received sufficient high school 
credits to earn a high school diploma. 

Home Economics Education 

A two-week workshop in the newer methods of clothing con- 
struction was held during the summer. Teachers were selected by 
each county and city on the basis of their ability and interest in 
attending the workshop and in conducting teaching sessions through- 
out the year for other teachers in their school system. Nineteen 
counties and Baltimore City were represented at the workshop. In 
addition to the instruction in the newer methods, some sessions 
were devoted to d'^veloping ideas for the in-service program for 
which they would be responsible. 

The in-service program in the newer methods of clothing con- 
struction conducted by the teachers was carried out in a variety of 
ways. The type of program was based on several factors, such as 
teacher needs, location of schools, and time available for an in- 
service program. 

A two-day meeting was held for teacher educators, county and 
city supervisors, for the purpose of continuing work on plans and 
procedures for improving the teacher education program. From 
nine areas which had been previously designated as those which 
needed further study, the area selected to which intensive study 
would be made during the following year was "A Family Living 
Emphasis in the Home Economics Program." Supervisors and 



Maryland State Department of Education 



85 



teacher educators met in small committees and planned for addi- 
tional ways to carry out the procedures suggested. Representatives 
from the U. S. Office of Education served as consultants. 

In Allegany County three clothing clinics were offered to pro- 
vide more opportunities for adults. The program afforded women 
an opportunity to receive help with individual problems in clothing 
construction and alteration. Sessions were held in elementary 
schools for a period of six weeks to accommodate women who 
could not attend classes offered on a semester basis. 

The State President of Future Homemakers of America served 
as a vice-president for the national organization and the State 
Historian of New Homemakers of America served as a vice-president 
for that national organization. 

Trade and Industrial Education 

At the present time there is a crystallization of public opinion 
that the public schools are becoming a major agency in preparing 
young people for work. Each future citizen should be given every 
opportunity to develop his talent for producing, managing, provid- 
ing service, or otherwise contributing to the common economic wel- 
fare. The all-day trade and industrial education programs are 
offered in 32 schools in 9 counties and in Baltimore City. Approxi- 
mately 6,000 pupils were enrolled in 30 different trade courses. 

Through regular meetings with local directors, county super- 
visors, and high school principals, policies and practices were de- 
veloped to meet the changing conditions in industry. Particular 
attention is directed toward having the schools use wisely and well 
the resources of the community. In order to insure effective in- 
struction, courses of study are undergoing constant revision. Special 
committees of employers and advisory groups assit in the further 
development of these courses. There is a definite need for expansion 
of the program in the county schools and also a need for addi- 
tional offerings in established centers. 

Co-operative Part-time Classes 

A pupil enrolled in a co-operative part-time program divides 
his time between school and a part-time job for which he receives the 
prevailing wage, spending half of the day in school and the remaining 
time in employment. The in-school schedule includes a balanced 
combination of subjects required for graduation, as well as those 
directly related to the job in which he is employed. Performance 
and progress of the students on the job are supervised by the em- 
ployer in co-operation with the local school teacher-co-ordinator. 

Trade Extension and Apprenticeship (Evening Classes) 

The primary purpose in evening industrial classes is to give the 
person already employed an opportunity to acquire greater skill in 



86 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



or knowledge of the occupation in which he is engaged so that the 
work rhay be done more efficiently and the individual become better 
fitted for promotion. These workers must keep abreast of tech- 
nological changes in the industry. Courses are usually organized 
on a semester basis and consist of 24 sessions of two-hours each 
during each semester. 

Apprenticeship courses provide related technical information 
to apprentices on a two-night-a-week basis, three hours each ses- 
sion. Courses are designed to supplement skills and knowledge 
provided by the employer during the apprentice's on-the-job em- 
ploj'ment. Apprenticeship is usually for a period of four years. 
There were 6,979 students enrolled in the evening extension classes 
in this category of educational service. 



Veterans' Vocational Training 

This program of training has been a very active one during the 
past year. There are many veterans completing their training as 
additional veterans enter the program. The number of approved 
establishments (industrial plants and manufactiring centers) re- 
mains rather constant. There are approximately 400 active estab- 
lishments in the State at the present time and approximately 1,000 
veterans in training. Each week there are some completing the 
program and new ones enrolling. This program is organized and 
supervised directly by members of the vocational staff of this De- 
partment. 

The Veterans' Institutional On-Farm Training Program (agri- 
culture education) has decreased over the past year smce many 
veterans have concluded their training and are now actively engaged 
in farming. There are relatively few eligible veterans currently 
entering the program. 



Educational Services to Industry 

A member of the vocational staff in this Department works 
directly with industry in the organization of training programs 
which industry conducts within the plants. A training supervisor 
in each industry receives advice and counsel from the Department's 
representative in the techniques and good practices used in con- 
ducting such a training program for workers. This Department 
also assisted in planning for and training of instructors for the 
Baltimore City Department of Education building operations di- 
vision through a summer workshop for custodial engineers. 

A "Manpower Development" clinic was held in January. This 
clinic was sponsored jointly by the Maryland Society of Training 
Directors and the State Department of Education. Ninety rep- 
resentatives from industry and the field of vocational education 
attended. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



87 



In March a management conference, "Human Relations 
Seminar/' was conducted by the University of Maryland, with 
more than 200 conferees in attendance. 

Related instruction classes for apprentices were developed in 
Frederick, Maryland, for apprentices in Frederick and surrounding 
areas. The classes maintained perfect attendance, with 18 appren- 
tices from 8 Frederick firms. 

The State Department of Education was requested by Black 
and Decker Manufacturing Company to conduct the initial phase of a 
training program in *'Job Relations" for a group of engineers. 
Similar training programs will be conducted by the training de- 
partment within the company. 

A State-wide program is being developed to have service clubs 
and other local interested organizations sponsor ''apprentice rec- 
ognition days" as part of their activities. In Baltimore City a 
service club recognized a group of professional student nurses at a 
special luncheon given in their honor. Each girl was presented 
with a certificate in recognition of her services. The hospitals 
and their directors of nurse training were deeply appreciative of the 
attention paid to their profession. 

In this particular area of educational service, the primary 
function of this Department is to assist local firms which are not 
sufficiently large to have in-service training programs, develop a 
well-rounded training program for the employees, and train mem- 
bers of the firm's staff to conduct similar training programs with- 
in the industry. 



88 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

One of the most important advances in the field of vocational 
rehabilitation in recent years has been the development of research 
and demonstration projects by private and public agencies with the 
aid of federal grants made possible under P.L. 565. During the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1957, two such projects were completed 
in Maryland by the Goodwill Industries in Baltimore and Hagers- 
town. As a result of improved equipment and somewhat expanded 
program in these two facilities, vocational rehabilitation clients 
have greater opportunities for training and placement than they 
ever had before. 

Two other research projects got under way in the same period: 
one was initiated by the Phipps Psychiatric Clinic of The Johns 
Hopkins Hospital which has for its purpose the finding of more effec- 
tive ways of rehabilitating the mentally ill, and the other by the 
Baltimore Council of Social Agencies which plans a study of factors 
governing success or failure in the rehabilitation of handicapped 
persons. Each of these latter two studies will be in full operation 
during the coming year and should be completed in 1959. 

In an effort to give more intensive counseling service to junior 
and senior high school students who are physically handicapped, an- 
other worker was added to the rehabilitation staff in the Southern 
Maryland area. He maintains contact with counselors, pupil 
personnel workers and visiting teachers in Montgomery and Price 
George's counties, and makes plans for rehabilitation services in the 
case of each handicapped student when he graduates or withdraws 
and is ready for training or placement. It is the plan of the Di- 
vision to establish similar counseling service in all areas of the 
State; a worker has been engaged in this field in Baltimore City 
since 1935. 

An additional counselor was assigned to aid in the rehabilitation 
of blind persons living in certain counties during the fiscal year just 
ended. Previously, all service for blind persons outside the City of 
Baltimore had been rendered by local general counselors with the 
aid of the State office. This emphasis on work for the blind in rural 
areas should result in better service for this seriously handicapped 
group. 

A change in the Social Security Law which was enacted by the 
84th Congress requires all cases applying to the Bureau of Old Age 
and Survivors Insurance for disability determinations to be referred 
to the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation for possible rehabilita- 
tion service. The amended act also specifies that the Disability 
Determinations Unit of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation 
shall make disability determinations on all applicants over 50 years 
of age who are eligible for insurance benefits and for children who 
became disabled prior to age 18 and who, under certain conditions, 
are eligible for benefits, also. These changes in the Social Security 
program will increase materially the number of cases referred to 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



vocational rehabilitation from that source, and plans have been made 
to render adequate services to this additional group of persons. It 
is conceivable that in the not too distant future the greatest source 
of referrals to the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation will be the 
Bureau of Old Age and Survivors Insurance. 

During the year, an additional counselor was assigned for one 
day a month to the prosthetic appliance clinic at Kernan's Hospital, 
and a second counselor was assigned one day a week to the Heart 
Work Classification Unit at the University of Maryland Hospital. 
These two clinics have proved themselves of tremendous value to 
the State Vocational Rehabilitation program during the time that 
they have been in operation. 

Continued assistance was given to the Community Research 
Associates program in Washington County which is seeking to de- 
velop a plan of rehabilitation for disabled persons who are members 
of "multi-problem" families. This project will complete its work 
on December 31, 1957. The Vocational Rehabilitation service 
has co-operated with it from its inception two years ago by making 
available whatever time of a counselor was necessary. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1957, vocational re- 
habilitation services were rendered to 4,636 disabled persons. Of 
this number, 1,218 were rehabilitated; 598 were closed with service, 
and the remaining 2,820 were still receiving service at the close of 
the year. The total cost of Maryland's vocational rehabilitation 
program in 1957 was $094,399, of which $351,667 went for direct 
services to cases. 



90 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 1 — Actual Days Schools Were Open: Opening and Closing Dates: 
Maryland Public Schools : Year Ending June 30, 1957 





Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 


COLNTY 


Days 


Schools 


Schools 


County 


Days 


Schools 


Schools 




Schools 


September, 


June, 




Schools 


September, 


June, 




Were Open 


1956 


1957 




Were Open 


1956 


1957 


Allegany 


182 


6 


11 


Harford 


181 


10 


14 


Anne Arundel . 


180 


6 


14 


Howard 


181 


7 


14 


Baltimore City 


183 


5 


20 


Kent 


181 


6 


11 


Baltimore 


182 


6 


21 










Calvert 


180 


6 


14 


Montgomery . 


180 


4 


14 . 










Pr. George's. . 


181 


4 


14 


Caroli'^e 


181 


6 


11 


Queen Anne's. 


181 


6 


11 


Carroll 


182 


4 


14 


St. Mary's . . . 


180 


6 


14 


Cecil 


180 


6 


14 




182 


6 


7 - 


Charles 


180 


5 


13 








Dorchester. . . . 


180 


5 


12 


Talbot 


180 


5 


7 










Washington . . 


181 


10 


12 


Frederick 


182 


5 


14 


Wicomico .... 


181 


5 


7 


Garrett 


182 


4 


7 


Worcester. . . . 


183 


4 


10 



TABLE 2— Fall Enrollmeni, Teaching Staff, Number of Schools: Public and 
Nonpublic : State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1957 



Type of School 


Grand Total 


Elementary 


High 


ENROLLMENT 


Total 


617,092 
507,759 
109,333 


413,524 
321,438 
92,086 


203,568 
186,321 
17,247 


Public* 




TEACHING STAFF 


Total 


22,969 
19,165 
3,804 






Public* 


10,561 


8,604 











NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 





1 1,3 59 


1,164 


316 


Public* 


t960 


797 


232 


Nonpublic 


t399 


367 


84 



* Includes enrollment, teaching staff, and number of elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges 
t Excludes duplicates. 



Maryland State 



Department of Education 



91 



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98 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 10— Special Classes and Schools: Baltimore City: 
Semester Ending June 30, 1957 



Kind of Class or School 


Number of 


Net 


Average 


Per Cent of 




Classes 


Roll 


Net Roll 


Attendance 



PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED PUPILS 



Total and Average 


28 


393 


401 


90 


4 




3 


40 


42 


92 





Deaf 


4 


35 


36 


91 







4 


50 


50 


91 







9 


147 


153 


88 


5 




5 


68 


67 


88 


6 


Mixed* 


3 


53 


53 


91 






MENTALLY HANDICAPPED PUPILS 



Total and Average 


208 


4,472 


4,478 


79.0 


Opportunity 


122 


2,609 


2,530 


83.3 




3 


39 


39 


80,0 




83 


1,824 


1,909 


73.8 


SOCIALLY AND EMOTIONALLY HANDICAPPED PUPILS 


Total and Average 


10 


111 


103 


85.6 


Highwood School 


4 


56 


54 


84.2 




4 


43 


37 


72.6 


Child Study Center 


2 


12 


12 


100.0 




TRAINABLE 


PUPILS 






Schools No. 176, 302 


7 


66 


64 


84.5 



* Junior high classes consisting >f pupils with the following deficiencies: cardiac, 7; deaf, 4; cerebral 
palsy, 4; hearing conservation, 4; orthopedic, 31; sight conservation, 3. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



99 



TABLE 11— Number of Pupils*: Maryland Schools for Atypical Children 
and Institutions : Fall of 1956 



Name and Location 


Kinder- 
garten 


Number ( 

Ele- 
mentary 


DF Pupils 
High 


Special 


Total 
Number 
of 

Different 
Teachers 


Barrett School for Girls, Glen Burnie 




38 




6 


8 


Boys' Village of Marjdand, Inc., Cheltenham 




165 


17 


20 


10 


Child Study Center, Baltimore 

Children's Guild, Baltimore 








18 


4 


tio 








3 


Children's Rehabilitation Institute, Cockeys- 










ville 








55 


11 










18 


3 


Garden School, Baltimore 








4 


1 


Hillandale Nursery School, Silver Spring .... 








4 


1 


Houses of Good Shepherd (2), Baltimore. . . . 




26 


23 




11 


Linwood Children's Farm, Ellicott City 








13 


4 


Maryland School for Blind, Baltimore 


26 


84 


52 


6 


29 




til 


85 


46 


7 


25 


Maryland Training School for Boys, Loch 










Raven 




253 


93 




18 


Montrose School for Girls, Reisterstown .... 




15 


90 




10 


Rosewood State Training School, Owings 












Mills 


tioi 


121 




32 


15 




28 






2 


St. Francis' School of Special Education, 












Baltimore 








58 


9 


St. Vincent's Infant Home, Baltimore 


t33 








3 










6i 


9 


Searchlight Training Cer':ers (2), Baltimore. 








79 


7 










26 


4 



Note: These enrollment are also shown in TABLES IV and V. 
* Figures furnished by principE's of schools. 

t Includes following number in nursery school: Children's Guild, 10; Maryland School for Deaf, 3; 
Rosewood State Training School, 38; St. Vincent's Infant Home, 18. 



100 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 12— Total Resident Births in Maryland: 1947-1956 

Data from Division of Vital Records and Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



Total Resident Births in Maryland 



County 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


Total State 


56,827 


54,092 


54,048 


55,992 


61,081 


63,165 


64,523 


67,445 


69,205 


72,108 


Allegany 


2,554 


2,160 


2,009 


1,803 


1,824 


1,785 


1,729 


1,577 


1,586 


1,583 


Anne Arundel. . . 


2,474 


2,603 


2,655 


2,873 


2,969 


3,132 


3,444 


3,811 


3,840 


4,036 


Baltimore City. . 


23,992 


22,083 


21,496 


21,382 


22,630 


22,775 


22,748 


23,523 


23,291 


23,782 


Baltimore 


6,867 


6,375 


6,379 


6,661 


7,489 


7,937 


8,547 


9,0.57 


9,699 


10,701 


Calvert 


361 


395 


366 


400 


405 


427 


432 


431 


471 


413 


Caroline 


405 


420 


373 


417 


396 


432 


431 


405 


423 


460 


Carroll 


978 


887 


849 


771 


818 


1,019 


888 


921 


984 


995 


Cecil 


788 


790 


763 


756 


801 


901 


958 


1,054 


1.163 


1,261 


Charles 


686 


723 


723 


746 


782 


684 


825 


877 


937 


891 


Dorchester 


613 


574 


555 


559 


630 


585 


597 


632 


588 


616 


Frederick 


1,478 


1,339 


1,377 


1,342 


1,464 


1,438 


1,430 


1,519 


1,533 


1,597 


Garrett 


568 


551 


541 


530 


508 


497 


467 


448 


448 


470 


Harford 


1,385 


1,353 


1,379 


1,419 


1,645 


1,789 


1,724 


1,855 


1,982 


1,917 




565 


546 


542 


569 


597 


581 


615 


660 


698 


708 


Kent 


327 


293 


299 


313 


285 


318 


317 


354 


387 


320 


Montgomery . . . 


3,411 


3,600 


4,000 


4,740 


5,478 


6,113 


6,275 


6,708 


7,053 


7,394 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's. . . 


3,996 


4,243 


4,563 


5,508 


7,020 


7,250 


7,566 


7,687 


8,072 


8,997 


289 


313 


326 


311 


298 


334 


279 


335 


386 


357 


St. Mary's 


736 


781 


824 


883 


916 


881 


1,029 


1,116 


1,085 


1,046 




484 


432 


417 


436 


432 


446 


427 


477 


429 


433 


Talbot 


425 


415 


418 


427 


435 


458 


451 


431 


499 


470 


Washington .... 


1,989 


1,791 


1,760 


1,697 


1,714 


1,794 


1,771 


1,869 


1,967 


1,929 




875 


892 


866 


894 


980 


1,002 


1,019 


1,061 


1.094 


1,144 


Worcester 


581 


533 


568 


555 


565 


587 


554 


637 


590 


588 



Maryland State Department of Education 



101 



TABLE 13— White Resident Births in Maryland : 1947-1956 

Data from Division of Vital Records and Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



White Resident Births in Maryland 



County 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


Total State 


46,324 


42,651 


42,178 


43,599 


47,992 


50,146 


50,918 


53,204 


54,548 


56,382 


Allegany 


2,524 


2,126 


1,976 


1,769 


1,792 


1,758 


1.691 


1,540 


1,553 


1,554 


Anne Arundel . . . 


1,943 


2,020 


2,034 


2,196 


2,322 


2,467 


2,734 


3,033 


3,137 


3,324 


Baltimore City . . 


17,799 


15,414 


14,507 


14,168 


14,938 


14,989 


14.628 


14,949 


14,366 


14,032 


Baltimore 


6,328 


5,737 


5,766 


6,036 


6,932 


7,382 


7,999 


8,560 


9,209 


10,203 


Calvert 


156 


179 


168 


148 


160 


186 


196 


169 


190 


175 


Caroline 


310 


323 


276 


319 


300 


325 


313 


301 


311 


352 


Carroll 


930 


840 


805 


725 


778 


922 


840 


881 


912 


942 


Cecil 


735 


717 


707 


695 


737 


834 


883 


979 


1,067 


1,173 


Charles 


394 


405 


390 


407 


397 


387 


457 


476 


527 


494 


Dorchester 


412 


368 


324 


317 


350 


342 


324 


370 


337 


327 


Frederick 


1,338 


1,196 


1,233 


1,189 


1,304 


1,306 


1,282 


1,369 


1,388 


1,431 


Garrett 


565 


550 


541 


529 


507 


497 


466 


448 


448 


470 


Harford 


1,244 


1,186 


1,202 


1,241 


1,426 


1,557 


1,493 


1,625 


1,763 


1,695 


Howard 


477 


426 


443 


463 


480 


480 


499 


561 


582 


589 


Kent 


240 


216 


211 


231 


204 


224 


209 


258 


257 


215 


Montgomery . . . 


3,114 


3,289 


3,664 


4,402 


5,122 


5,794 


5,899 


6,343 


6,720 


7,010 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


3,448 


3,605 


3,918 


4,775 


6,157 


6,430 


6,705 


6,782 


7,108 


7,880 


208 


213 


211 


200 


197 


231 


190 


226 


254 


226 


St. Mary's 


5^,7 


564 


615 


659 


690 


675 


812 


877 


831 


798 


Somerset 


297 


256 


217 


240 


226 


243 


223 


264 


225 


219 


Talbot 


296 


271 


282 


290 


281 


293 


301 


270 


337 


301 


Washington .... 


1,950 


1,761 


1,726 


1,647 


1,684 


1,769 


1,731 


1,825 


1,925 


1,882 


Wicomico 


684 


6*?3 


633 


628 


686 


733 


735 


736 


771 


774 


Worcester 


375 


326 


329 


325 


322 


322 


308 


362 


330 


316 



102 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 14— Colored Resident Births in Maryland : 1947-1956 

Data from Division of Vital Records and Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



County 



Colored Resident Births in Maryland 





1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


Total State 


10,503 


11,441 


11,870 


12,393 


13,089 


13,019 


13,605 


14,241 


14,657 


15,726 


Allegany 


30 


34 


33 


34 


32 


27 


38 


37 


33 


29 


Anne Arundel . . . 


531 


583 


621 


677 


647 


665 


710 


778 


703 


712 


Baltimore City. . 


6,193 


6,669 


6,989 


7,214 


7,692 


7,786 


8,120 


8,574 


8,925 


9,750 




539 


638 


613 


625 


557 


555 


548 


497 


490 


498 


Calvert 


205 


216 


198 


252 


245 


241 


236 


262 


281 


238 




95 


97 


97 


98 


96 


107 


118 


104 


112 


108 


Carroll 


48 


47 


44 


46 


40 


97 


48 


40 


72 


53 


Cecil 


53 


73 


56 


61 


64 


67 


75 


75 


96 


88 


Charles 


292 


318 


333 


339 


385 


297 


368 


401 


410 


397 




201 


206 


231 


242 


280 


243 


273 


262 


251 


289 


Frederick 


140 


143 


144 


153 


160 


132 


148 


150 


145 


166 


Garrett 


3 


1 




1 


1 




1 








Harford 


141 


167 


177 


178 


219 


232 


231 


230 


2i9 


222 


Howard 


88 


120 


99 


106 


117 


101 


116 


99 


116 


119 


Kent 


87 


77 


88 


82 


81 


94 


108 


96 


130 


105 


Montgomery . . . 


297 


311 


336 


338 


356 


319 


376 


365 


333 


384 


Prince George's . 


548 


638 


645 


733 


863 


820 


861 


905 


964 


1,117 


Queen Anne's. . . 


81 


100 


115 


111 


101 


103 


89 


109 


132 


131 


St. Mary's 


179 


217 


209 


224 


226 


206 


217 


239 


254 


248 


Somerset 


187 


176 


200 


196 


206 


203 


204 


213 


204 


214 


Talbot 


129 


144 


136 


137 


154 


165 


150 


161 


162 


169 


Washington .... 


39 


30 


34 


50 


30 


25 


40 


44 


42 


47 




191 


229 


233 


266 


294 


269 


284 


325 


323 


370 


Worcester 


206 


207 


239 


230 


243 


265 


246 


275 


260 


272 



Maryland State Department of Education 103 
TABLE 15 

Withdrawals* from Public Schools: Counties of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1957 



County 



Total 



Withdrawals by CoDEf 



Transferred to 
Other Schools 



Wl I W2 |W3&4 W7 



W13 



W5 



W6 



W8 



W9 



WIO 



Wll W12 



W14 



ELEMENTARY 



II 



Total Counties 


20,480 


7,486 


361 


12,064 


49 


40 


128 




14 


35 


299 


3 


1 




A llptrnn V 


595 


294 


19 


257 


1 


5 


7 








12 




1 






2 201 


649 


37 


1 464 


11 


1 


12 






2 


24 










3|477 


1,133 


55 


2*174 


1 


« 


39 






7 


53 








Calvert 


195 


57 




128 






2 








6 








Caroline 


163 

1 


41 




112 




3 






1 




6 








Carroll 


364 


143 


2 


205 


1 


2 


3 








8 










8371 


277 


14 


535 




2 


2 




i 




6 








Charles 


392 


81 


7 


290 


1 




3 




2 


1 


7 










173 


63 


1 


98 




'2 


1 






2 


5 


1 








586 


305 


7 


251 




1 


2 






1 


18 


1 








154 


63 




85 




1 






1 


1 


3 








Harford 


1,365' 


549 


2 


786 


3 


1 


"i 








23 










390 


79 


9 


288 


2 




3 






i 


8 








Kent 


128 


19 


1 


108 






















Montgomery 


3,168, 


1,410 


110 


1,585 


3 


3 


12 




i 


15 


28 


1 






Prince George's . . . 


3,518 


1,201 


39 


2,183 




5 


22 




2 


4 


53 








Queen Anne's 


165 


38 


3 


122 




1 










1 








St. Marv's 


732; 


225 


29 


472 




1 


'2 




1 




2 










■ 157 


31 


2 


120 










1 




3 








Talbot 


180 


37 


3 


120 


3 


'2 


6 




1 




8 








Washington 


785 


491 


15 


257 


1 


2 


6 






1 


12 








Wicomico 


4911 


234 


6 


232 


3 




5 




'3 




8 










264 

1 


66 




192 


1 












5 









HIGH 



Total Counties 


12,006 


1,368 


1 


4,414 


306 


41 


210 


224 


4,182 


42 


526 


80 


509 


32 


Allegany 


5071 


47 




137 


16 


3 


7 


22 


213 




23 




34 




Anne Arundel 


1,240 


111 


11 


469 


46 


2 


25 


26 


427 


3 


61 


6 


50 


3 


Baltimore 


2,421 


203 


16 


849 


66 


9 


83 


45 


952 


3 


79 


20 


95 


1 


Calvert 


119 


2 


2 


38 


3 




4 




61 




8 


1 








142 


9 




59 


1 






3 


59 




3 




'7 




Carroll 


306 


5: 


1 


91 


3 




9 


4 


126 




10 


1 


8 


2 


Cecil 


434 


45 


1 


180 


10 




7 


4 


152 


1 


10 


3 


17 


4 


Charles 


240 


23 




72 


5 


1 




9 


95 


1 


27 




7 




Dorchester 


111 


9 




35 


1 


1 


3 


1 


41 


1 


11 


'3 


5 






393 


46 




102 


13 


1 


3 


3 


174 


7 


14 


9 


18 


3 


Garrett 


I29I 


5 




36 


6 


1 






65 




5 


1 


5 


5 


Harford 


604 


80 




296 


13 


2 


'5 


'4 


142 


i 


29 


11 


20 


1 


Howard 


262 


8 




109 


9 


2 


3 




100 




11 


5 


14 


1 


Kent 


88 


9 




33 






1 




28 




11 


1 


5 




Montgomery 


1,446 


291 


13 


634 


29 


3 


32 


23 


278 


22 


49 


6 


57 


9 


Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's 


1,945 


249 


16 


768 


49 


3 


8 


58 


632 




61 


4 


97 




156 


6 




53 




3 




3 


68 




13 




9 


i 


St. Mary's 


238 


10 


'4 


122 


'4 


1 


"1 


4 


84 




4 




4 




Somerset 


124 


8 




39 


4 


2 


4 




54 




7 




6 




Talbot 


126 


4 




38 


5 




6 




57 




12 




4 






548 


136 


3 


90 


15 


3 


6 


5 


244 


2 


19 


3 


22 






247' 


8 




85 


5 


1 


2 


7 


82 




47 




8 


'2 




180 


8 




79 


3 


2 


1 


3 


48 


1 


12 


6 


17 





* Withdrawals who did not re-enter during 1956-57 the school from which they withdrew, 
t Codes: Wl — Transferred — Public school in county; W6 — Armed services; 

W2 — Transferred — Nonpublic school in county; W8 — Age 16 or over; 

W3&4 — Transferred — Outside county; W9 — Mental; 

W7 — Committed to institution; WIO — Physical; 

W13— Death; Wll— Economic; 

W5 — Special case; W12 — Marriage; 

W14 — Suspended. 



104 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 16 — Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal: 
State of Maryland : 1923-1957 



Year Ending June 30 


Average Number Belonging pe 
AND Principal 


R Teacher 


Total 


Elementary* 


High 


1923 


31.8 


33.4 


22.0 


1928 


30.6 


32.4 


21.9 


1933 


32.9 


34.8 


25.6 


1938 


31.5 


33.4 


25.2 


1943 


31.5 


36.3 


23.3 


1948 


28.8 


34.1 


21.8 


1949 


28.0 


32.8 


21.6 


1950 


28.3 


33.3 


21.8 


1951 


28.1 


33.0 


21.9 


1952 


27.6 


32.2 


21.7 


1953 


27.5 


31.9 


21.8 


1954 


27.4 


31.5 


22.0 


1955 


26.8 


30.4 


22.0 


1956 


26.8 


30.4 


22.0 


1957 


26.3 


30.0 


21.7 



* Excludes elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



105 



TABLE 17 — Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal: State of 
Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1957 



Average Number Belonging per Teacher 
AND Principal 



County 


Total 


Elementary* 


High 


Total State 


26 


3 


30 





21.7 




24 


7 


27 


4 


22.1 




27 





27 


8 


23.4 


Baltimore City 


27 


7 


32 


1 


22.2 


Baltimore 


25 


9 


27 


9 


23.3 


Calvert 


24 


9 


28 


9 


19.9 


Caroline 


23 


5 


29 


1 


18.4 


Carroll 


24 


5 


29 


9 


19.7 


Cecil 


25 





29 


7 


19.7 


Charles 


24 


7 


29 


3 


19.9 




25 


6 


29 


9 


21.2 




27 





32 


7 


21.7 


Garrett 


25 





26 


7 


23.1 




26 


2 


31 


5 


20.7 


Howard 


23 


6 


27 


8 


19.3 


Kent 


23 




28 


2 


18.2 




25 


9 


30 


4 


19.7 




26 


8 


29 


7 


23.0 




22 


8 


28 


1 


17.8 


St. Mary's ' 


27 


8 


31 


4 


22.8 


Somerset 


23 


1 


27 


2 


18.8 


Talbot 


23 


6 


27 





19.9 


Washington 


25 





28 


5 


21.3 




25 


8 


29 





21.9 




24 





27 


9 


19.5 



• Excludes elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



106 



Ninety-First Annual Report 









is S 








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tH 








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S 3 



Maryland State Department of Education 



107 



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Ninety-First Annual Report 




Maryland State Department of Education 



113 



TABLE 25 — Number and Per Cent Nonpromotions : Maryland County High School 
Pupils : Year Ending June 30, 1957 



r^OTTMTV 
\^\J U IN 1 I 


June Net Roll 


Per Cent 

Not 
Promoted 


Total 


Promoted 


Not Promoted 


Total Counties 


209,683 


200,938 


8,745 


4 


2 


Allegany 


8,408 


8,182 


226 


2 


7 


Anne Arundel 


19,596 


18,662 


934 


4 


8 




41,555 


39,959 


1,596 


3 


8 


Calvert 


2,254 


1,942 


312 


13 


8 




2,354 


2,229 


125 


5 


3 


Carroll 


5,494 


5,309 


185 


3 


4 


Cecil 


5,313 


5,005 


308 


5 


8 


Charles 


3,869 


3,520 


349 


9 







3,235 


3,147 


88 


2 


7 




7,426 


7,357 


69 





9 


Garrett 


2,642 


2,496 


146 


5 


5 


Harford 


8,438 


8,241 


197 


2 


3 


Howard 


3,405 


3,194 


211 


6 


2 


Kent 


1,778 


1,658 


120 


6 


7 


Montgomery 


32,609 


31,463 


1,146 


3 


5 


Prince George's 


33,184 


31,986 


1,198 


3 


6 


Queen Anne's 


1,943 


1,866 


77 


4 







3,334 


3,118 


216 


6 


5 




2,410 


2,146 


264 


10 


9 


Talbot 


2,251 


2,001 


250 


11 


1 


Washington 


9,866 


9,777 


89 





9 


Wicomico 


5,305 


4,833 


472 


8 


9 




3,014 


2,847 


167 


5 


.5 



Note: Policy of promotion and nonpromotion varies in the different counties. 



114 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 28 — Causes of Nonpromotion : Maryland County Elementary Pupils*: 

Year Ending June 30, 1957 









Number Not Promoted by 


Cause 






Per 










County 


Total 


Cent 












Not 


Not 


Personal 


Irregular 


Imma- 


All Other 








Illness 


Attend- 


turity t 












ance! 






Total Counties 


8,745 


4.2 


214 


488 


7,593 


450 


Allegany 


226 


2.7 


5 


13 


204 


4 


Anne Arundel 


984 


4.8 


26 


84 


763 


61 




1,596 


3.8 


26 


45 


1,236 


289 


Calvert 


312 


13.8 


3 


28 


276 


5 


Caroline 


125 


5.3 




4 


120 


1 




185 


3.4 


1 


25 


159 






308 


5.8 


10 


23 


273 


' '2 


Charles 


349 


9.0 


14 


41 


283 


11 


Dorchester 


88 


2.7 


2 




86 






69 


0.9 


4 


ii 


52 


' '2 


Garrett 


146 


5.5 


8 


5 


130 


3 


Harford 


197 


2.3 


2 


12 


i8r 


1 


Howard 


211 


6.2 


7 


6 


195 


3 




120 


6.7 


5 


11 


104 






1,146 


3.5 


40 


46 


1,017 


"43 


Prince George's 


1,198 


3.6 


28 


48 


1,118 


4 




77 


4.0 




3 


70 


4 




216 


6.5 


■9 


20 


184 


3 




264 


10.9 


6 


16 


235 


7 


Talbot 


250 


11.1 


2 


17 


227 


4 


Washington 


89 


0.9 


2 


3 


81 


3 




472 


8.9 


11 


9 


452 






167 


5.5 


3 


18 


146 





* Excludes pupils attending elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
t Irregular attendance due to unfortunate home conditions. 
X Immaturity — social, intellectual, emotional. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



115 



TABLE 27 — Number and Per Cent of Nonpromotions in First Grade* : 
Counties of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1957 



County 


FiR3T Grade Enrollment 


Number and Per Cent 


Not Promoted 




Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties 


37,145 


19,397 


17,748 


2,889 


1,871 


1,018 


7 


8 


9 


6 


5 


7 




1,324 


693 


631 


92 


56 


36 


6 


9 


8 


1 


5 


7 


Anne Arundel .... 


3,558 


1,842 


1,716 


351 


222 


129 


9 


9 


12 


1 


7 


5 


Baltimore 


7,314 


3,798 


3,516 


511 


353 


158 


7 





9 


3 


4 


5 


Calvert 


408 


217 


191 


56 


36 


20 


13 


7 


16 


6 


10 


5 


Caroline 


415 


205 


210 


38 


25 


13 


9 


1 


12 


2 


6 


2 


Carroll 


887 


473 


414 


57 


38 


19 


6 


4 


8 





4 


6 


Cecil 


987 


495 


492 


122 


73 


49 


12 


4 


14 


7 


9 


9 


Charles 


694 


382 


312 


91 


65 


26 


13 


1 


17 





8 


3 


Dorchester 


563 


304 


259 


42 


24 


18 


7 


5 


7 


9 


6 


9 


Frederick 


1,228 


633 


595 


26 


17 


9 


2 


1 


2 


7 


1 


5 


Garrett 


432 


229 


203 


41 


23 


18 


9 


5 


10 





8 


9 


Harford 


1,502 


763 


739 


59 


27 


32 


3 


9 


3 


5 


4 


3 


Howard 


606 


318 


288 


54 


32 


22 


10 


7 


10 


1 


7 


6 


Kent 


340 


183 


157 


38 


23 


15 


11 


2 


12 


6 


9 


5 


Montgomery 


6,004 


3,148 


2,856 


441 


291 


150 


7 


3 


9 


2 


5 


3 


Prince George's . . . 
Queen Anne's .... 


5,979 


3,103 


2,876 


419 


273 


146 


7 





8 


8 


5 


1 


355 


198 


157 


10 


9 


1 


2 


8 


4 


5 





6 


St. Mary's 


626 


340 


286 


72 


48 


24 


11 


5 


14 


1 


8 


4 


Somerset 


429 


226 


203 


76 


45 


31 


17 


7 


19 


9 


15 


3 


Talbot 


412 


217 


195 


79 


45 


34 


19 


2 


20 


1 


17 


4 


Washington 


1,606 


842 


764 


25 


17 


8 


1 


5 


2 










Wicomico 


923 


496 


427 


128 


84 


44 


13 


9 


16 


9 


10 


3 


Worcester 


553 


292 


261 


61 


45 


16 


11 





15 


4 


6 


1 



* Excludes pupils in first grade of elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



116 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 28— High School Graduates: State of Maryland— 1948-57 : 
by County— Year Ending June 30, 1957 



Year and County 


High School Graduates 










Total 


Boys 


Girls 



BY YEAR, 1948-57 



1947-48 


11,920 


5,390 


6,530 


1948-49 


10,519 


4,849 


5,670 


1949-50 


8,372 


4,084 


4,288 


1950-51 


12,101 


5,637 


6,464 


1951-52 


12,352 


5,741 


6,611 


1952-53 


13,356 


6,256 


7,100 


1953-54 


14,070 


6,670 


7,400 


1954-55 


15,161 


7,313 


7,848 


1955-56 


16,767 


8,019 


8,748 


1956-57 


17,122 


8,368 


8,754 



BY COUNTY, 1956-57 



Total State 


17,122 


8,368 


8,754 




907 


480 


427 




1,050 


457 


593 


Baltimore City 


4,418 


2,277 


2,141 




2,130 


1,000 


1,130 


Calvert 


112 


52 


60 




184 


93 


91 


Carroll 


414 


193 


221 


Cecil 


254 


116 


138 




212 


93 


119 


Dorchester 


249 


126 


123 




544 


264 


280 




232 


108 


124 




487 


238 


249 




220 


106 


114 


Kent 


111 


62 


49 




1,802 


875 


927 


Queen Anne's 


1,911 


911 


1,000 


140 


70 


70 




161 


69 


92 




152 


65 


87 


Talbot 


127 


55 


72 




764 


380 


384 




345 


178 


167 




196 


100 


96 



* Includes the following number of 1957 summer school graduates: Anne Arundel, 6 boys — 2 girls; 
Montgomery, 12 boys— 18 girls; Prince George's, 25 boys— 6 girls; St. Mary's, 1 boy— 1 girl; total, 44 
boys — 27 girls. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



117 



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Ninety-First Annual Report 



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1,208 
1,605 


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Caroli-.. 

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Charles 


Frederick 

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Harford 

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Montgomery . . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . . 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 


Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



122 



Ninety-First Annual Report 





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State 


Total 

Alabama 


California . . 

Colorado 


Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 


Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Massachusetts 


Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina 

Ohio 


UKianoma 

Pennsylvania 


Khode island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 


Texas ; 

Utah 

Vermont 


. 

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Maryland State Department of Education 



123 



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Science 


O 


45,245 
67.4 

2,713 
4,067 
11,161 
561 
668 

1,714 
1,411 
1,114 
928 
1,503 

451 
1,135 
1,021 

538 
4,690 

4,149 
554 
724 
698 
713 

2,824 
1,379 
529 


PQ 


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05 00-^CM ^r-^■^ ^ ^ lO TJ( CO ^ 


Social 
Studies 


O 


OO CM "0 d O 00 CD 05 CO 00 O CO — r-n CM CO CO 
C3 • CD 00 00 »0 00 ^ IC "0 O CD CM O 00 CO CD .—i CO i CO CO 
lO CD 02 CO 0> CM CO 00 00 0> .— i 00 CD CD CM lO Tfi »/5 ^ »0 «0 
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29,247 
43.0 

443 
3,306 
8,731 

141 
62 

843 
275 
473 
213 
1,604 

839 
1,799 
516 

267 

6,748 
149 
152 
452 
264 

1,353 

617 


Total 
Enrollment* 


o 


67,137 

3,476 
6,021 
13,188 
657 
800 

2,026 
1,671 
1,297 
1,148 
2,673 

980 
2,667 
1,197 

620 
9,185 

10,111 
691 
896 
813 
820 

3,555 
1,693 
952 


m 


68,024 

3,766 
5,966 
13,493 
640 
852 

2,083 
1 ,.522 
1,262 
1.097 
2,673 

1,013 
2,747 
1,200 
628 
9,550 

10,004 
687 
876 
824 
771 

3,682 
1,711 

977 



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1 

124 Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 35— Number of Different Individuals Teaching and Number of Public High School 
Offering Each Subject : Counties of Maryland : Fall of 1956 



County 


Core 


Arts and 
Crafts 


English 


Mathe- 
matics 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Businef 
Educat 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Numb( 
of 


S 




2 

<o 
jC 


CO 


S 
Ji 


"o 


J 




2 
a> 
j= 


1 




JO 

"o 


m 




2 


CO 


m 


■§ 


2 


- 




i 


§ 

M 


es 


1 




J3 




§ 


es 






J3 




§ 


<A 




J3 


J3 













m 




CO 




u 





CQ 




a: 


H 




CO 







<o 



CC 


1 






c 


Total Counties 


943 


135 


90 


67 


920 


162 


1,159 


199 


871 


162 


884 


196 


81 


77 


117 


106 


43 


36 


37C 


1 
1 




23 


11 






75 


11 


51 


12 


55 


11 


37 


12 


7 


6 


4 


4 


2 


2 


17 




Anne Arundel 


122 


7 


4 


3 


59 


6 


116 


10 


55 


6 


71 


9 


4 


4 


8 


7 


3 


3 


24 




Baltimore 


245 


17 


22 


14 


81 


12 


210 


20 


73 


12 


202 


20 


9 


8 


11 


10 


6 


5 


51 
g 




Calvert 


8 


3 


4 


3 


14 


3 


18 


3 


16 


3 


14 


3 


1 


1 


2 


2 










2 


2 






22 


6 


22 


6 


28 


6 


25 


6 


4 


4 


1 


1 






g 




Carroll 


32 


13 


18 


11 


33 


10 


51 


14 


34 


10 


43 


14 


2 


2 


6 


6 






2Q 




Cecil 


7 


4 


5 


6 


32 


9 


35 


9 


26 


9 


28 


9 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


3 


14 






18 


5 


7 


6 


26 


7 


30 


8 


25 


7 


26 


8 


1 


1 


4 


4 






9 




Dorch sstcr 


8 


2 






20 


5 


17 


5 


20 


5 


17 


5 


2 


2 


3 


3 






9 




Frederick 


63 


9 


'4 


'4 


27 


7 


57 


9 


22 


7 


34 


9 


6 


5 


5 


5 


1 


1 


23 




Garrett 


30 


3 


3 


2 


9 


1 


16 


3 


2 


1 


6 


2 






2 


2 






6 




Harford 


78 


7 


9 


7 


32 


7 


57 


7 


22 


7 


23 


7 


5 


5 


7 


6 






17 
8 






16 


5 






18 


6 


19 


6 


22 


6 


21 


6 


1 


1 


3 


3 








Kent 










22 


4 


18 


4 


23 


4 


17 


4 


2 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 


6 




Montgomery 


9 


1 


1 


1 


228 


21 


153 


21 


231 


21 


97 


21 


17 


15 


22 


17 


10 


7 


42 




Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


184 


19 


6 


3 


68 


10 


106 


21 


51 


10 


60 


20 


3 


3 


7 


8 


11 


9 


43 




4 


2 






13 


4 


13 


4 


14 


4 


10 


4 






7 


4 


1 


1 


6 




St. Mary's 


4 


2 


'2 


1 


20 


5 


21 


5 


21 


5 


19 


5 


'2 


'2 


2 


2 






7 






17 


7 


1 


2 


12 


7 


23 


7 


18 


7 


22 


7 


1 


1 


3 


3 






8 




Talbot 


10 


2 


1 


1 


12 


3 


17 


3 


17 


3 


13 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 






9 






43 


10 


3 


3 


48 


8 


53 


12 


42 


8 


47 


12 


5 


5 


7 


7 


3 


2 


16 




Wicomico 










38 


6 


40 


6 


44 


6 


37 


6 


3 


3 


4 


4 






11 




Worcester 


20 


4 






11 


4 


16 


4 


10 


4 


15 


4 


1 


1 


3 


3 


'2 


'2 


9 





County 



Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

C'harles 

Dorchester . . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Agri- 
Culture 



Number 
of 



Industrial 
Work 



Number 
of 



Home 
Eco- 
nomics 



Number 
of 



75 



397 



171 



Physical 
Education 



Number 
of 



Art 



Music 



Driver 
Educat'n 



Number Number 
of of 



620 

29 
39 
96 



Number 
of 



85 93 218 



Library 



Guidance 



Number Number 
of of 



Admi 
tratio 
Super 



Numl 
of 



246 177 430 



Maryland State Department of Education 



125 





Other* 


l,39i 






■ t> ■cg-'j' 

■ fC rHiH 


CO X • • X 
eg t> • • Tj< 


eg ... . 

05 • • • ■ 
. . . . 


insoeo 

r-(t>«0 




Reading 
7-8 


2,472 




00 • • 
ic ■ • 00 ■ 
U5 • ■ 


• ^ -05 • 

•CO • o ■ 

■ eg 1 ■ 


• 05 • • 

. .Tf . . 

• • eg ■ • 




eg • • 




Special 


eg 

00 i-H 

cg«o 




•OOOi • • 

■ m ■ • 


in . • • 
... 


: : : :^ 


«D ■ • 
.-H . .(N • 


C- ■ X 
t> ■ CO 




Speech 
Including 

Public 
Speaking 


1,586 
1,421 




in eg o • 
T}<^T}<eg • 

i-H CO 


coco • ■ ■ 
(C* ■ ■ ■ 


05 05 in ■ t> 
iHcgcg -x 

■CO 


05 ■ • ■ • 

;o ■ ■ • ■ 
eg ... . 


in • • 
;o • • 




Journalism 


1,936 
1,846 




eg o 00 eg • 
X ooeo • 
i-ieg->t 


«c o ■ t> eo 
t>-^ .com 


oiego --H 

«5XC0 -Tj" 


05 • ■ • • 
05 • ■ • • 
eg ... . 


05 T)< 

eo«oeg 




1 

Dramatics 


946 
1,148 




• eo « o • 
■ 05 eg eg ■ 
eo 


00 • <<»< • X 
t> V) • 05 


■ -eg • m 


05 • • • • 
X • • • • 


■ 05 eg 

•X— 1 


Englis 1 


(N 


13,192 
13,440 


(O 

m 

Oi 


ic i-H 05 eg 05 
o> '^.eg__»-i —1 
i-Hcg" 


05 O -^Tj< o 

egt-eo«it- 
•"J* eg eg eg m 


246 
502 
231 
115 
1,846 


t>T)<Tf t-X 

-^f X in eo 

0_rH i-H ,-( — 1 

eg* 


rH05 05 

^ in o 
xeocg 






15,528 
16,873 


FALL OF 


lo 05 eg eo t> 
■"ir 05 lo o 
eo^.-H eg 
^'^"eo* 


— ico^x «o 
■<r xeoo-t 
in CO coco t> 


in <x> o «D 
T)< ;o CO lo ;o 
eg 50 eo »-i eo__ 
eg* 


«o in 05 eg t- 
;o o i-H 05 eg 
co_^<-H eg i-H eg 
eg* 


ego5t- 
05Tj<eg 




O 


19,626 
21,510 


COUNTY, 


O CO 05 05 1-^ 
X O to 05 X 

eg^^x^cg^^i-i eg 


c^^in^Tf 
oj t> X in CO 

?0 CO CO 05 


«i 05 eo eg o 
o5 X ^ eo 
CO t> eo eg x__ 
eg* 


3,198 
210 
261 

257 
281 


1,254 
528 
281 




05 


<c o 

— OJ 

eg eg 


BY 


t> in ■>!j" eg 

t-C0t~-<;OO5 

co__co__eo__eg eg 
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Ti<coo5 eg-* 
X <-i X t> eg 

t> ;D Tf o 


eg in «D «o ^ 
X in X e^ o 
eo o_Tj< eg in 

.-H* CO* 


ino5xcgcg 
^ «o m 05 eg 
x_eg eo eg eo 
eo* 


O CO « 

in «oeo 




00 


26,509 
28,955 ' 




eg in CO •<a' o 
;oego5 05 in 
co_^c-__ t>-__cg eo 
i-T cg'in 


in t~t- eg eg 
O T)< ;o 05 
05 1> in Tj< i-H 


;o o o in «o 
r-( eg to o 
■«*< eg_^-<j< eg o 


X <£> «c in eo 
eo t> t> X eg 
CO oj CO eo CO 
t* 


»-i o eg 
t> eo o 
eo^t> T}< 






28,988 
28,484 




!0 eg in— 
o eg in X in 
eg__«o_«D eg so 
i-Tcg'in 


X in Tt X «o 

t-'J'OtOX 

t> t> in CO 05 


eo eg X X eo 

t> 05 O X o 

eo i-j^in eg eg 


eo CO ^ CO CO 

Tf* 


X 

o CO CO 


Total 
Excluding 
Duplicates 


126,537 
135,647 




7,601 
12,172 
26,582 
1,297 
1,652 


05 eo ^ «o 

005«Ot}<t)< 

^_^>-H_in eg^co^ 
CO* eg* N* in 


Tf 05 X eo 
x—iosTtos 
o^TT co__cg^;a 
eg*in*cg*'-H*x* 


o t> —1 m T-i 
o t- 1> eo 05 

rHCO__t> «D_in 
0*^*r^'rH*i-r 

eg 


7,229 
3,404 
1,933 


Total 
Including 
Duplicates 


131,711 
144,362 




9,352 i 
12,537 i 
28,193 

1,533 

1,680 


;o t> ^ CO t> 

Tj<— ITJ"— (CO 

eo__«>^«D_Tj«_in 
Ti<'oo''cg"cg'"in 


Oieoxegx 
i-icgeo«ox 
.-Hys^t-^^eg,^'*^^ 
eg*in*eg*^*or 


X eo t> X in 

O 05 ^ o 

■«t_co_x__ 
eg 


7,712 
3,661 
2,039 


Year and 
County 


1956-57 




Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 


Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 


Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 


Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



126 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



Other 


oc t- 


Consumer 
Problems 

and 
Economics 


ot- 
00 CO 
com 


Economics 

and 
Sociology 


1,127 
895 


Psychology 


2,326 
2,369 


Geography 


2,908 
2,929 


Problems 
of 

Democracy 


9,634 
10,385 


United 
States 
History 


15,907 
17,209 


World 
History 


16,573 
17,406 


Civics and 
Social 
Studies 


22,781 
25,465 


Studies 


Eighth 
Grade 


26,516 
28,887 


Social J 


Seventh i 
Grade 


29,038 
28,480 


Total 
Excluding 
Duplicates 


121,857 
129,902 


Total 
Including 
Duplicates 


127,279 
135,034 



D 

Z >- 

« D 

< O 



i-H (N • • 1-H lO CO «0 lO 00 
oc I> • ■ (M (M t~ iM 05 



CO U5 lH w 



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«0 -l-lTjfUl (M 



O (M CO 05 00 

«D eg O rH 05 
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inioooeo-^ 
lo t> >o 00 

T-TrHeo" 



O500(MCOtJ< lOOOeOrH (NC<1050tH (MOO-* 

ix> o CO cooscotho CO uo ic oa toij^o 

•«t eg i-H i-H IC eg (M i-H OrHrHrHrH IC 00 IM 



iHrfCOCDO 
U5 00 CO O «D 
CO CO CO t- 



lo o X CO t- •^insooic 
Tfc-cginco o>05(Mt>cg 
(MCDcoi-icc ■^'HcgrHcg 



tH oc l> 05 00 



05 ?D i-H eg CO 

t> «D O OS 
lO CO 1-1 lO 



«5icmeoi> oouoeooorH 

Tl<-<t05i-<0 OO-^LOOOO 

eoT}<.-icgoo -"S* 1-1 eg eg eg 



CO CD 
CO CO t> lO CD 

eg__co_^oo_cg eg 
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05 CO O 

o o 00 CO eg 

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eg uo CO lo eg ioiot)<cdoo 
xioocegco --ico»oooo 
eoo-^eg-^ ooegcorHcg 



lo eg 05 
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O-l m CO o 

CD eg 05 lo lo 
co__t>-^t-__eg CO 



uo t- c- eg 

0-^CD05'* 
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oocDCDioeo 
i-icgt>cDO> coi>t>occg 
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1-1 o eg 

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00 eg ici-i CO 
eg eg lo 00 in 
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00 lO 00 CD 
t> CD X 

t> t> in CO 05 



coegxxx 050505T)<ri< 

COOiOXX t- rH iH Tj< rH 

corHincgrH cocoTt<eooo 



cgegcocDO 
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cDcgino5 05 -^^t^^cco 
eg 05 o o eo i>05tj<-^05 
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rf CO CO Tt< o eg eg 

x__co_i> cD__in t>'-^^05. 

oTi-H i-Ti-Ti-H co^co'i-T 



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t>"i-ri>-"'TH%-r 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



127 



Consumer 
Science 


1,744 
1,860 


Senior 
Science 


1,958 
2,619 


Physics 


2,941 
2,895 


Chemistry 


5,499 
6,280 


OGY 




(M CO 


Biol 




18,081 
20,090 




Ninth 
Grade 


20,534 
23,718 


Science 


Eighth 1 
Grade 


oc m 
aToo" 




Seventh 
Grade 


00 00 
oec 


Total 
Excluding 
Duplicates 


86,634 
110,558 


Total 
Including 
Duplicates 


87,389 
110,736 



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128 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



c 
=> 
o 

B 

.2 



Business 
Arithmetic 

.J 


6,461 
6,743 


Mathe- 


matics 
Review 


2,363 
2,199 


Trigo- 
nometry 


1,629 
1,720 


letry 


Solid 


1,172 
1,415 


Geoir 


Plane 


5,447 
6.412 


ebra 




5,304 
6,083 


< 




10,794 
13,073 


s 

03 

s 

0) 

X 


II 

Grades 
(10, 11, 12) 


550 
2,184 


General Mi 


I 

(Grade 9) 


14,689 
16,175 


S 

08 

B 


SO 


26,398 
28,808 


<v 
IS 


Seventh 
Grade 


28,384 
28,494 


Total 


be u 


102,489 
110,951 


Total 


Including 
Duplicates 


103,191 
113,306 


Year and 
County 


1955- 56 

1956- 57 



•»1< Ifl X 50 <-l 
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130 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



NOMICS 


Vocational 


2,951 ! 
3,382 1 




35,002 
37,367 


o 
o 


Genei 








Ho 


"a 


t-'o" 




Tot 




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3,249 
3,220 


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38,441 
40,469 


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INDUS! 


Totals 
Excluding 
Duplicates 


39,543 
41,877 




Totals 
Including 
Duplicates 


41,411 
42,679 



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132 Ninety-First Annual Report 



S 



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OS 



Salesman- 
ship* 


m 1-1 


Business 
Law 


1,176 
1,266 


Business 
Economics 


;d 00 


Book- 
keeping 


5,729 
5,692 


Steno- 
graphy 


5,289 
5,418 


Personal 

and 
Academic 
Typing 


3,764 
4,036 


Advanced 
TyF)ing and 
Office 
Practice 


4,280 
4,689 


Typing 


8,461 
7,995 


General 
Business 


7,599 
7,803 


Total 
Excluding 
Duplicates 


23,257 
24,344 


Total 
Including 
Duplicates 


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Maryland State Department of Education 



133 



TABLE 44 — Pupils Enrolled in Driver Education and Training: Maryland 
County High Schools : Fall of 1956 



Year and 
County 


Driver Education 


Driver Training 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


1955-56 


414 


180 


234 


5,174 


2,308 


2,866 


1956-57 


1,311 


619 


692 


5,719 


2,611 


3,108 


BY COUNTY, FALL OF 1956 




23 


8 


15 


433 


228 


205 


Anne Arundel 


56 


27 


29 


221 


82 


139 


Baltimore 


135 


58 


77 


1,172 


548 


624 


Calvert 














Caroline 


24 


li 


13 


104 


49 


55 


Carroll 


23 


8 


15 


136 


41 


95 


Cecil 


20 


1 


19 


102 


34 


68 


Charles 














Dorchester 


43 


19 


24 


175 


89 


86 


Frederick 


506 


229 


277 








Garrett 








64 


21 


43 


Harford 


204 


109 


95 


378 


185 


193 


Howard 


61 


35 


26 


125 


52 


73 


Kent 








155 


81 


74 


Montgomery 








480 


162 


318 


Prince George's .... 


32 


20 


12 


921 


462 


459 


Queen Anne's 














St. Mary's 








75 


40 


35 


Somerset 














Talbot 








76 


37 


39 










321 


127 


194 


Wicomico 


i84 


94 


90 


525 


253 


272 










256 


120 


136 



134 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 45 — Pupils Reported as Members of Glee or Choral Clubs, Orchestras, 
or Bands : Maryland County High Schools : Fall of 1956 



Year and 
County 


Glee or Choral 


Clubs 


Orchestras, Bands 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


1955-56 


12,181 


3,744 


8,437 


10,152 


6,795 


3,357 


1956-57 


12,983 


4,386 


8,597 


11,121 


7,262 


3,859 




BY 


COUNTY, 


FALL OF 1956 






Allegany 


932 


340 


592 


768 


445 


323 




2,393 


966 


1,427 


668 


494 


174 




2,456 


936 


1,520 


1,643 


1,049 


594 


Calvert 


107 


22 


85 


121 


90 


31 




235 


65 


170 


164 


102 


62 




500 


239 


261 


422 


245 


177 


Cecil 


516 


112 


404 


283 


144 


139 


Charles 


264 


73^ 


191 


370 


250 


120 


Dorchester 


117 




117 


189 


103 


86 




823 


245 


578 


579 


389 


190 


Garrett 


1 297 


76 


221 


464 


200 


264 


Harford . 


363 


136 


227 


358 


210 


148 










105 


83 


22 


Kent 


3i5 


94 


221 


131 


70 


61 


Montgomery 


1,243 


347 


896 


1,666 


1,202 


464 


Prince George's 


948 


280 


668 


1,620 


1,112 


508 


Queen Anne's 


295 


77 


218 


119 


69 


50 


St. Mary's 


80 


31 


49 


43 


23 


20 




25 


11 


14 


92 


42 


50 


Talbot 


132 


37 


95 


102 


85 


17 


Washington 


577 


186 


391 


629 


442 


187 


Wicomico 


44 


15 


29 


371 


268 


103 




321 


98 


223 


214 


145 


69 



Maryland State Department of Education 



135 



TABLE 46— Number and Per Cent of Men Teachers: 
Public Schools of Maryland: 1923-1957 



Number and Per Cent Men Teachers 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Total 




Elementary 




High 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1923 


1,048 


14 


2 


591 


9 


3 


457 


43.3 


1928 


1,136 


13 


8 


574 


8 


4 


562 


39.6 


1933 


1,347 


16 


1 


617 


9 


4 


730 


41.4 


1938 


1,613 


18 


6 


766 


11 


5 


847 


41.8 


1943 


1,464 


16 


6 


561 


8 


8 


903 


36.8 


1948 


2,018 


19 


9 


392 


8 


8 


1,626 


36.7 


1949 


2,173 


19 


9 


422 


6 


7 


1,751 


37.7 


1950 


2,498 


21 


7 


515 


7 


9 


1,983 


39.8 


1951 


2,965 


23 


9 


604 


8 


8 


2,361 


42.7 


1952 


3,263 


24 


5 


709 


9 


5 


2,554 


43.3 


1953 


3,628 


25 


3 


822 


10 


2 


2,806 


44.9 


1954 


3,885 


25 


1 


866 


9 


8 


3,019 


45.4 


1355 


4,406 


26 


2 


1,019 


10 


6 


3,387 


46.7 


1956 


4,818 


27 





1,098 


11 





3,720 


47.3 


1957 


5,114 


26 


7 


1,074 


10 


2 


4,040 


46.9 



136 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 47 — Decrease in Teachers in One-Teacher Elementary Schools*: 
Counties of Maryland : 1923-1957 



County Elementary School Teachers 



Year Ending 




In One-Teacher Schools 


June 30 


Total 










Number 


Per Cent 


1923 


3,775 


1,496 


39.6 


1928 


3,805 


1,206 


31.7 


1933 


3,666 


740 


20.2 


1938 


3,628 


558 


15.4 


1943 


3,270 


275 


8.4 


1948 


3,591 


161 


4.5 


1949 


3,817 


155 


4.1 


1950 


4,087 


127 


3.1 


1951 


4,359 


103 


2.4 


1952 


4,860 


75 


1.5 


1953 


5,401 


59 


1.1 


1954 


5,984 


50 


0.8 


1955 


6,661 


30 


0.5 


1956 


7,075 


24 


0.3 


1957 


7,455 


23 


0.3 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization of grades one to five or more. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



137 



TABLE 48— Number and Per Cent of Schools, Teachers, Pupils: One-Teacher* 
Elementary Schools : Counties of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1957 



V_/U U IN 1 I 


One-Teacher Elementary Schools* 


Number of One- 
Teacher Schools 


Teachers in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Pupils in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Number 


Per Centt 


Nvunber 


Per Centt 


Number 


Per Centt 


Total Counties 


23 


3.9 


23 


0.3 


584 


0.3 






























Baltimore 


' 1 


1.4 


' 1 


o'.i 


'27 


"i 


Calvert 


1 


7.7 


1 


1.3 


20 


X 


Caroline 














Carroll 














Cecil 




























Dorchester 


10 


38.5 


io 


9.3 


235 


7.3 


Frederick 


2 


5.7 


2 


0.9 


84 


1.1 


Garrett 


2 


11.1 


2 


2.0 


59 


2.2 


Harford 




























Kent 


' 2 


14.3 


' 2 


3.1 


51 


2.9 


Montgomery 














Prince George's 




























St. Mary's 
















' 2 


10.5 


' 2 


2.2 


■53 


2'.2 


Talbot 


3 


17.6 


3 


3.6 


55 


2.4 


Washington 














Wicomico 














Worcester 















* Schools having a one-teacher organization of grades one to five or more, 
t Based on total elementary schools in each county. 
t Less than 0.1 per cent. 



138 Ninety-First Annual Report 



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140 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 51 — Number of Certificates Issued to Maryland Teachers, Principals, 
Administrative and Supervisory Personnel in the County Schools by the 
Maryland State Department of Education: 1954-55, 1955-56, 1956-57 



Grade of Certificate 



Number of Certificates Issued 



1954-55 



1955-56 



Total Number of Certificates Issued 

Administration and Supervision 

Administration and Supervision 

High School Supervision 

Elementary Supervision 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Supervisor of Special Subjects 

Supervisor or Director in Special Areas 

Visiting Teacher 

County Librarian 

High School 

Principal 

Academic 

Special , . 

Vocational 

Junior High School 

Nonpublic 

Elementary 

Principal 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education . 

Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 

Bachelor of Science for Kindergarten Teaching 

Advanced First Grade 

Nonpublic Bachelor of Science 

Emergency Certificates 
Degree 

Administration and Supervision 

High School 

Elementary School 

Nondegree 

Administration and Supervision 

High School 

Elementary School 

Provisional Certificates 

Substitute Teachers' Certificates 

Degree 

Nondegree 



3,679 



11 



16 

452 
333 
40 
90 
51 



48 
648 
52 
58 
5 
28 



479 
740 



23 
460 



44 



3,654 
4 



13 
440 

325 
37 
99 
58 



45 
678 
53 
62 
4 
21 



523 
628 



42 
434 



62 



Maryland State Department of Education 



141 



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5^ 



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O o o ®" o o o ^ o o o o o 



O CD O O CO CO ■ 

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■ — ■ • oo 



2-3 Years 
College 


Per 

Cent 


O ^ "S* CD CD CO OO M CD (M <X 05 O CO 00 C<I >rt 0> CD O 
CO lO " CO CO CO CO iC (M O CO M C<1 CO CO CO (M CO 


Num- 
ber 


ITS CO r-- cr. — f ^ CO CO <M <M t ^ co -r -r co co (M co co 

00^^(M CO — > 


Bachelor's 
Degree 


Per 
Cent 


66.6 

54.4 
65.5 
67.8 
71.0 
72.7 

78.8 
70.9 
73.0 
76.4 
67.1 

66.3 
76.8 
58.5 
67,2 
57.1 

70.2 
75.7 
71.4 
84.7 
61.5 

61.8 
71.9 
67.0 


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142 



Ninety-First Annual Refort 



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144 



Ninety-First Annual Report 





SENCE 




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JO JBUOISIAOJJ JOJ 








Year 



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liiiii 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



145 



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^^^^ 



146 Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 57 

Number and Per Cent of New Teachers: Maryland Public Schools: 1951-57 







New to Counties 


Increase 


Number New to County Who Were 










In 
Number 






Experienced 










of 












Year 


Total 
Teachers 


Number 


Per Cent 


Teaching 
Positions 
October 

to 
October 


Inex- 
perienced 


Sub- 
stitutes 

and 
Unknown 


But New 
to 
State 


In Coun- 
ties But 

Not 
Teaching 
Preced- 
ing Year 


From 
Another 
County 



GRAND TOTAL 



1950-51 


12,226 


2,411 


19 


7 


870 


1,379 


3V 


659 


33G 


184 


1951-52 


13.153 


2,648 


20 


1 


953 


1,353 


81 


843 


371 


264 


1952-53 


14,235 


2,744 


19 


3 


890 


1,430 


6 


940 


368 


252 


1953-54 


15,274 


3,264 


21 


4 


1.039 


1,579 


44 


1,068 


573 


248 


1954-55 


16,401 


3,586 


21 


9 


1,1J54 


1,709 


40 


1,336 


501 


314 


1955-56 


17,461 


3,531 


20 


2 


1,081 


1.716 


* 


1,360 


455 


299 


1956-57 


18,914 


3,925 


20 


7 


1,205 


2,033 




1,381 


511 


347 



TOTAL ELEMENTARY 



1950-5] 


6,670 


1,215 


18 


2 


329 


599 


20 


370 


226 


88 


1951-52 


7,214 


1,448 


20 


i 


558 


669 


46 


465 


268 


131 


1952-53 


7,992 


1,566 


19 


6 


586 


762 


2 


567 


235 


124 


1953-54 


8.630 


1,961 


22 


7 


638 


908 


32 


652 


369 


123 


1954-55 


9,181 


2,037 


22 


2 


782 


950 


24 


785 


278 


139 


1955-56 


9 668 


1,919 


19 


8 


498 


889 


* 


747 


283 


131 


1956-57 


10,372 


2,152 


20 


7 


636 


1,089 




774 


289 


146 



TOTAL HIGH 



1950-51 


5,556 


1.196 


21 


5 


541 


780 


17 


289 


110 


76 


1951-52 


5,939 


1,200 


20 


2 


395 


684 


35 


378 


103 


133 




6,243 


1,178 


18 


9 


304 


668 


4 


373 


133 


128 


1953-54 


6,644 


1,303 


19 


6 


401 


671 


12 


416 


204 


125 


1954-55 


7,220 


1,549 


21 


5 


572 


759 


16 


551 


223 


175 


1955-56 


7,793 


1,612 


20 


7 


583 


827 


* 


613 


172 


168 


1956-57 


8,542 


1,773 


20 


7 


579 


944 




611 


218 


201 



* Teachers who?e statu? could not be determined are prorated according to those teachers about whom such in- 
formation was available. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



147 



tcio 

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2 o ?r' 

ox is 



148 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



c 

O 

13 



CQ 



® 1 



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oc 



Who Last Taught 
Previous to 1955-56 


u 

•£ 

C « 


OS 

eg 


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In 

Maryland 


OS 

oc 

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t> in oc 

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coco 


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Who taught 


In 

Maryland 


O 

eg 


;d CO o eg 
»-(egio 


eoujcocgeo 


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Total 


1,209 


!£> X Tj< 00 
i-H O «0 OS 


00 <X> i-H OS r-l 
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Tj< Tj< rH rH 


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1 m eg ur eo co 
iCDo oeoocos 



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3 (L 0) 

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1- I- o 



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c 

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Maryland State Department of Education 



149 



o « 



ii-HC-cgoo t^ioecOTif -"itt-iceo 



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o 

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.= 6 bc M ^ I. 

o £ S u a- 

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15a 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 61 

Certificate Status of Elementary Teachers* New to Maryland County Public 

Schools : 1956-57 



County 


Total 


Regulab 


Emergency 


Substitute 


No 
Certi- 
ficate! 


B.S. 


Jr. 
H.S. 


H.S. 


A 1st. 


Degree 


Non- 
degree 


Degree 


XT 

Non- 
degree 


Total Counties. . . 


1,784 


a662 


7 


15 


1 


b624 


411 


2 


25 


37 


Per Cent 


100.0 


37.1 


0.4 


0.8 


0.1 


35.0 


23.0 


0.1 


1.4 


2.1 


Allegany 


27 


20 








5 


2 








Anne Arundel. . 


201 


64 




i 




61 


64 




9 


'2 


Baltimore 


384 


142 




1 




106 


129 




3 


1 


Calvert 


16 


10 




1 




3 


2 








Caroline 


9 


3 








2 


4 








Carroll 


27 


10 




5 




8 


4 








Cecil 


48 


16 




1 




9 


16 




2 


'4 


Charles 


14 


6 








6 


2 








Dorchester .... 


15 


6 








3 


6 










73 


14 


1 


1 




27 


25 




1 


4 


Garrett 


10 


4 




1 




1 


4 








Harford 


87 


38 




1 




17 


26 






5 


Howard 


26 


7 


1 






11 


6 




i 




Kent 


15 


6 




1 




6 


2 








Montgomery . . 


372 


124 


1 


1 




210 


25 




2 


9 


Prince George's 


275 


98 


1 






113 


52 




2 


8 


Queen Anne's. . 


6 


5 










1 








St. Mary's 


37 


7 








8 


14 




4 


'4 


Somerset 


16 


9 








4 


3 








Talbot 


14 


8 








2 


3 




1 




Washington . . . 


46 


25 


2 


i 




5 


13 








Wicomico 


47 


25 


1 






14 


7 








Worcester 


19 


15 








3 


1 









* All figures exclude transfers between and within counties, but includes transfers from Baltimore City, 
t "No certificate" includes teachers who stayed in service a short time, making certification impractical. 
a Includes one with elementary principal's certificate; two with clinical psychologist certificates; thirteen 

with speech therapist certificates. 
b Includes two with elementary principal's certificates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



151 



TABLE 62 



Certificate Status of High School Teachers* New to County Public Schools : 1956-57 



County 




Regular 


Elementary 


Emergency 


Substitute 




Total 


















No 






HA. 


Jr. H.S. 


Degree 


Non- 


Degree 


Non- 


Degree 


Non- 


Certi- 






CIO. V OC. 






degree 




degree 




degree 


ficatef 


Total Counties. . 


1,513 


688 


121 


37 




479 


65 


42 


41 


40 


Per Cent 


100.0 


45.5 


8.0 


2.4 


0.0 


31.7 


4.3 


2.8 


2.7 


2.6 


Allegany 


28 


6 


14 






6 




1 


1 




Anne Arundel. . 


154 


70 


8 


5 




49 


8 


8 


5 


i 


Baltimore 


296 


130 


39 


7 




91 


15 


4 


9 


1 


Calvert 


19 


5 


3 


1 




7 


3 








Caroline 


23 


14 


1 






7 


1 








Carroll 


63 


23 








25 


2 


3 


2 


"7 


Cecil 


47 


13 


1 


i 




24 


2 


2 


3 


1 


Charles 


29 


lo 


1 


2 




7 






3 




Dorchester .... 


11 


4 




1 




2 


2 




1 


"i 




54 


16 


3 






20 


6 


2 


4 


3 


Garrett 


15 


5 


2 


3 




5 










Harford 


90 


52 


7 


2 




19 


2 




i 


6 


Howard 


27 


18 








6 


2 




1 




Kent 


11 


4 








5 








'2 


Montgomery . . 


2.^3 


121 


6 


5 




81 


3 


6 


5 


6 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 


1^6 


102 


13 


2 




60 


7 


5 


3 


4 


20 


12 


3 






4 


1 








St. Mary's 


26 


7 








10 


5 


2 




"2 


Somerset 


20 


7 




3 




5 




4 




1 


Talbot 


17 


8 


1 






7 


1 








Washington . . . 


61 


30 


7 


2 




18 


1 


2 


i 






47 


16 


8 


1 




15 


1 


2 


2 


"2 


Worcester 


26 


10 


3 


2 




6 


2 






3 



* All figures exclude transfers between and within counties, but include transfers from Baltimore City, 
t "No certificate" includes teachers who stayed in service a short time, making certification impractical. 



152 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 63 — Number of Public Schools: Number of Teachers and Principals: State o 
Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1957 



Number of 
Teachers 

AND 

Principals 



elementary schools 



All Schools 


793 


30 


57 


139 


69 


13 


12 


18 


2, 


14 


26 


35 


18 


18 


13 


14 


78 


84 


10 


16 


19 


17 


39 


18 


1.0— 1.9 


34 


1 


1 

3 


1 

3 


1 


10 


2 


3 


1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


7 




2.0— 2.9 


67 




4 


3 


i 


5 




3 


8 


6 


1 


2 


4 




3 


1 


4 


6 




6 


I 


3.0—3.9 


39 


3 


4 


1 


1 


1 


2 




1 


2 


4 


2 




1 




2 


'2 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


4 


2 


4.0— 4 9. 


45 


1 
1 


4 


3 


1 


1 


2 


1 




2 


4 


'4 






1 


2 




2 


2 


6 


4 


5.0— 5.9 


37 


5 


2 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 





1 


4 






1 


1 


1 


6 


i 


I 




2 


2 




6.0— 6.9 


35 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


2 


1 
1 




i 




1 


2 


4 


1 


'3 


1 


4 


"i 


7.0— 7.9 


28 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


2 


1 


3 


1 




1 


1 


i 




4 


2 


1 


3 








8.0— 8.9 


28 


2 


4 


2 


2 






2 


1 




3 




1 


i 


2 


3 


1 


1 








1 


9.0— 9.9 


33 


7 


3 


1 




1 








3 


1 


1 




1 


2 


5 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


10.0—10.9 


44 


1 


1 


6 


4 




4 




3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


'3 


6 


8 




1 
1 


2 


11.0—11.9 


25 


2 


2 


6 


1 




1 


1 






1 


1 




2 


3 


1 






1 


1 


12.0—12.9 


36 






14 


2 


1 


1 








1 




2 




4 


7 


1 




1 


1 


1 


13.0—13.9 


28 


1 


4 


4 




1 




2 








"2 






7 


3 


1 


1 


1 


14.0—14.9 


32 


2 


3 


3 


3 




1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 






2 


5 


1 


1 


'2 


1 


15.0—15.9 


24 




I 


3 


3 




1 


1 




2 


1 






5 


4 








2 


1 


16.0—16.9 


31 


4 


5 


1 




2 






1 






1 


8 


3 










3 


17.0—17.9 


20 




2 


6 


3 






1 






2 


1 






1 






3 










1 




18.0—18.9 


20 




3 


6 


2 






1 








1 






'3 


1 




1 






1 




19 0—19.9 


12 




2 


2 


















i 




4 


3 














20.0—20.9 


13 




1 


3 


1 
1 






















4 


3 
1 










1 




21.0—21.9 


11 




2 


4 
























2 










1 




22.0—22.9 


13 




1 
1 


4 


2 








1 
















2 


3 














18 




4 


3 
















1 






4 


4 










1 




24.0—24.9 


12 
9 




1 


6 


















1 


1 






1 












'2 


25.0—25.9 




1 


2 


3 






















1 


1 














26.0—26.9 


12 
9 




1 


5 


1 


















1 






2 


1 












1 


27.0—27.9 




5 


1 






















2 


1 














28.0—28.9 


6 






2 


1 


















1 






1 


1 














29.0—29.9 


12 




1 


5 


4 










1 












1 














30.O-30.9 


14 




5 


7 






















2 














31.0—31.9 

32.0—32.9 


12 
8 






6 
2 


5 
5 
























1 
1 


















4 






2 


























1 














34.0—34.9 


5 






3 


2 






































35.0 and over 


17 




1 


11 


3 






1 












1 































































JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



yi Schools 

1.0- 2.9 


232 

2 
4 

10 
6 
10 
12 
4 
8 
12 
10 
11 
10 
20 
17 
14 
13 
12 
11 
5 
3 
11 
2 
4 
4 
4 
5 
2 
6 


10 


.9 


39 


20 


3 


6 


11 


9 


8 


5 


9 


3 


7 


6 


4 


21 


21 


4 


5 


7 
1 


3 


12 

i 
1 




3.0— 4.9 
















1 
1 

2 
1 


1 

2 
1 






1 
















5.0—6.9 


1 
1 
1 
1 








1 


1 
1 


2 

1 

2 
















1 
1 




7.0— 8.9 




1 


1 


1 


1 
1 






1 


1 
1 




1 




1 
1 


9.0—10.9 








11.0—12.9 




2 
1 
1 
1 






1 








13.0—14.9 


1 










1 








1 


15.0—16.9 




1 
2 
1 


1 






1 


1 
1 
1 












2 


1 


1 






17.0—18.9 




1 


2 
1 


1 


1 

'2 
1 

3 
4 
4 
3 




1 
1 


19.0—20.9 


2 
1 
1 


1 

i 
1 
1 


1 

'2 
1 






2 
1 
1 

3 

1 




21.0—22.9 


1 
1 
1 

1 

i 
i 


1 

'2 
1 

'2 
2 

i 


2 

• 2 
3 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 


1 






2 


i 
1 


23.0—24.9 


1 
2 








1 
3 
5 

3 


1 


1 


25.0—29.9 


1 
1 
2 
2 
2 


1 
1 




1 
1 








1 


30.0—34.9 

35.0-39.9 


i 


2 


1 


40.0—44.9 














1 












45.0-49.9 














1 
1 


1 


2 
1 
1 
1 
3 










50.0—54.9 






1 








1 


















55.0—59.9 
















2 


60.0—64.9 


"2 

'3 
2 
2 
3 
2 
5 


2 
1 


































65.0—69.9 


















1 






1 














70.0—74.9 




























75.0—79.9 
























1 














80.0-84.9 


1 
1 
2 




































85.0—89.9 
























1 
















90.0—94.9 






































95.0—99.9 








































100.0 an,] over 


1 






















































■■| 























Maryland State Department of Education 



153 



ABLE 64 — Number of Public Schools : Average Number Belonging : State of Maryland : 

Year Ending June 30, 1957 



Average 
Number 
Belonging 







>> 












































■o 
































n 








a 




egany 


ne Arun 


Itimore < 


Itimore 


Ivert 


roline 


rroll 




arles 


rchester 


!derick 


rrett 


rford 


ward 


a 


mtgomei 


nee Geo 


een Ann 


Mary's 


nerset 


o 


ishingtoi 


comico 




a 
< 


a 

m 




6 


CS 

a 


6 


6 


-a 

O 


o 
Q 




O 


CS 

W 


o 

K 


M 






3 




eg 









ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 





*793 


30 


57 


139 


69 


Ic 


12 


18 


21 


14 


26 


35 


18 


18 


13 


14 


78 


84 


10 


16 


19 


17 


39 


18 


15 




28 


1 


3 


1 


1 




1 


7 


2 


] 


3 


] 




^ 


t 




51 


'4 


2 


1 




1 




2 








7 


1 




1 


3 


] 


3 


4 


2 


4 


1 


2 


61— 90 


58 


2 


3 


2 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


1 


4 


6 




2 


4 


2 


2 


2 


3 


4 


] 


t 


2 


1 


91— 120 


27 


2 


3 


1 


1 


1 


2 




1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 














1 

2 


] 


3 


2 


3 


121— 150 


43 


1 


5 


1 


1 


1 


• • 


• • 


1 


2 


3 


3 


2 


1 


1 




5 


1 


1 


3 


5 


2 


2 


151— 180 


36 


1 


3 


1 






3 


2 


2 


2 




5 






1 


4 


4 


1 


1 
• • 


1 


1 


3 


1 




181— 210 


27 


2 


2 


2 


1 


4 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




3 


2 


■ • 


1 


1 






29 


2 


2 


2 


2 






2 


3 


1 


1 


1 




5 


4 


2 


1 








1 




41 


6 


5 


1 


3 










1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


5 


6 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 




1 


>71— 300 


38 


3 




5 


3 


1 




3 


1 




1 


3 


1 


2 


3 


5 




1 




2 


'3 


1 


iOl- 330 


24 


1 


'2 


2 


3 






3 




i 




2 


i 


1 


'1 


3 


3 














1 


i31— 360 


28 


1 


4 




i 


i 


1 










2 


5 


5 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


!61— 390 


36 




3 


8 




1 


1 




2 




2 




1 






8 


3 


1 


1 


1 


2 




2 




!91— 420 


40 


'2 


2 


7 


'4 


i 




1 


'2 


2 


'i 


1 


i 


3 






5 


7 








1 




i21— 450 


24 


2 


1 


6 


2 


1 












3 


4 




1 






3 


i 
1 


151— 480 


27 


1 


4 


4 


3 






1 






1 




1 






3 


4 








4 




;81— 510 


20 


2 


2 


4 










2 




i 


1 




1 


i 


i 


2 


3 














.11— 540 


21 




3 


5 


2 






1 


1 




1 




4 


2 










2 






41— 570 


13 




1 


3 


2 










1 






1 




4 


1 














71— 600 


16 




2 


4 


1 

3 
















"1 






1 


6 










1 






01- 660 


25 


i 


6 


5 








1 




1 










5 


2 










1 






61— 720 


26 




7 


5 












1 








5 


5 




1 






1 


i 




21— 780 


21 




i 


7 


3 
















2 






4 


2 












2 




81— 840 


19 






7 


6 


















2 






2 


2 
















41— 900 


21 


i 


'i 


00c 


7 










1 
















1 
















01— 960 


16 


























1 


















61—1020 


10 






7 


i 

3 
























2 
















21—1080 


10 






5 






1 












1 
























81—1140 


5 






5 










































41—1200 


1 






1 














































12 




'i 


10 


1 































































































JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



i Schools 


*232 


10 


9 


39 


20 


3 


6 


11 


9 


8 


5 


9 


3 


7 


6 


4 


21 


21 


4 


5 


7 


3 


12 


6 


4 




3 


1 






























1 




1 




f50— 100 


11 

6 




1 




1 


1 




2 


3 






1 


















'2 




Dl— 150 






1 








'2 


















1 






2 










51— 200 


16 






1 


2 




1 


2 


3 


1 




1 








2 






'i 


1 






1 




31— 250 


10 


'2 




1 






1 






i 


1 




1 


1 








1 








1 




51— 300 


4 


1 






1 














1 




1 










31— 350 


13 






"2 




2 


1 








1 




1 


1 




1 




'i 




1 






2 


51— 400 


11 












2 


1 






1 




2 


"i 






1 


'2 


i 










)1— 450 


17 
6 






3 








2 


i 


'i 


2 






1 


'2 






2 




3 






51— 500 


i 












1 


i 














1 


1 






i 








)1— 600 


15 
19 


1 


2 




1 








"2 


1 










1 




3 


"i 




3 






)1— 700 


i 


3 




1 






2 


1 


1 


2 




2 


1 




'2 










1 






)1— 800 


9 


1 




2 


i 


















1 


4 














)1— 900 


14 






1 


1 








1 








1 








3 


4 








1 




2 




)1— 1000 


15 


i 


i 


2 


2 














1 






7 










'i 






11—1100 


4 


1 


1 


2 






































11—1200 


4 




1 


1 


















1 










1 
















11—1300 


9 








2 






1 








1 




1 






1 


2 










1 






a— 1400 


7 




1 




1 












1 










1 


1 










1 


i 




11—1500 


2 




1 




1 


































1—1600 


2 


1 






























1 
















1—1700 


9 




1 


3 


1 


















1 






1 


2 
















1—1800 


3 




1 




1 






















1 
















1—1900 


1 




i 








































1—2000 


5 


i 




2 


1 
























1 


















: 1—2100 


3 


'i 


2 








































: 1—2200 


5 






5 












































: 1—2400 


2 








2 










































i 1—2500 


2 






1 


1 










































' L and over 


5 






4 


1 









































V total of five seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior high school 
cu ulum (two in Allegany, three in Carroll) are included in the number of elementary schools but excluded from 
th amber of high schools. 



154 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 65— State Aid for Minimum Program*: Maryland Public Schools- 
Grades 1-12: Year Ending June 30, i957 



County 


Cost OF Minimum Program 


State Aid for 
Minimum Program 


Total 


Minimum 
Salaries 


Other 
Ciirrent 
Expense 

Costs 


Trans- 
portation 


Amount 


Per Cent 




$92,727,820 


$68,779,815 


$17,194,954 


$6,753,051 


$40,710,889 


43 


9 


Allegan V 


3,428,174 


2,491,822 


622,955 


313,397 


2,249,324 


65 


6 


Anne Arundel. . . 


5,948,722 


4,333,362 


1,083,341 


532,019 


3,849,727 


64 




Baltimore City . . 


24,368,500 


19,446,800 


4,<^61,700 


60,000 


5,777,820 


23 


7 


Baltimore 


12,217,057 


9,053,012 


2,263,253 


900,792 


2,889,358 


23 


7 


Calvert 


807,470 


513,656 


128,414 


165,400 


642,336 


79 


5 




991,369 


671,321 


167,830 


152,218 


734,653 


74 


1 


Carroll 


2,012,469 


1,436,717 


359,179 


216,573 


1,172,370 


58 


3 


Cecil 


1,811,725 


1,286,063 


321,516 


204,146 


1,158,882 


64 





Charles 


1,427,574 


967,255 


241,814 


218,505 


1,127,752 


79 







1,284,059 


871,270 


217,817 


194,972 


766,360 


59 


7 


Frederick 


2,511,235 


1,778,575 


444,644 


288,016 


1,446,058 


57 


6 


Garrett 


1,217,001 


739,188 


184,797 


293,016 


975,599 


80 


2 


Harford 


2,847,368 


1,901,399 


475,350 


470,614 


1,752,245 


61 


5 




1,289,472 


890,360 


222,590 


176,522 


834,946 


64 


7 


Kent 


737,273 


490,487 


122,622 


124,164 


501,866 


68 


1 


Montgomery .... 


9,962,852 


7,515,055 


1,878,764 


569,033 


3,178,554 


31 


9 


Prince George's . 


9,421,010 


7.117,779 


1,779,445 


523,786 


5,148,598 


54 


7 


Queen Anne's. . . 


850,029 


546,540 


136,635 


166,854 


553,590 


65 


1 


St. Mary's 


1,012,400 


656,610 


164,153 


191,637 


723,698 


71 


5 


Somerset 


971,058 


668,150 


167,037 


135,871 


786,247 


81 





Talbot 


905,5.54 


630,726 


157,681 


117,177 


532,789 


58 


8 




3,669,863 


2,710,627 


677,657 


281,579 


2,081,263 


56 






1,857,174 


1,283,164 


320,791 


253,219 


1,151,994 


62 







1,178,387 


779,877 


194,969 


203,541 


674,860 


57 


3 



• The minimum program in calculating State Equalization aid includes the following: 

(a) total minimum salaries of the allowed number of teachers and principals as determined by State 

law; 

(b) other current expense including the cost of operation and maintenance and the cost of instruction 

other than the salaries of teachers, principals, and supervisors; and 

(c) the cost of approved transportation public schools. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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156 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 67— Source of Current Expenses*: Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1957 













Per Cent 


FROM Each Source 




Total 






Local Levy 














County 


Current 


State 


Federal 


and Other 




State 








Local 




Funds 






Local Sources 












Levy 


















Fed- 


and 












Equal- 






eral 


Other 












ization 


Other 


Total 






Local 












Fund 










Source 


Total Statet 


$146,970,880 


$54,309,097 


$7,001,761 


$85,660,022 


13.5 


23.4 


36.9 


4 


8 


58.3 


Allegany 


4,298,809 


2.318.430 


120,748 


1,859,631 


36.4 


17.5 


53.9 


2 


8 


43.3 


Anne Arundel 


6,939,061 


3,918,722 


521,834 


2,498,505 


35.5 


21.0 


56.5 


7 


5 


36.0 


Baltimore City{ 


44,262,123 


9,671,630 


718,474 


33,872,019 




21.9 


21.9 


1 


6 


76.5 


Baltimore 


18,801,520 


3.175,775 


488,603 


15,137,142 


a 


16.9 


16.9 


2 


6 


80.5 


Calvert 


967,245 


664,878 


39,163 


263.204 


50.3 


18.5 


68.8 


4 





27.2 


Caroline 


1,152,245 


753,677 


17.173 


381,395 


48.0 


17.4 


65.4 


1 


5 


33.1 


CarroU 


2,340,744 


1,198,119 


54.513 


1,088.112 


31.5 


19.7 


51.2 


2 


3 


46.5 


Cecil 


2,309.633 


1,201.187 


265.033 


843.413 


33.9 


18.1 


52.0 


11 


5 


36.5 


Charles 


1,788,848 


1.149.909 


194.839 


444,100 


46.9 


17.4 


64.3 


10 


9 


24.8 


Dorchester 


1,472.897 


788.734 


22.344 


661.819 


35.6 


18.0 


53.6 


1 


5 


44.9 




3,034,146 


1.452.544 


158,355 


1.423.247 


29.1 


18.8 


47.9 


5 


2 


46.9 


Garrett 


1,296,065 


998.192 


27.627 


270.246 


59.6 


17.4 


77.0 


2 


1 


20.9 


Harford 


3,497,633 


1.802.600 


646,319 


1.048.714 


33.1 


18.4 


51.5 


18 


5 


30.0 


Howard 


1,563,818 


867,794 


74,600 


621,424 


36.9 


18.6 


55.5 


4 


8 


39.7 


Kent 


877,507 


526.076 


20,426 


331.005 


41.5 


18.5 


60.0 


2 


3 


37.7 


Montgomery 


17,362,326 


3.479,387 


1,481,792 


12.401,147 


4.8 


15.2 


20.0 


8 


6 


71.4 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


13.641.633 


5,352,238 


1,508,627 


6,780,768 


21.5 


17.7 


39.2 


11 


1 


49.7 


1.001.670 


576,301 


21,609 


403,760 


40.1 


17.4 


57.5 


2 


2 


40.3 


St. Mary's 


1,273.269 


746,965 


228,588 


297,716 


40.0 


18.7 


58.7 


17 


9 


23.4 


Somerset 


1,058.515 


808,838 


9.496 


240,181 


56.6 


19.8 


76.4 





9 


22.7 


Talbot 


1.034,825 


553,846 


16.113 


464,866 


34.8 


18.7 


53.5 


1 


6 


44.9 


Washington 


5,131,613 


2,186,354 


299,562 


2,645,697 


26.0 


16.6 


42.6 


5 


8 


51.6 


Wicomico 


2,260.687 


1,184,658 


38,498 


1,037.531 


34.3 


18.1 


52.4 


1 


7 


45.9 


Worcester 


1,374,723 


702,918 


27,425 


644.380 


33.0 


18.1 


51.1 


2 





46.9 



* Includes payments applicable to the preceding year received after June 30. 1956 and excludes those for the current year receiv 
after June 30, 1957. 

t Includes $11,295,455 for Teachers' Retirement System as follows: $2,746,144 State money and $319,976 local money in Baltimc 
City; balance of $8,229,325 (including $50,786 for related expense account) State money not distributed to the twenty-three count 
in thb table. 

I Includes $2,746,144 State money and $3id,976 local money for retirement of teachers. 
a Less than 0.1 per cent. 



Maryland State Department of Education 157 



VBLE 68 — Per Cent Distribution of School Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of 
Education: Year Ending June 30, 1957 





Current Expenses 












Books, 








Fixed 










Salaries 


Materials, 








Charges 










of 


and 






Other 


and 


Capital 


County 


Adminis- 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


Mainten- 


School 


Payments 


Outlay* 




tration 


vision 


and 


Costs of 




ance 


Services 


to Ad- 








Teachers 


Instruc- 








joining 












tion 








Units 




INCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 


cal State 


2.3 


1.6 


61.6 


5.5 


8.0 


4.1 


8.4 


t8.5 


$25.95 


Allegany 


1.9 


1.7 


67.1 


4.0 


7.8 


3.6 


12.4 


1.5 


22.87 


^nne Arundel . . 


2.8 


2.0 


64.8 


6.0 


8.2 


3.8 


10.6 


1.8 


32.75 


Baltimore City . 


O Q 
£. . O 


Q n 
s. . u 


Q 

DO . y 


. o 






5 . 1 


t7 .2 


13.79 


Baltimore 


2.3 


1.9 


66.3 


7.7 


8.1 


5.6 


7.3 


0.8 


38.35 


;^alvert 


3.0 


1.9 


58.5 


4.9 


5.7 


5.8 


19.2 


1.0 


3.94 


;;aroline 


3.2 


1.5 


63.6 


4.4 


4.9 


5.8 


15.5 


1.1 


5.93 


!;;arroll 


1.8 


2.1 


68.8 


4.4 


6.5 


2.9 


12.2 


1.3 


24.08 


:;ecil 


2.3 


1.8 


64.7 


5.4 


8.7 


4.9 


11.2 


1.0 


36.50 


Charles 


2.5 


1.4 


62.7 


5.5 


9.9 


2.2 


14.6 


1.2 


11.20 


">orchester 


2.0 


1.3 


62.9 


3.3 


8.9 


4.2 


15.4 


2.0 


23.27 




2.2 


1.4 


66.3 


5.3 


7.5 


3.6 


12.3 


1.4 


28.70 


rarrett 


2.1 


1,3 


59.8 


3.1 


4.9 


3.4 


22.8 


2.6 


18.73 


[arford 


3.0 


1.1 


57.4 


5.6 


9.5 


5.1 


17.1 


1.2 


14.22 




1.9 


1.6 


67.3 


3.8 


6.2 


3.4 


15.2 


0.6 


21.89 


lent 


3.4 


2.0 


62.6 


4.7 


6.3 


3.4 


16.6 


1.0 


22.23 


lontgomery , . . 


2.7 


1.4 


65.4 


6.9 


9.6 


4.4 


9.1 


0.5 


34.89 


rince George's . 


1.9 


1.5 


66.0 


6.2 


10.4 


5.2 


7.4 


1.4 


35.13 


ueen Anne's . . . 


2.6 


1.7 


61.4 


3.9 


6.5 


3.2 


18.9 


1.8 


27.96 




2.7 


13 


55.8 


5.1 


8.3 


8.0 


17.9 


0.9 


19.41 




2.1 


1.8 


67.0 


2.3 


6.1 


4.3 


14.5 


1.9 


10.55 


albot 


3.0 


1.6 


68.5 


3.6 


8.2 


1.4 


13.2 


0.5 


27.60 


Yashington .... 


3.0 


1.7 


62.7 


6.7 


7 9 


5.6 


10.4 


2.0 


38.91 


/^icomico 


1.6 


1.1 


64.9 


6.3 


6.5 


3.4 


14.3 


1.9 


22.27 


'Worcester 


2.6 


1.9 


61.8 


4.3 


7.8 


3.5 


16.3 


1.8 


30.37 



EXCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



al State 


2 


4 


1 


7 


64 


6 


5 


8 


8 


4 


4 


3 


3 


9 


t8 


9 


$26.65 


Uegany 


2 


1 


1 


9 


72 


9 


4 


3 


8 


5 


3 


9 


4 


8 


1 


6 


24.36 


nne Arundel . . 


3 





2 


2 


69 


9 


6 


5 


8 


9 


4 




3 


4 


2 





34.47 


altimore City . . 


2 


3 


2 





66 


1 


5 


3 


8 


5 


3 


7 


4 


9 


t7 


2 


13.82 


altimore 


2 


4 


2 





69 


5 


8 





8 


6 


5 


8 


2 


8 





9 


39.47 


alvert 


3 


7 


2 


4 


70 


8 


5 


9 


6 


8 


7 





2 


2 


1 


2 


4.72 


aroline 


3 


7 


1 


8 


73 


3 


5 


1 


5 


6 


6 


7 


2 


5 


1 


3 


6.77 


arroU 


2 





2 


3 


75 


8 


4 


8 


7 


1 


3 


2 


3 


3 


1 


5 


25.90 


ecil 


2 


6 


2 





71 


1 


6 





9 


6 


5 


3 


2 


3 


1 


1 


38.72 


harles 


2 


8 


1 


7 


71 


6 


6 


2 


11 


3 


2 


5 


2 


5 


1 


4 


12.59 


orchester 


2 


3 


1 


5 


72 


7 


3 


9 


10 


3 


4 


9 


2 


1 


2 


3 


25.97 


•ederick 


2 


4 


1 


5 


73 


3 


5 


9 


8 


3 


4 





3 





1 


6 


30.81 


arrett 


2 


7 


1 


7 


75 





3 


9 


6 




4 


2 


3 


1 


3 


3 


22.42 


arford 


3 


5 


1 


2 


66 


2 


6 


5 


11 





5 


9 


4 


3 


1 


4 


16.06 


oward 


2 


1 




8 


76 





4 


3 


7 





3 


9 


4 


2 





7 


24.04 


ent 


4 





2 


4 


72 


9 


5 


5 


7 


3 


3 


9 


2 


9 


1 


1 


24.98 


ontgomery . . . 


2 


8 


1 


5 


68 





7 


2 


10 





4 


6 


5 


4 





5 


35.78 


ince George's . 
leen Anne's. . . 


2 





1 


5 


68 


8 


6 


4 


10 


9 


5 


5 


3 


5 


1 


4 


36.08 


3 


1 


2 





73 


7 


4 


6 


7 


8 


3 


9 


2 


7 


2 


2 


31.78 


. Mary's ... . 


3 


2 


1 


6 


66 





6 





9 


8 


9 


5 


2 


8 


1 


1 


2^.19 


imerset 


2 


5 


2 


1 


77 





2 


6 


7 





5 





1 


7 


2 


1 


11.94 


ilbot 


3 


4 


1 


8 


77 


1 


4 


1 


9 


2 


1 


6 


2 


3 





5 


30.03 


ashington .... 


3 


2 


1 


8 


66 


2 


7 





8 


4 


6 





5 


3 


2 


1 


40.23 


icomico 


1 


8 


1 


3 


73 


1 


7 


1 


7 


4 


3 


9 


3 


3 


2 


1 


24.42 


orcester 


3 


1 


2 


2 


72 


6 


5 


1 


9 


1 


4 


2 


1 


6 


2 


1 


33.87 



Percentages obtained by dividing capital outlay by the sum of capital outlay and current expenses 
e: uding debt service. 

Appropriations of State and Baltimore City funds for the retirement of teachers are included. Ra- 
ti nent for county teachers not distributed to the counties in this column. 



158 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 69 — Cost per Public Day School Pupil Belonging: Current Expenses: 
Counties of Maryland : 1923-1957 



Cost per Pupil Belonging for Current 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Expenses 


Total* 


Elementary 


High 


1923 


$ 43.00 


$ 34.84 


$ 90.79 


1928 


52.62 


42.91 


93.51 


1933 


51.89 


42.51 


79.32 


1938 


61.12 


50.70 


87.5'J 


1943 


71.16 


60.39 


100.46 


1948 


157.30 


124.19 


194.71 


1949 


172 47 


133.08 


207.84 


1950 


176.92 


137.60 


208.07 


1951 


186.34 


141.80 


214.60 


1952 


206.80 


162.26 


240.20 


1953 


216.17 


172.94 


246.25 


1954 


226.44 


181.55 


252.69 


1955 


242.47 


200.26 


260.41 


1956 


261.58 


215.59 


286.13 


1957 


265.61 


234.41 


299.29 



* Administration, fixed charges, and kindergartens are included in the total but excluded from ele- 
mentary and high costs. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



159 



Cvj »-i t> «5 1-1 lO OC 05 OS t> O CO 05 05 X lO o oc ^ o> <-i 

in ^Daiict>i> ^oicxoc coospjcicc oc^o-occd !o-^_asco 

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X cD-^xc-t- x-^cot^~to o:t>«ocox xioorfco coxmo 

C<I (N IM OJ <N CM eg CM CM eg eg CM CO CM 5g CO CM CM CM CM CM CM 



coiocoTf ocooio—i t-eci-"*^ uocoxxu; 

cocomxeo t-ooi'-ico ooot-os^ tvoxaseo 

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in eg «o in CO in Tj< eginT}<inco in-^c^co'* 

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CM coi-iococ- o-negoio ot>xxeg 

eg 05-^'^eo-*_ coeooicco i>incgino5 

CD cDcoincot> cDeoT)«'o>c-^ -^tincgcoco 

05 XCO^CDX t-c-xt-x coxc-t-^ 

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^^^^ 



160 Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 71 — Cost per Pupil Belonging: Current Expenses*: Maryland Public 
Day Schools : Year Ending June 30, 1957 



County 


Total t 


All Schools 
Elementary 


High 


Administra- 
tion 


Fixed 
Charges 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Total State 


$270.79 




$231.35 




$309.34 




$6.82 




$2.41 






268.61 


12 


233.52 


9 


289.21 


18 


5.42 


18 


4.16 


6 


Anne Arundel. . . 


241.97 


22 


213.57 


22 


261.97 


24 


6.22 


15 


4.06 


7 


Baltimore City . . 


274.47 


9 


223.86 


13 


334.16 


3 


7.25 


10 


0.79 


24 


Baltimore 


270.81 


11 


237.55 


6 


301.13 


14 


6.33 


13 


2.28 


19 


Calvert 


271.72 


10 


224.60 


12 


325.47 


6 


8.39 


5 


2.65 


18 


Caroline 


285.15 


4 


237.35 


7 


324.40 


7 


9.19 


3 


3.23 


11 


Carroll 


240.75 


23 


189.18 


24 


292.25 


17 


4.53 


23 


3.18 


12 




267!58 


13 


219!62 


16 


325!87 


5 


6!32 


14 


2!81 


16 




277.89 


6 


261.12 


2 


276.96 


21 


6.99 


11 


3.54 


9 


Dorchester 


261.89 


17 


213.95 


21 


304.08 


12 


5.35 


19 


5.01 


3 


Frederick 


234.37 


24 


194.02 


23 


271.93 


22 


5.24 


20 


2.84 


15 


Garrett 


275.90 


8 


253.57 


3 


284.72 


20 


6.08 


16 


2.97 


14 




267.26 


14 


231.38 


10 


297.22 


15 


7.50 


8 


3.04 


13 




264.94 


16 


219.81 


15 


315.84 


10 


5.23 


21 


0.96 


23 


Kent 


284.69 


5 


233.69 


8 


327.87 


4 


9.87 


1 


2.81 


17 


Montgomery . . . 


312.44 


1 


285.12 


1 


330.80 


2 


9.24 


2 


1.50 


21 


Prince George's . 


250.28 


20 


215.88 


19 


285.58 


19 


4.87 


22 


3.50 


10 


Queen Anne's. . . 


300.75 




243.36 


4 


353.37 


1 


7.93 


7 


5.13 


2 


St. Mary's 


243.80 


21 


219.02 


18 


265.65 


23 


6.77 


12 


2.23 


20 


Somerset 


260.68 


18 


215.68 


20 


302.84 


13 


5.60 


17 


4.62 


5 


Talbot 


266.61 


15 


223.45 


14 


306.94 


11 


8.16 


6 


1.11 


22 


Washington .... 
Wicomico 


286.28 


3 


242.29 


5 


315.88 


9 


9.17 


4 


5.94 


1 


255.94 


19 


219.55 


17 


292.31 


16 


4.26 


24 


4.01 


8 


Worcester 


27. .31 


7 


228.25 


11 


324.35 


8 


7.39 


9 


4.97 


4 



* Excludes nursery schools, home teaching of handicapped children, junior colleges, adult education, 
veterans' training, and federal funds for school lunches. Also excludes kindergartens and Teachers' 
Retirement System — per pupil costs of which are shown below: 



Per Pupil Costt 



County 



Total 
I-icluding 

Kindergar- 
tens and 

Retirement 



Teachers' 
Retirement 
System 
only 



Total State 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Montgomery. . 
W asl.i.igton . . . 



$286.52 

280.56 
270.71 
287.09 
9.82.49 



$22.47 
20.11 



t Expenditures for administration and fixed charges are included here but excluded from elementary 
and high costs. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



161 



TABLE 72 — Cost per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Day Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1957 







Instructional Service 










Total 




Salaries of 








Other 


County 


Current 


Super- 


Principals 




Operation 


Mainte- 


School 




Expenses* 


vision t 


and 


Other 




nance 


Services 






Teachers 




- 






Total State 


$261.56 


$4.99 


$186.59 


$14.80 


$24.47 


$12.49 


$18.22 


Allegany 


259.03 


4.77 


185.83 


10.66 


21.53 


9.88 


26.36 


Anne Arundel .... 


231.69 


4.42 


168.68 


12.61 


18.23 


8.37 


19.38 


Baltimore City . . . 


266.43 


6.23 


201.51 


12.84 


26.92 


11.83 


7.10 




262.20 


5.28 


183.74 


19.48 


22.62 


15.46 


15.62 


Calvert 


260.68 


5.37 


161.14 


12.95 


15.56 


15.96 


49.70 




272.73 


4.40 


184.29 


12.32 


14.12 


16.79 


40.81 


Carroll 


233.04 


5.11 


169.29 


10.40 


15.87 


7.18 


25.19 


Cecil 


258.45 


4.81 


175.83 


14.39 


23.72 


13.17 


26.53 




267.36 


4.08 


176.51 


15.08 


27.73 


6.14 


37.82 




251.53 


3.48 


167.10 


8.54 


23.62 


11.19 


37.60 


Frederick 


226.29 


3.32 


159.02 


12.38 


17.99 


8.70 


24.88 


Garrett 


266.85 


3.87 


171.18 


8.60 


13.87 


9.72 


59.61 


Harford 


256.72 


2.71 


167.15 


13.22 


24.06 


12.91 


36.67 


Howard 


258.75 


4.36 


184.12 


10.17 


16.91 


9.36 


33.83 


Kent 


272.01 


5.92 


181.21 


12.74 


18.16 


9.85 


44.13 


Montgomery 


301.70 


4.80 


212.31 


21.09 


32.47 


15.00 


16.03 


Prince George's . . . 


241.91 


3.83 


169.67 


14.44 


26.77 


13.47 


13.73 


Queen Anne's .... 


2^7.69 


5.06 


188.05 


11.68 


19.76 


9.95 


53.19 


St. Mary's 


234.80 


3.32 


138.34 


12.22 


20.45 


19.85 


40.62 




250.46 


4.83 


176.30 


5.85 


16.02 


11.38 


36.08 


Talbot 


257.34 


4.29 


185.67 


9.46 


22.24 


3.77 


31.91 




273.17 


5.14 


186.73 


19.79 


23.95 


17.01 


20.55 




247.67 


2.95 


170.43 


15.04 


17.18 


9.01 


33.06 




264.95 


5.31 


173.06 


11.78 


21.80 


9.91 


43.09 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, kindergartens, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XIX for basic data. 



162 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 73— Cost per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Elementary Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1957 







Instructional Service 










Total 




Salaries of 








Other 


County 


Current 


Super- 


Principals 




Operation 


Mainte- 


School 




Expenses* 


vision t 


and 


Other 




nance 


Services 








Teachers 










Total State 


$231.35 


$4.78 


$164.23 


$12.54 


$21.47 


$12.18 


$16.15 


Allegany 


233.52 


3.97 


165.63 


10.09 


19.08 


9.11 


25.64 


Anne Arundel .... 


213.57 


3.83 


156.69 


10.75 


18.46 


7.36 


16.48 


Baltimore City . . . 


223.86 


6.16 


167.69 


11.61 


21.16 


10.89 


6.35 


Baltimore 


237.55 


5.19 


168.72 


16.75 


20.47 


16.39 


10.03 


Calvert 


224.60 


5.54 


138.90 


10.41 


14.62 


14.40 


40.73 


Caroline 


237.35 


4.24 


155.54 


7.94 


13.54 


16.28 


39.81 


Carroll 


189.18 


4.46 


138.97 


5.54 


11.92 


4.80 


23.49 


Cecil 


219.62 


2.52 


150.32 


10.79 


21.72 


9.42 


24.85 


Charles 


261.12 


3.22 


176.52 


15.08 


24.10 


5.34 


36.86 


Dorchester 


213.95 


zm 


143.47 


6.08 


18.46 


8.70 


33.32 


Frederick 


194.02 


3.14 


132.56 


10.26 


17.71 


8.66 


21.69 


Garrett 


253.57 


4.37 


162.76 


5.85 


13.17 


9.72 


57.70 


Harford 


231.38 


2.56 


149.84 


10.18 


18.95 


11.28 


38.57 


Howard 


219.81 


3.32 


152.90 


6.77 


15.56 


8.16 


33.10 


Kent 


233.69 


5.93 


150.42 


9.53 


17.64 


7.67 


42.50 


Montgomery 


285.12 


4.87 


198.75 


17.26 


31.64 


15.78 


16.82 


Prince George's . . 


215.88 


3.67 


152.24 


12.34 


23.32 


13.94 


10.37 


Queen Anne's .... 


243.36 


5.29 


153.18 


8.50 


16.26 


9.38 


50.75 


St. Mary's 


219.02 


3.83 


122.99 


10.83 


20.85 


20.86 


39.66 


Somerset 


215.68 


3.98 


149.39 


5.01 


13.23 


10.83 


33.24 


Talbot 


223.45 


3.48 


159.45 


6.71 


19.00 


3.16 


31.65 


Washington 


242.29 


4.14 


162.86 


14.85 


23.98 


17.14 


19.32 


Wicomico 


219.55 


3.64 


151.87 


12.16 


13.50 


7.72 


30.66 


Worcester 


228.25 


4.94 


146.73 • 


9.75 


19.02 


10.25 


37.56 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, kindergartens, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XX for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



163 



TABLE 74— Cost per Puoil Belonging: Maryland Public High Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1957 



County 


1 otal 
Current 
Expenses* 


Instructional Service 

Salaries of | 
Super- ' Principals 
vision! and Other 
i Teachers 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance 


• Jtner 
School 

Services 


Total State 


$309.34 


$5.33 


$221.96 


$18.37 


$29.21 


$12.99 


$21.48 




289.21 


5.70 


209.75 


11.34 


24.41 


10.79 


27.22 


Anne Arundel .... 


261.97 


5.42 


188.73 


15.70 


17.83 


10.06 


24.23 


Baltimore City . . . 


334.16 


6.36 


255.31 


14.80 


36.09 


13.31 


8.29 




301.13 


5.40 


207.46 


23.79 


26.02 


14.00 


24.46 


Calvert 


325.47 


5.06 


201.07 


17.51 


17.27 


18.76 


65.80 




324.40 


4.64 


226.28 


18.70 


14.97 


17..54 


42.27 


Carroll 


292.25 


5.98 


210.23 


16.94 


21.20 


10.40 


27.50 


Cecil 


325.87 


8.80 


220.11 


20.64 


27.20 


19.68 


29.44 


Charles 


276.96 


5.41 


176.48 


15.07 


33.33 


7.38 


39.29 


Dorchester 


304.08 


2.87 


200.15 


11.97 


30.84 


14.68 


43.57 


Frederick 


271.93 


3.57 


196.43 


15.39 


18.39 


8.75 


29.40 


Garrett 


284.72 


3.20 


182.51 


12.29 


14.81 


9.72 


62.19 




297.22 


2.95 


194.81 


18.07 


32.22 


15.52 


33.65 


Howard 


315.84 


5.88 


229.89 


15.14 


18.89 


11.13 


34.91 


Kent 


327.87 


5.92 


226.09 


17.41 


18.92 


13.03 


46.50 


Montgomery ... . 


330.80 


4.67 


236.10 


27.80 


33.92 


13.64 


14.67 


Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne's .... 


285.58 


4.09 


198.93 


17.97 


32.54 


12.68 


19.37 


?,o3.37 


4.72 


239.72 


16.40 


24.94 


10.79 


56.80 


St. Marv's 


265.65 


2.33 


168.35 


14.94 


19.66 


17.88 


42.49 




302.84 


6.10 


216.81 


7.13 


20.24 


12.20 


40.36 


Talbot 


306.94 


5.48 


224.04 


13.50 


26.99 


4.65 


32.28 


Washington 


315.88 


6.53 


219.75 


26.63 


23.91 


16.83 


22.23 


Wicomico 


292.31 


1.84 


199.88 


19.62 


23.04 


11.07 


36.86 


Worcester 


324.35 


5.91 


215.66 


15.07 


26.31 


9.36 


52.04 



t E.xcludes administration, fi.xed charges, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XXI for basic data. 



164 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 75 — Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal : 
Public Schools of Maryland : 1923-1957 





Average Annual Salary per Teacher and 






Principal 




Year Ending 








June 30 


Total 


Elementary 


High 


1923 


$ 1.243 


$ 1 156 


$ 1,671 


1928 


1,408 


1,320 


1,830 


1933 


1,453 


1,398 


1.659 


1938 


1,556 


1.487 


1,784 


1943 


1,775 


1,648 


1,994 


1948 


3,299 


3,216 


3,403 


1949 


^,376 


3,217 


3,591 


1950 


3,569 


3,513 


3,640 


1951 


3,621 


3,601 


3,646 


1952 


3,886 


3,858 


3,919 


1953 


3,947 


3,891 


4,019 


1954 


4,093 


4,020 


4,186 


1955 


4,163 


4,104 


4,237 


1956 


4,465 


4,450 


4,482 


1957 


4,719 


4,684 


4,760 



Maryland State Department of Education 



165 



TABLE 76 — Average Salary* per Teacher and Principal: Maryland Public Schools 

Year Ending June 30, 1957 



County 


All Schools 


Elementary 


High 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 

cip3.1s j" 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipalsf 


Total State 


$4,719 


$4,604 


$6,976 


$4,684 


$4,543 


$6,705 


$4,760 


$4,673 


$7,705 


Allegany 


4,551 


4,468 


6,015 


4,498 


4,396 


5,700 


4,602 


4,532 


6,770 


Anne Arundel . . 


4,283 


4,192 


5,980 


4,250 


4,126 


5,777 


4,331 


4,279 


7,160 


Baltimore City . 


5,243 


5,088 


8,476 


4,954 


4,765 


7,915 


5,583 


5,456 


9,829 




4,686 


4,570 


8,243 


4,629 


4,477 


8,065 


4,761 


4,689 


8,823 


Calvert 


3,965 


3,846 


5,246 


3,971 


3,838 


4,994 


3,957 


3,856 


6,000 


Caroline 


4,293 


4,221 


5,356 


4,478 


4,457 


4,800 


4,124 


3,955 


5,836 


Carroll 


4,114 


3,968 


8,209 


4,109 


3,843 


8,906 


4,119 


4,075 


6,447 


Cecil 


4,351 


4,254 


6,057 


4,406 


4,328 


5,760 


4,288 


4.170 


6,416 


Charles 


4,307 


4,214 


5,645 


5,103 


5,095 


5,211 


3,473 


3,299 


6,158 


Dorchester 


4,248 


4,162 


5,194 


4,268 


4,170 


4.985 


4,227 


4,155 


5,740 


Frederick 


4,263 


4,155 


6,015 


4,287 


4,035 


6,673 


4,240 


4,259 


3,418 


Garrett 


4,261 


4,211 


5,041 


4,318 


4,259 


4,994 


4,193 


4,158 


5,167 




4,313 


4,250 


5,759 


4,634 


4,589 


5,407 


3,975 


3,904 


6,514 


Howard 


4,304 


4,190 


6,397 


4,202 


4,025 


6,547 


4,408 


4,351 


6,075 


Kent 


4,150 


4,030 


5,928 


4,206 


4,127 


5,140 


4,097 


3,942 


7,121 


Montgomery . . . 


5,032 


4,930 


7,266 


5,388 


5,285 


6,954 


4,586 


4,503 


8,413 


Prince George's . 


4,461 


4,348 


6,613 


4,423 


4,274 


6,410 


4,510 


4,439 


7,379 


Queen Anne's . . . 


4,257 


4,145 


5,381 


4,264 


4.144 


5,072 


4,251 


4,147 


6,075 


St. Mary's 


3,799 


3,709 


5,108 


3,790 


3,722 


4,771 


3,813 


3,689 


5,580 


Somerset 


4,044 


3,949 


5,060 


4,027 


3,954 


4,775 


4,062 


3,943 


5,386 


Talbot 


4,351 


4,251 


5,496 


4,278 


4,148 


5,235 


4,430 


4,353 


6,367 


Washington .... 


4,551 


4,463 


5,923 


4,477 


4,362 


5,702 


4,628 


4,563 


6,536 


Wicomico 


4,345 


4,25t 


5,805 


4,369 


4,275 


5,554 


4,318 


4,234 


6,367 


Worcester 


4,127 


4,049 


5,193 


4,063 


3,985 


4,830 


4,200 


4,118 


6,100 



* Grades 1 through 12 only; nursery schools, kindergartens, and junior colleges are excluded. 

t Includes all principals having two or more assistants without regard to division of time between teaching and 
administration. 



166 Ninety-First Annual Report 



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2,947 
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Ninety-First Annual Report 



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169 



TABLE 80^ -Number of Public Schools to Which Transportation Was Provided at Public 
Expense: Number of Vehicles Used: Stale of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1957 



County 


Total 
Number 
of 

Schools 


Number of Schools to Which 
Transportation Was Provided 


Number of Vehicles 


Total 


Ele- 
mentary 
Only 


Combined 
Elem. & 
High 


High 
School 
Only 


Buses Owned by 


Station 
Wagons 


County 


Con- 
tractors 


Total State 


954 


744 


547 


60 


137 


562 


1,516 


117 


Allegany 


35 


30 


21 


4 


5 




93 


16 


Anne Arundelt . . . 


66 


59 


50 




9 


'2 


146 


**5 


Baltimore City . . . 


170 


22 


16 




6 


15 


10 




Baltimore 


87 


82 


62 


2 


18 


122 


156 


'4 


Calvert 


16 


16 


13 




3 




45 


2 


Caroline 


12 


12 


6 


6 






44 


3 


Carroll 


22 


22 


11 


7 


4 


'5 


64 


**5 


Cecil 


24 


23 


14 


6 


3 


1 


62 


3 




17 


Vi 


9 


5 


3 




62 


9 


Dorchester 


31 


29 


24 




5 


1 


54 


5 


Frederick 


39 


38 


29 


5 


4 


20 


89 


3 


Garrett 


20 


20 


17 


1 


2 


2 


74 


tl6 


Harford 


23 


23 


16 


3 


4 


25 


133 


****7 


Howard 


17 


16 


10 


2 


4 




53 




Kent 


16 


16 


12 


2 


2 




38 


'2 


Montgomery 


98 , 


80 


59 


1 


20 


172 






Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne's .... 


104 


84 


63 


1 


20 


150 


30 




14 


14 


10 




4 




44 


'7 


St. Mary's 


18 


18 


13 


3 


2 




53 


16 


Somerset 


22 


19 


13 


3 


3 




48 


tl 


Talbot 


20 


20 


17 




3 


2 


34 


2 




47 


47 


35 


4 


8 


44 


50 


5 


Wicomico 


21 


20 


14 


3 


3 




74 


3 


Worcester 


17 


17 


13 


2 


2 


1 


60 


3 



* Each asterisk denotes one county-owned station wagon, 
t Excludes one horse in Garrett and one boat in Somerset. 

t Excludes elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College and bus carrying pupils there. 



170 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 81— Federal Funds Allotted and Expended in Maryland : 
Vocational Education: Year Ending June 30, 1957 



Type of 
Vocational Program 


Balance, 
July 1, 1956 


1956-57 
Allotment 


1956-57 
Expenditures 


Balance, 
June 30, 1957 


Total 

Home Economics 


$14,374 
14,374 


$441,416 

118,197 
165,091 
104,346 
15,631 
38,151 


$442,912 

118.159 
168,100 
104,346 
14,156 
38,151 


$12,878 

38 
11,365 


Teacher Training and Supervision 




1,475 









TABLE 82 — Expenditures for Administration and Supervision and Teacher Training 
in Vocational Education : State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1957 



Source of Expenditures 




Type of 


Vocational Program 




















Trades and 


Home 


Distributive 




Total 


Agriculture 


Industry 


Economics 


Occupations 


Total 












State and University Funds . . . 


$35,092 


$11,791 


$10,356 


$12,164 


$781 


Federal Funds 


34,704 


11,756 


10,301 


11,878 


769 


State Administration and 












Supervision 












State Funds 


29,054 


9,033 
8,998 


10,356 


8,884 


781 


Federal Funds 


28,921 


10,301 


8,853 


769 


Teacher Training 












University of Maryland Funds. 


6,038 


2,758 




3,280 






5,783 


2,758 




3,025 











Maryland State Department of Education 



171 



TABLE 83 — Expenditures of Federal Vocational Funds in Maryland : 
Year Ending June 30, 1957 



Type of Expenditures 



Total 

Instruction in Schools: 

Day Schools 

Adult Education 

Co-operative and Continuation 
Supervision 

Instruction by the University of 
Maryland: 

Volunteer Firemen 

Teacher Training and 

Guidance 

State Administration and 

Supervision 



Type of Vocational Program 



Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Occupations 


$442,912 


$123,527 


$171,283 


$109,951 


$38,151 


268,080 
68,471 
42,345 
24,835 


103,159 
8,612 


100,142 
26,086 
12,645 
17,632 


60,837 
33,295 


3,942 
478 
29,700 
3,262 




3,941 


4,477 
5,783 

28,921 




4,477 






2,758 
8,998 


3,025 
8,853 




10,301 


769 



172 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



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174 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 86 — Adult Education Classes: Number of Teachers and Enrollment 
by Subject : State of Maryland : 1956-57 



r^OTTMTV 


Number 
of 

Teachers 


Enrollment 


Total 


Agri- 
culture 


Home 
Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Business 
Education 


General 


Total State 


1,098 


26,438 


329 


4,602 


4,580 


6,866 


10,061 


Allegany 


22 


710 


77 


415 


64 


154 




Anne Arundel .... 


16 


475 




97 


67 


311 




Baltimore City . . . 


759 


16,527 




1,202 


3,094 


2,315 


9,916 




84 


2,029 




512 


761 


682 


74 


Calvert 


4 


71 




33 




38 




Caroline 


6 


143 




57 




86 




Carroll 


4 


95 




16 


■ 23 


56 




Cecil 


5 


203 




32 




171 




Charles 


6 


164 




63 




101 




Dorchester 


7 


152 


"50 


40 




62 




Frederick 


11 


256 




15 


18 


152 


71 


Garrett 


10 


268 


"64 


68 


21 


115 




Harford 


19 


775 




205 


64 


5f>6 






6 


114 


' 22 


30 


18 


44 




Kent 


4 


63 




30 




33 






42 


1,888 


15 


1,034 


32 


807 




Prince George's. . . 


41 


1,482 




534 


140 


808 




Queen Anne's .... 


5 


159 


39 


43 




77 




St. Mary's 












"ie 




Somerset 


S 


' 49 




' 33 






Talbot 


5 


86 


29 


14 




43 






27 


474 


33 


50 


'278 


113 




Wicomico 


« 


204 




56 




148 




Worcester 


4 


51 




23 




28 





Maryland State Department of Education 



175 



TABLE 87— Adult Education Program: 
State of Maryland : 



Title of Courses Offered: 
1956-57 



Title of Course 



AGRICULTXmE 

Agriculture 

Dairying 

Farm Machinery Repair .... 

Farm Mechanics 

Farm Practices 

Yoimg Farmers 

Total 

Home Economics 

Clothing Construction 

Cooking 

Fine Arts 

Home Crafts 

Home Economics 

Interior Decorating 

Millinery 

Rug Making 

Sewing 

Upholstering, Draperies, and 
Slip Covers 

Total 

Trades and Industry 

Aircraft ■ 

Auto Mechanics 

Blueprint Reading 

Building Trades 

Cosmetology 

Electric Code 

Electricity 

Electronics 

Industrial Safety 

Ironwork 

Machine Shop 

Mathematics 

Labor Education and 

Leadership Training 

Mechanical Drawing, 

Drafting, etc 

Oil Burner Repair 



Number of 
Classes 



21 



121 
2 
1 
4 
6 

10 
4 
4 

49 

3 

204 



Title of Course 



Trades and Industry (Cont'd) 

Plumbing 

Printing Trades 

Radio and T.V 

Related English 

Rigging 

Sheet Metal Work 

Tailoring 

Welding 

Woodworking 

Other Trades 

Total 

Distributive Education 

Advertising 

Human Relations 

Total 

Business Education 

Accounting 

Bookkeeping 

Business Education 

Business English 

Commercial Arithmetic 

Office Machines 

Office Practice 

Shorthand 

Typing 

Total 

General 

Americanization 

Drafting 

Elementary Education 

Informal Program 

Parent Education 

Public Speaking 

Secondary Education 

Woodworking 

Total 



Number of 
Classes 



7 
11 
6 
7 
2 
2 
6 
8 
8 
7 

217 



1 
14 
2 
3 
2 
6 
3 
74 
148 

253 



34 
1 
27 
69 
93 
4 
177 



408 



176 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



177 



TABLE 89 — Participation and Reimbursement Paid: Special Milk Program: 
Maryland Public Schools : 1956-57 





Number of 


Per Cent of Total 


Total Number 




Year 


Approved Schools 


Schools in State 


of One-Half 


Reimbursemen t 




Participating 


Participating 


Pints Milk 


Paid 


County 


in Program 


in Program 


Reimbursable 




1954-55 


713 


76.0 


4,209,820 


$152,384 


1955-56 


772 


82.2 


21,833,604 


820,471 


1956-57 


818 


85.6 


26,390,908 


983,689 


BY COUNTY, 1956-57 


Total State 


818 


85.6 


26,390,908 


$983,689 


Allegany 


33 


94.3 


685,496 


27,420 


Anne Arundel 


64 


97.0 


2,142,472 


83,639 


Baltimore City 


169 


99.4 


7,366,421 


266,224 


Baltimore 


74 


85.1 


4,299,196 


160,484 


Calvert 


9 


56.3 


102,678 


2,499 


Caroline 


7 


58.3 


79,214 


3,047 


Carroll 


20 


90.9 


399,451 


15,721 


Cecil 


20 


83.3 


251,170 


9,060 


Charles 


12 


70.6 


282,495 


9,622 


Dorchester 


7 


22.6 


130,545 


3,826 


Frederick 


34 


87.2 


355,813 


13,828 


Garrett 


12 


60.0 


280,909 


10,456 


Harford 


23 


100.0 


819,387 


32,070 




17 


100.0 


603,044 


23,396 


Kent 


16 


100.0 


204,018 


4,965 


Montgomery 


96 


97.9 


3,383,286 


127,164 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


100 


96.1 


3,447,254 


134,622 


13 


92.9 


118,521 


4,561 


St. Mary's 


11 


61.1 


170,332 


5,946 


Somerset 


6 


27.3 


51,662 


1,810 


Talbot 


8 


40.0 


134,638 


4,769 




44 


93.6 


618,647 


24,052 




21 


100.0 


437,635 


13,774 


Worcester 


2 


11.8 


26,624 


734 



178 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



179 



TABLE 91 — Participation and Types of Lunches Served: National School Lunch 
Program: Maryland Public Schools 1956-57 





Number of 


Per Cent of 




Per Cent of 


Total 




Approved 


Total Schools 


Average 


Total Average 


Number of 




Schools 


in State 


Daily 


Number Be- 


Type A* 


County 


Participating 


Particioating 


Participation 


longing in State 


Lunches 




in Program 


in Program 




Participating 


Served 










in Program 




Total State 


649 


67.9 


136,639 


27.2 


22,599,007 


Allegany 


33 


94 3 


11 220 


72 3 


1 851,637 


Anne Arundel . . . 


51 


77^3 


6^624 


21 1 


l!067!l64 


Baltimore City . . 


79 


46.5 


11,880 


7.8 


2,027,143 


Baltimore 


68 


78.2 


19,950 


29.4 


3,345,124 


Calvert 


5 


31.3 


578 


16.5 


94,287 


Caroline 


6 


50.0 


1,663 


41.8 


273,981 


Carroll 


20 


90.9 


4,309 


45.3 


723,914 


Cecil 


17 


70.8 


3,444 


40.5 


569,687 


Charles 


9 


52.9 


1,246 


19.6 


203,589 


Dorchester 


12 


38.7 


1,993 


35.9 


326,155 


Frederick 


27 


69.2 


6,170 


48.7 


1,030,093 


Garrett 


9 


45.0 


2,006 


43.6 


334,970 


Harford 


21 


91.3 


7,285 


52.5 


1,204,517 


Howard 


16 


94.1 


2,555 


44.6 


423,003 


Kent... . 


6 


37.5 


597 


19.7 


97,979 1 


Montgomery .... 


86 


87.7 


16,882 


29.2 


2,764,919 


Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


86 


82.7 


19,296 


36.3 


3,196,446 


10 


71.4 


1,700 


51.9 


280,794 


St. Mary's 


7 


38.9 


1,635 


31.8 


264,625 


Somerset 


7 


31.8 


917 


22.8 


153,660 


Talbot 


7 


35.0 


1,034 


27.1 


170,795 


Washington 


40 


85.1 


9,336 


53.4 


1,482,437 


Wicomico 


18 


85.7 


2,860 


33.0 


466,992 


Worcester 


9 


52 9 


1,459 


29 7 


245,096 



* Type A — ]A pt. milk, 2 oz. protein, 5i c. vegetables and or fruit, 1 serving bread, 2 tsps. butter or 
fortified margarine. 



180 Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 92— Capital Outlay* for Maryland Public Schools : Year Ending June 30, 1957 



County 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 
Baltimore City. 
Baltimore .... 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St, Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington ... 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Expenditures for Capital Outlay 



Total 


Elementary 


High 


$51,509,069 


$24,696,818 


$26,659,370 


1,274,754 
3,379,255 
7,080,239 
11,695,021 
39,641 


312,952 
2,477,600 
5,087,652 
6,505,663 
29,653 


956,867 
899,043 
1,980,486 
5,136,181 
9,988 


72,614 
742,871 
1,327,600 
225,643 
447,067 


2,306 
8,662 
147,716 
132,850 
439,768 


70,308 
734,209 
1,178,041 
92,793 
7,299 


1,223,664 
303,477 
579,735 
439,399 
250,852 


289,910 
303,121 
244,146 
13,358 
46,103 


933,754 
356 
332,589 
426,041 
204,749 


9,302,403 
7,387,855 
389,471 
306,611 
124,922 


3,727,414 
3,382,179 
379,073 
189,631 
81,672 


5,514,774 
3,998,653 
9,424 
116,980 
43,250 


394,683 
3,268,620 
653,134 
599,538 


246,257 
361,783 
191,979 
95,370 


148,426 
2,905,487 
461,155 
498,517 



• Includes purchase of additional automobiles and buses, for which see TABLE XVIII. 
T Expended for junior college building. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



181 



TABLE 93— Value* of Maryland Public School Property per Pupil Belonging: 

Year Ending June 30, 1957 



County 


Total 


Elementary 


High 
















Total 


Av^age 


_ . 


Average 


Total 


Average 






per r^upil 


Value 


per Pupil 


Value 


per Pupil 


Total State 


$422,862,503 


$841.04 


$194,686,645 


$616.42 


$228,175,858 


$1,220.50 


Allegany 


15,648,800 


1,007.84 


5,081,480 


603.93 


10,567,320 


1,485.63 


Atitip Artinriol 
niiii^ ^1 uiiiit:! . . . 


27,488,324 


878.02 


12,924,784 


659.83 


14,563,540 


1,242.73 


Baltimore Cityf 


89,098,423 


583.63 


42,685,697 


432.01 


46,412,726 


861.79 


Baltimore 


66,043,107 


973.51 


31,962,659 


769.09 


34,080,448 


1,296.77 


Calvert 


2,144,400 


610.77 


1,050,900 


466.03 


1,093,500 


870.62 


Caroline 


2,581,000 


648.65 


1,342,300 


568.29 


1,238,700 


766.05 


Carroll 


7,794,800 


818.95 


3,763,200 


688.22 


4,031,600 


995.46 


Cecil 


8,808,600 


1,037.16 


4,499,260 


834.90 


4,309,340 


1,388.32 


Charles 


6,497,950 


1,022.33 


3,042,150 


789.55 


3,455,800 


1,380.66 


Dorchester 


8,109,380 


1,461.94 


2,949,880 


912.15 


5,159,500 


2,230.65 


Frederick 


9,157,625 


722.89 


4,865,440 


655.63 


4,292,185 


818.03 


Garrett 


3,692,695 


802.93 


1,425,535 


540.56 


2,266,160 


1,156.20 


Harford 


16,244,365 


1,171.52 


6,529,365 


765.46 


9,715,000 


1,820.65 


Howard 


3,611,300 


630.35 


1,797,220 


527.66 


1,814,080 


780.92 


Kent 


2,276,200 


751.22 


1,006,300 


559.99 


1,269,900 


1,029.93 


Montgomery .... 


57,658,199 


998.88 


22,890,305 


585.70 


34,767,894 


1,865.13 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


48,550,398 


914.35 


24,593,099 


739.22 


23,957,299 


1,208.19 


3,252,585 


992.25 


1,475,360 


753.89 


1,777,225 


1,345.36 


St. Mary's 


2,659,265 


517.87 


1,803,500 


530.91 


855,765 


492.38 


Somerset 


3,i;0,420 


772.58 


850,890 


351.75 


2,259,530 


1,406.05 


Talbot 


5,084,041 


1,331.60 


1,859,755 


819.64 


3,224,286 


2,081.53 


P Washington 


16,768,666 


958.76 


8,886,333 


857.75 


7,882,333 


1,105.52 


f Wicomico 


11,871,960 


1,368.37 


5,349,483 


1,004.97 


6,522,477 


1,945.27 


Worcester 


4,710,000 


959.46 


2,050,750 


675.92 


2,659,250 


1,418.27 



* Value based on 100 per cent of the insured valuation for each school building and the equipment 
thereof. Value of sites has been excluded. 

t Baltimore City shows value of buildings and equipment as carried by the Bureau of Accounts and 
Disbursements; this valuation does not constitute the basis for insurance. 



182 



Ninety-First Annual Refort 



TABLE 94 



Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed Valuation : June 30, 19f 





School Bonded Indebtedness as of 


1956 Assessed 


Assessed 


Per Cent 






June 30, 1957 




Valuation 


Valuation 


School 










Taxable at 


per Dollar of 


Bonded 


County 








Full Rate for 


School 


Indebtednes 






County 


State 


County 


Bonded 


Is of Assesse 




Total 


Bonds 


Loan* 


Purposes 


Indebtedness 


Valuation 


Total State 


$295,761,751 


$235,241,751 


$60,520,000 


$6,719,456,146 


$23 


4.4 


Allegany 


6,874,872 


2,563,000 


4,311,872 


tl52,897,029 


22 


4.5 


Anne Arundel . 


23,753,901 


19,121,000 


4,632,901 


1257,795,676 


11 


9.2 


Baltimore City 


t66,583,000 


66,583,000 




t2,454,070,928 


37 


2.7 


Baltimore 


68,057,437 


52,735,000 


15,322,437 


11,228,328,113 


18 


5.5 


Calvert 


1,468,646 


637,000 


831,646 


20,536,608 


14 


7.1 


Caroline 


738,564 


25,000 


713,564 


31,474,683 


43 


2.3 


Carroll 


2,496,195 


800,000 


1,696,195 


102,379,755 


41 


2.4 


Cecil 


3,439,759 


2,720.000 


719.759 


80,090,830 


23 


4.3 


Charles 


1,697,116 


514,000 


1,183,116 


J36,546,793 


21 


4.6 


Dorchester .... 


4,194,636 


3,413 300 


781,336 


64,919,349 


15 


6.5 


Frederick 


4,236,679 


1,980,000 


2,256,679 


131,159,985 


31 


3.2 


Garrett 


1,936,120 


1,400,000 


536,120 


31,141,441 


16 


6.2 


Harford 


7,076,166 


6,026,000 


1,050,166 


tl35,427,843 


19 


5.2 


Howard 


2,913,810 


1,486,033 


1,427,777 


51,724,765 


18 


5.6 


Kent 


1,514,706 


1,050,000 


464,706 


28,806,865 


19 


5.3 


Montgomery . . 


42,833,732 


32,931,918 


9,901,814 


1880,267,960 


21 


4.9 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 


29,844,801 


24,520,000 


5,324,801 


541,692,000 


18 


5.5 


1,701,875 


1,222,000 


479,875 


36,310,241 


21 


4.7 


St. Mary's. . . . 


926,105 




926,105 


34,301,510 


37 


2.7 


Somerset 


1,664,635 


850,500 


814,135 


23,094,095 


14 


7.2 


Talbot 


2,212,346 


1,350,000 


862,346 


47,798,135 


22 


4.6 


Washington. . . 


11,359,955 


8,040,000 


3,319,955 


1191,946,762 


17 


5.9 


Wicomico 


6,066,695 


4,244,000 


1,822,695 


91,594,791 


15 


6.6 


Worcester 


2,170,000 


1,030,000 


1,140,000 


65,149,989 


30 


3.3 



* General School Construction Loan. 

t Includes sinking fund balance of $1,411,374. 

% Excludes valuation of Federal Housing Authority. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



183 



TABLE 95 — Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness* and Interest Payments 
per Pupil Belonging : June 30, 1957 



County 



School 
Bonded 
Indebtedness 



Interest 
Payments 



County 



School 
Bonded 
Indebtedness 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore .... 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 

Frederick 



$588.28 

422 . 77 
758.74 
436.14 
1,003.21 
418.30 

185.61 
262.26 
405.01 
267.01 
756.20 

333.97 



$13.09 

9.25 
16.60 

9.56 
24.62 
10.66 

1.97 
5.70 
7.72 
6.07 
16.38 

3.38 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington. . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$420.99 
510.32 
508.61 
499.90 

742.06 
562.07 
519.18 
180.35 
413.47 

585.74 
649 . 51 
699.25 
442.05 



* Includes General School Construction Loan. 



184 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 96 



Calculated School Tax Rates and Published Tax Rates : State of Maryland : 1956-57 



County 


Calculated 
Total 


Public Schoo 

Current 
Expenses 


L Tax Rates* 

Debt Service 
and Capital 
Outlay 


Published 
Tax Ratest 


Additional 
Rates in 
Districts and 
Incorporated 
Places! 


Total State 


$1 


51 


$1 


22 


$0 


29 














Allegany 


1 


44 


1 


13 





31 


$2 


05 


$0 


10— $1 


58 




1 


67 


al 


26 





41 




89 





35— 


1 


39 


Baltimore City° 

Baltimore" 


1 


45 


1 


31 





14 


3 


13 










1 


44 


al 


12 





32 


1 


98 












1 


72 


al 


15 





57 


1 


60 





75— 


1 


25 


Caroline 


1 


24 


1 


10 





14 


1 


50 





25— 


1 


15 


Carroll ° 


1 


08 





90 





18 


1 


65 





50— 





85 


Cecil 


1 


22 


al 


01 





21 


1 


45 





20— 


1 


33 




1 


61 


al 


28 





33 


1 


55 





50— 





80 




1 


24 





97 





27 


1 


73 





10— 


1 


25 




1 


29 


al 


02 





27 


1 


54 





10— 


1 


55 


Garrett ° 


1 


15 





91 





24 


2 


00 





40— 





90 


Harford ° 


1 


24 


aO 


99 





25 


1 


44 


1 


00— 


1 


10 




1 


34 


al 


02 





32 


1 


85 










Kent° 


1 


45 


al 


00 


.045 


1 


85 





10— 





80 


Montgomery 


1 


83 


al 


38 





50 


2 


03 





06— 


1 


00 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's° 


1 


79 


al 


28 





51 


2 


15 





10— 


1 


68 


1 


36 





98 





38 


1 


85 





20— 





95 


St. Mary's 


1 


08 


aO 


81 





27 


1 


50 




90 






1 


48 





95 





53 


1 


80 





80— 


1 


45 


Talbot 


1 


31 





95 





36 


1 


85 





20— 




25 




1 


37 


al 


25 





12 


1 


69 





35— 





85 




1 


64 





95 





69 


1 


91 





30— 


1 


12 




1 


27 


al 


01 





26 


1 


70 





90— 


1 


40 



• Calculated by dividing tax funds received by County Boards of Education by total assessed valua- 
tions as used in calculation of State aid payments. 

t Rates are for fiscal period on which district operates. State property tax and special service levies 
are excluded. 

X Figures are from reports made to State Fiscal Research Bureau. 
° Calendar year fiscal period. 

a Excludes federal fund? authorized by Public Law 874 as amended. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



185 



TABLE 97 



Local Revenue Appropriations : Maryland Public Schools : 1956-57 



County 


Local 
Revenue* 


Appropriations for Public ScHOOLsf 


Per Cent of Total Revenue Ap- 
propriated FOR Public Schools 


All ochool 
Purposes 


Current 
Expenses 


Debt 
Service 


Capital 
Outlay 


All 
School 
Purposes 


Current 
Expenses 


Debt 
ScrvicG 


Capital 
Outlay 


lal State 


$255,416,534 


$101,729,638 


$82,429,868 


$15,372,233 


$3,927,537 


39.8 


32.3 


6.0 


1.5 


Ulegany 


5,924,501 


2,252,769 


1,772,616 


451,257 


28,896 


38.0 


29.9 


7.6 


0.5 


Vnne Arundel t 


9,037,610 


4,044,524 


3,137,546 


906,978 




44.7 


34.7 


10.0 




kltimore City{ 


118,836,781 


34,935,429 


31.649,936 


3,085,493 


200,000 


29.4 


26.6 


2.6 


'0.2 


kltimoret 

^Jalvert 


32,504,657 


17,145,837 


13,753,522 


3,164,540 


227,775 


52.7 


42.3 


9.7 


0.7 


807,221 


376,003 


251,111 


99,892 


25,000 


46.6 


31.1 


12.4 


3.1 


Caroline 


1,180,193 


422,610 


374,579 


6.050 


41,981 


35.8 


31.7 


0.5 


3.6 


Carroll t 

>ecil 


3,149,197 


1,233,827 


953,347 


176,041 


104,439 


39.2 


30.3 


5.6 


3.3 


2,220,196 


1,062,960 


883,045 


163.918 


15,997 


47.9 


39.8 


7.4 


0.7 


vharles 


1,437,006 


637,331 


506,837 


115,544 


15,000 


44.3 


35.3 


8.0 


1.0 


Dorchester t 


2,207,646 


826,895 


637,504 


189,391 




37.5 


28.9 


8.6 




""rederickt 


4,506,111 


1,669,799 


1,386,166 


223,318 


60,315 


37.0 


30.8 


4.9 


1.3 


krrettt 


1,542,901 


412,908 


281,725 


101,721 


29,462 


26.8 


18.3 


6.6 


1.9 


iarfordt 


3,383,556 


1,559,671 


1,139,242 


346,296 


74,133 


46.1 


33.7 


10.2 


2.2 


iowardt 


1,628,410 


749,074 


556,250 


167,724 


25,100 


46.0 


34.2 


10.3 


1.5 


ientl 


996,595 


441,485 


308,200 


117,663 


15,622 


44.3 


30.9 


11.8 


1.6 


vlontgoraerv 

'rince George's 

Jueen Anne's J 


28,827,887 


16,564,740 


12,023,270 


2.620.881 


1,920,589 


57.5 


41.7 


9.1 


6.7 


20,828,732" 


10,169,077 


7,291,553 


2,166,521 


711,003 


48.8 


35.0 


10.4 


3.4 


1,252,593 


502,745 


373,443 


107,474 


21,828 


40.1 


29.8 


8.6 


1.7 


!t. Mary's 


1,290,449 


414,306 


311,173 


86,079 


17,054 


32.1 


24.1 


6.7 


1.3 


iomerset 


936,024 


360,529 


231,491 


109,189 


19,849 


38.5 


24.7 


11.7 


2.1 


'albot 


1,680.324 


649 204 


471,276 


153,778 


24.150 


38.6 


28.0 


9.2 


1.4 


Vashingtont 


5,504,280 


2,841,389 


2,529,317 


201,681 


110,391 


51.6 


45.9 


3.7 


2.0 


Vicomico 


3,455,142 


1,601,820 


928,960 


541,407 


131,453 


46.4 


26.9 


15.7 


3.8 


Vorcester 


2,278,522 


854,656 


677,759 


69,397 


107.500 


37.5 


29.8 


3.0 


4.7 



Figures from State Fiscal Research Bureau; include taxes, licenses and permits, and fines and forfeitures. 

Figures from annual financial reports of County Departments of Education adjusted to conform to county's fiscal period. 

County operates on calendar year. Revenue here reported is that of 1956. 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



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188 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE lOO— Assessable Wealth Back of Each Maryland Public School Pupil 

Belonging : 1956-57 





Total Basis Assessable at 


Number of 




County 


Full Rate for County 


Pupils Belonging t 


Wealth per Pupil 




Purposes 




Total State 


$6,778,651,469 


502,786 


$13,482 


Allegany 


152,935,437 


15,527 


9,850 


Anne Arundel* 


258,056,052 


31,307 


8,243 




2,508,336,658 


152,663 


16,431 


1,231,625,108 


67,840 


18,155 


Calvert 


20,536,608 


3,511 


5,849 




31,474,683 


3,979 


7,910 


Carroll* 


102,379,755 


9,518 


10,756 




80,090,830 


8,493 


9,430 


Charles 


36,607,933 


6,356 


5,759 




64,919,349 


5,547 


11,703 




131,159,985 


12,668 


10,354 


Garrett* 


31,141,441 


4,599 


6,771 


Harford* 


135,962,793 


13,866 


9,805 


Howard* 


51,724,765 


5,729 


9,029 


Kent* 


28,806,865 


3,030 


9,507 




880,662,050 


57,723 


15,257 




541,692,000 


53,098 


10,202 


36,310,241 


3,278 


11,077 


St. Mary's 


34,301,510 


5,135 


6,680 


Somerset 


23,094,095 


4,026 


5,736 


Talbot 


47,798,135 


3,818 


12,519 




192,290,396 


17,490 


10,994 




91,594,791 


8,676 


10,557 




65,149,989 


4,909 


13,271 



* Calendar year (1956). 

t Includes kindergarten and prekindergarten pupils. 



Maryland State 



Department of Education 



189 



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196 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 108 

Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1948-1957 







Current Expenses 




Average Annual Cost per 
Student 


Year 

Ending 


Average 
Enroll- 
ment 


Total 


Paid by 
Students 


Paid by 
State 




Total 


In Student 
Fees* 


To 
State 



BOWIE 



1948 


152 


$163,153 


$22,972 


$140,181 


$1,073 


$151 


$922 


1949 


157 


172,046 


28,341 


143,705 


1,096 


181 


915 


1950 


207 


212,373 


26,353 


186,020 


1,026 


127 


899 


1951 


218 


226,790 


33,750 


193,040 


1,040 


155 


885 


1952 


262 


261,264 


32,810 


228,454 


997 


125 


872 


1953 


331 


316.737 


59,506 


257,231 


957 


180 


777 


1954 


343 


351,712 


72,599 


279,113 


1,025 


211 


814 


1955 


338 


363,046 


75,092 


287,954 


1,074 


222 


852 


1956 


321 


388,296 


71,585 


316,711 


1,210 


223 


987 


1957 


301 


435,714 


70,800 


364,914 


1,447 


235 


1,212 



COPPIN 



1953 


197 


$126,542 


$5,390 


$121,152 


$642 


$27 


$615 


1954 


236 


159,193 


8,103 


151,090 


674 


34 


640 


1955 


267 


172,823 


9,625 


163,198 


647 


36 


611 


1956 


295 


199,662 


9,148 


190,514 


677 


31 


646 


1957 


289 


238,292 


10,352 


227,940 


825 


36 


789 



FROSTBURG 



1948 


225 


$210,925 


$40,024 


$170,901 


$937 


$178 


$759 


1949 


270 


236,332 


54,730 


181.602 


875 


203 


672 


1950 


374 


262.317 


50,021 


212,296 


701 


134 


567 


1951 


339 


316,664 


57,636 


259,028 


934 


170 


764 


1952 


338 


318,342 


42,462 


275.880 


942 


126 


816 


1953 


373 


402,258 


88,372 


313,886 


1,078 


237 


841 


1954 


394 


418.682 


58,716 


359,966 


1,063 


149 


914 


1955 


458 


459,180 


57,667 


401,513 


1,003 


126 


877 


1956 


564 


484,506 


65,589 


418.917 


859 


116 


743 


1957 


548 


585,568 


63,651 


521,917 


1,068 


116 


952 



SALISBURY 



1948 


273 


$191,221 


$64,408 


$126,813 


$700 


$236 


$464 


1949 


258 


231,054 


54,557 


176,497 


895 


211 


684 


1950 


286 


270,107 


55,342 


214,765 


944 


194 


750 


1951 


200 


268,942 


38,999 


229,943 


1,345 


195 


1,150 


1952 


174 


282,935 


22,765 


260.170 


1,626 


131 


1,495 


1953 


234 


349,424 


54,129 


295,295 


1,493 


231 


1,262 


1954 


250 


343,124 


41,983 


301,141 


1,372 


168 


1,204 


1955 


338 


386,826 


64,918 


321,908 


1,144 


192 


952 


1956 


362 


416,580 


68,945 


347,635 


1.151 


191 


960 


1957 


313 


450,320 


51,424 


398,896 


1,439 


164 


1,275 



TOWSON 



1948 


625 


3430,679 


$102,645 


$328,034 


$689 


$164 


$525 


1949 


750 


469.299 


84,996 


384,303 


626 


113 


513 


1950 


885 


599,879 


93,495 


506,384 


678 


106 


572 


1951 


879 


633.145 


107,164 


525,981 


720 


122 


598 


1952 


855 


757,257 


92,816 


664,441 


886 


109 


777 


1953 


851 


842,915 


121,076 


721,839 


990 


142 


848 


1954 


893 


962,662 


135,050 


827,612 


1,078 


151 


927 




1,033 


1,024,421 


173,733 


850,688 


992 


168 


824 


1956 


1,170 


1,120,202 


180,904 


939,298 


957 


154 


803 


1957 


1,233 


1,239,538 


196,399 


1,043,139 


1,005 


159 


846 



* In arrordanre with Chapter 6 of the Laws of 1945, tuition for teacher training students an the 
Tf-achers Colleges was eliminated as of September, 1945. Besjinning in 1955-56 board is $216 at Frogt- 
burg, Salisbury, Towson, and Bowie for teacher training students planning to teach in Moryland. 
Junior college students who are residents of Maryland pay $100 additional, out-of-state students, $200. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



197 



TABLE 109 — Source of Expenditures* : Maryland State Teachers Colleges : 
Year Ending June 30, 1957 











Total Expenditures fob Current 


CPENSE3 Paid by 






State 
Teachers 
College 


Grand 
Total 






General Adminis- 
tration 


Instruction 


Dietary Services 


Plant Operation 
and Mamtenance 






State 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Students 


Total 


2,949,433 
435,714 


$ 

2,556,807 


$ 

392.626 


$ 

370.346 


1 

4,815 


1 

1,409,180 


$ 

48,149 
1,340 
373 


$ 

237,438 
35,979 


$ 

236,365 
45,546 
9,500 


$ 

539.843 
104,585 
37.091 


$ 

103,297 
23,914 
480 


Bowie 


364,915 
227,940 


70,800 
10,352 


57,736 
41,553 


166,615 


Coppin 


238,293 




136,590 


12,706 


Frostburg . . . 


585,568 


521,917 


63,651 


65.007 




299,035 


3,713 


43,108 


41,700 


114,767 


18,238 


Salisbury . . . 


450,320 


398,896 


51,424 


56,375 




215,839 


1,137 


39.281 


32,249 


87,401 


18,038 


Towson 


1,239,538 


1,043,139 


196,399 


149,675 


4,815 


591,101 


41,586 


106.364 


107,370 


195,999 


42,627 



* Current year cash disbursements and encumbrances less budget credits. 



TABLE 110 — Inventories of Maryland State Department of Education, Teachers' 
Retirement System, and State Teachers Colleges ; June 30, 1957 



Department or College 


Total 


Land and 


Buildings 


Equipment 






Improvements 






Total 


$13,210,778 


$1,213,864 


$10,074,235 


$1,922,679 




305,435 






305,435 




21,516 






21,516 




2,517,937 


168,344 


2,098,648 


250,945 




948,987 


280,000 


544,360 


124,627 


State Teachers College, Frostburg .... 


3,472,978 


381,025 


2,770,136 


321,817 


State Teachers College, Salisbury 


2,013,715 


149,149 


1,603,765 


260,801 


State Teachers College, Towson 


3,930,210 


235,346 


3,057,326 


637,538 



198 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 111 — Maryland Teachers' Retirement System: Members in Active Service 
and Their Contributions : Year Ending June 30, 1957 



County or Institution 



Grand Total 

Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery (including Jr. College) . 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington (including Jr. College) . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Total Schools and Departments 

Teachers Colleges 

Bowie 

Coppin 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 

■rowson 

Departments 

County Libraries 

Education 

Retirement 

Other Schools 

Barrett School for Girls 

Md. School for the Deaf 

Md. Training School for Boys 

Montrose School for Girls 

Rosewood State Training School. . . . 
St, Mary's Seminary — Junior College 



Amount Contributed 
Year Ending 
July 31, 1957 



$3,310,053 

$3,160,524 

155,901 
246,990 
614,915 
28,634 
41,719 

75,327 
71,008 
61,345 
47,301 
91,321 

44,621 
115,013 
57,291 
31,077 
587,761 

444,322 
33,715 
32,341 
37.966 
40,022 

178,675 
77,131 
46,128 

$149,529 

$70,174 

8,385 
6,638 

14,020 
9,926 

31,205 

$51,512 

20,559 
30,685 
268 

$27,843 

1,252 
7,572 
7,957 
2,602 
2,941 
5,519 



Maryland State Department of Education 



199 



TABLE 112 — Parent-Teacher Associations: Maryland County Public Schools: 

Year Ending June 30, 1957 







Number Having 


Per Cent 


Having 


County 


Total Number 


Parent-Teacher 


Parent-Teacher 




Schools 


Associations 


Associations 


Total Counties 


786 


769 


97 


8 




35 


29 


82 


8 




66 


66 


100 







87 


87 


100 





Calvert 


16 


16 


100 





Caroline 


12 


12 


100 





Carroll 


22 


21 


95 


5 


Cecil 


24 


22 


91 


7 


Charles 


17 


17 


100 







31 


31 


100 





Frederick 


39 


36 


92 


3 


Garrett 


20 


20 


100 





Harford 


23 


23 


100 







17 


17 


100 





Kent 


16 


16 


100 





Montgomery 


98 


98 


100 







104 


104 


inn 





14 


13 


92 


9 


St. Mary's 


18 


16 


88 


9 




22 


22 


100 





Talbot : 


20 


18 


90 





Washington 


47 


47 


100 







21 


21 


100 







17 


17 


100 






200 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 113— Enrollment in Baltimore City Summer Schools: 1948-57; 
By Type cf School: 1957 









Net Roll at End of Session 




School Year 


Number 


Total 




Taking 


Number of 




of 


Enroll- 








Principals 


Type of School 


Schools 


ment 


Total 






and 










Review 


Advance 


Teachers 










Work 


Work 




All Schools 














1947-48 


12 


6,565 


6,039 


5,287 


752 


146 


1948-49* 


5 


3,686 


3,421 


2,895 


526 


86 


1949-50 


5 


4,222 


3,865 


3,275 


590 


92 


1950-51 


5 


4,010 


3,628 


2,990 


638 


78 


1951-52 


5 


4,145 


3,710 


3,258 


452 


80 


1952-53 


5 


4,234 


3,945 


3,564 


381 


80 


1953-54 


5 


4.726 


4,373 


3,954 


419 


80 


1954-55 


5 


5,454 


4,990 


4,586 


404 


84 


1955-56 


5 


5,870 


5,257 


4,943 


314 


87 


1956-57 


4 


6,385 


5,686 


5,501 


185 


88 




3 


6,249 


5,559 


5,501 


58 


82 


Demonstration. . . . 


1 


136 


127 




127 


6 



* No elementary review schools beginning 1948-49. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



201 



TABLE 114— High School Equivalence: State of Maryland: 1948-1957 





Number of Applicants Who 


Total Number 


Year Ending 








of 


June 30 








Certificates 




Completed 


Earned 


Earned Certificate 


Issued 




Examination* 


Certificate 


through USAFIt 




1948 


1,469 


1,082 


443 


1,525 


1949 


1,129 


831 


457 


1,288 


1950 


1,081 


747 


332 


1,079 


1951 


912 


648 


291 


939 


1952 


779 


527 


580 


1,107 


1953 


1,005 


700 


613 


1,313 


1954 


1,377 


887 


837 


1,724 


1955 


1,495 


885 


717 


1,602 


1956 


1,476 


854 


967 


1,821 


1957 


1,603 


954 


740 


1,694 



* Includes re-tests. 

t United States Armed Forces Institute. 



202 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 115 



Vocational Rehabilitation Services Rendered : 
Year Ending June 30, 1957 



State of Maryland 





Total 


Reha- 


Being 


Training 


Being 


Surveyed: 


Closed: 


County 


Number 


bilitated 


Followed 


Completed 


Prepared 


Under Ad- 


Other 




Cases 




on Jobs 


for Jobs 


visement 


Services 


Total State 


4,636 


1,218 


94 


525 


942 


1,275 


582 




136 


44 




25 


26 


26 


15 


Anne Arundel 


150 


37 


2 


20 


20 


52 


19 




o 1 Qn 




OD 




468 


582 


332 


Baltimore 


233 


93 


2 


11 


50 


43 


34 


Calvert 


25 


6 




2 


6 


10 


1 


Caroline 


60 


18 




5 


9 


25 


3 


Carroll 


58 


22 


2 


10 


11 


11 


2 




1 1 


1 Q 


O 


Q 
O 


1 A 
14 


27 


3 


Charles 


49 


6 


2 


5 


12 


20 


4 




81 


20 


2 


5 


16 


25 


13 




142 


57 


4 


18 


45 


18 




Garrett 


59 


13 




11 


16 


17 


'2 


Harford 


82 


25 




7 


14 


30 


6 




11 


3 


i 


3 


3 




1 


Kent 


38 


13 


6 


6 


4 


8 


1 


Montgomery 


271 


70 


5 


32 


39 


66 


59 


Prince George's 


331 


70 


10 


58 


73 


87 


33 


40 


11 


1 


6 


11 


9 


2 


St. Mary's 


45 


12 


1 


4 


8 


20 




Somerset 


45 


10 


3 


4 


12 


12 


'4 


Talbot 


40 


15 




1 


5 


13 


6 




262 


83 


7 


24 


42 


86 


20 


Wicomico 


182 


41 


4 


14 


29 


74 


20 


Worcester 


35 


7 


1 


2 


9 


14 


2 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED 



Characteristic 



Total 


Reha- 
bilitated* 


Othert 


C HAR ACTERIST IC 


Total 


Reha- 
bilitated* 


Othert 


4,636 


1,218 


3,418 


Race 








White 


3,287 


931 


2,356 










1,343 


286 


1,057 


1,074 


206 


868 


Other 


6 




5 


864 


248 


616 










1,039 


314 


725 


Sex 








921 


259 


662 


Male 


3,223 


846 


2,377 


738 


191 


547 


Female 


1,413 


372 


1,041 








Marital Status 








69 


19 


50 


Single 


2,035 


456 


1,579 


272 


57 


215 


Married 


1,781 


549 


1,232 


842 


218 


624 


Other 


820 


213 


607 


1,643 


442 


1,201 










1,108 


293 


815 


Employment 








382 


107 


275 


History 








126 


36 


90 


(at Survey) 






273 


105 


35 


70 


Employed 


505 


232 


22 


5 


17 


Unemployed. . . . 


4,131 


986 


3,145 


67 


^6 




Never Worked . 




157 


644 








Worked at 














Sometime. . . . 




829 


2,501 


2,738 


651 


2,087 










667 


168 


499 


Number on Welfare 






435 


425 


126 


299 


(at Survey) 


553 


118 


307 


118 


189 










191 


63 


128 










120 


37 


83 










188 


55 


133 











Total Number. . . 
Age 

Under 21 

21-^30 

31—40 

41—50 

Over 50 

Education 

None 

1—3 

4—6 

7—9 

10—12 

H. S. Graduate 

13—14 

15—16 

College 

Unknown 

Dependents 



1 

2 

3 

4 

• 5... 

Over 5 



• Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (1,218). 
t Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (3,418). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



203 



TABLE 116 — Cost of Vocational Rehabilitation Case Services Rendered: 
State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1957 



Type of Service 


Number of 


Average 


Total 




Clients 


Cost 


Expenditure 








$351,667 


Examinations 










1,408 


$14.73 


20,745 




28 


24.91 


698 


Psychological 


53 


31.95 


1,693 


Surgery and Treatment 










80 


34.92 


2,794 




19 


164.58 


3,127 




128 


148.70 


19,033 


Dental 


44 


134.01 


5,897 




71 


93.08 


6,609 


Prosthetic Appliances 










140 


239.89 


33,585 




81 


62.61 


5,072 




49 


130.20 


6,380 




118 


21.47 


2,533 




70 


19.45 


1,362 


Wheel chairs hand and power operated 


25 


137.47 


3,437 


Hospitalization and Convalescent Care 








Hospitalization 


150 


335.80 


50,369 


Convalescent home care 


1 


541.65 


542 




7 


134.64 


942 


Training and Training Materials 








Personal adjustment training 


97 


41.84 


4,059 


Educational institutions 


436 


176.19 


76,819 




36 


126.18 


4,542 


Correspondence 


41 


68.75 


2,819 


Tutorial 


68 


80.60 


5,481 


Training materials 


292 


33.43 


9,763 


Maintenance and Transportation 








Maintenance 








Training 


261 


219.17 


57,204 


Medical or physical restoration 


32 


99.24 


3,176 


Placement 


33 


48.25 


1,592 


Transportation 








Training 


303 


38.89 


11,784 


Medical or physical restoration 


112 


17.17 


1,923 




62 


5.74 


356 


Occupational Tools and Equipment (Clients) 


74 


92.37 


6,835 


Miscellaneous (Other) 


5 


99.16 


496 



204 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



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206 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



TABLE 119 — Amount of and per Pupil Expenditures by Boards of Education from 
Public Funds for Public School Library Books : State of Maryland : 
Year Ending June 30, 1957 



County 


Public Expenditures for School Library Books 


Amount 


Per Pupil Belonging 


Total 


Elementary 


High 


Total 


Elementary 


High 




$550,768 


$314,057 


$236,711 


$1.10 


$ .99 


$1.27 


Allegany 


9,504 


5,409 


4,095 


.61 


.64 


.57 


Anne Arundel . . . 


16,021 


8,976 


7,045 


.51 


.46 


.60 


Baltimore City. . 


92,085 


60,192 


31,893 


.60 


.61 


.59 




153,402 


84,611 


68,791 


2.26 


2.03 


2.62 


Calvert 


6,111 


3,863 


2,248 


1.74 


.63 


1.79 


Caroline 


3,619 


2,204 


1,415 


.91 


.93 


.87 


Carroll 


9,303 


3,598 


5,705 


.98 


.66 


1.41 


Cecil 


7,303 


4,075 


3,228 


.86 


.76 


1.04 


Charles"' 


8,163 


4,949 


3,214 


1.28 


1.28 


1.28 


Dorchester 


3,815 


1,537 


2,278 


.69 


.47 


.98 




17,077 


10,458 


6,619 


1.35 


1.41 


1.26 


■Garrett 


4,627 


2,793 


1,834 


1.01 


1.06 


.93 




10,363 


8,981 


1,382 


.75 


1.05 


.26 


Howard 


3,617 


1,692 


1,925 


.63 


.50 


.83 


Kent 


2,749 


1,533 


1,216 


.91 


.85 


.99 


Montgomery .... 


74,389 


36,119 


38,270 


1.29 


.92 


2.05 


Prince^Goorge's . 


64,793 


38,876 


25,917 


1.22 


1.17 


1.31 


Queen Anne's . . . 


4,359 


2,222 


2,137 


1.33 


1.13 


1.62 


St. Mary's 


2,628 


1,805 


823 


.51 


.53 


.47 


Somerset 


2,097 


1,203 


894 


.52 


.50 


.56 


Talbot 


4,019 


2,017 


2,002 


1.05 


.89 


1.29 




33,234 


17,996 


15,238 


1.90 


1.74 


2.14 


Wicomico 


12,027 


5,682 


6,345 


1.39 


1.07 


1.89 


Worcester 


5,463 


3,266 


2,197 


1.11 


1.08 


1.17 



Maryland State Department of Education 



207 



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208 



Ninety-First Annual Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Department of Education : Headquarters and Vocational 
Rehabilitation : Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1957 



Source or Purpose 


11 

Headquarters j 


Vocational 
Rehabilitation 


RECEIPTS 




$22,321 
737,117 


$8,833 
334,735 


Appropriation Cancellations and Additions 


34,444 
2,476 
2,038 
9,385 

19,770 


421,085 
*(10,796) 
3,323 




Net Transfers 


12,565 


Total Funds Available 


$827,551 


$769,745 


DISBURSEMENTS 




Departmental and 
Financial 
Admini'^tration 
$175,449 
424 
6,000 
8,715 
2,311 
14,904 
4,349 
1,835 
1,738 
34,778 


Administration 
$45,162 






525 
1,786 
401 
660 
542 
1,373 
14 
2,092 


Travel 




Equipment — Replacement 


Total 


$250,503 

Supervisory and 
Consultative 
Services 
$209,876 
12,790 
5,494 
12,460 
4,006 
14,254 
3,419 
3,574 
101 


$52,555 
Placement 

AND 

Guidance 
$236,060 
8,095 
6,479 
18,762 

193 
2,625 
1,095 
1,807 
15,164 


Salaries 




Travel 


Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 


Fixed Charges 


Total 




$265,974 

Administrative 

$131,591 
16,052 
3,914 
7,885 
829 

0,DO / 

3,572 
173 
522 


$290,280 
Case 




















Supplies and Materials 












Total 


$343,656 


$168,175 

Library 
Extension 
Services 
$58,260 
31 
2,081 
572 
204 
2,913 
1,792 
234 
20,059 
1,254 


$343,656 

Disabilities 
Determinations 
(O.A.S.L) 
$29,611 
3,540 
869 
331 

" ' ' 588 
465 
2,293 
2,316 
2,537 












Total 


$87,400 
$772,052 
9,404 


$42,550 
$729,041 




Unexpended Balance Returned to Treasury . . . 
Balance, June 30, 1957 


$781,456 
$20,269 
$25,826 


$729,041 
$15,585 
$25,119 



• Denotes red figure. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



209 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Teachers Colleges : Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1957 



Source or Purpose 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


TOWSON 


RECEIPTS 


Balance forwarded from 1955-56 . 
General Fund Appropriation .... 

Special Fund Appropriation 

Appropriation Cancellations and 

Nonbudgeted Receipts 

Total Funds Available . . 


$4,446 
360,224 
88,044 

*(15,207) 
5,223 
4,825 
23,649 


$4,481 
207,796 
10,353 

417 
36 

21,454 


$6,898 
495,605 
87,902 

*(5,352) 
5,285 
32,547 
27,955 


$9,560 
385,641 
80,310 

*(14,131) 
1,805 
13,546 
25,589 


$22,487 
982,267 
197,148 

371 
7,600 
57,526 
63,882 


$471,204 


$244,537 


$650,840 


$502,320 


$1,331,281 



DISBURSEMENTS 



General Administration 

Salaries and Wages 

Technical and Special Fees .... 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and 

Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment— Replacement .... 

Equipment — Additional 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Instruction 

Salaries and Wages 

Technical and Special Fees .... 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and 

Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement .... 

Equipment — Additional 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Dietary Services 

Salaries and Wages 

Technical and Special Fees .... 

Food 

Motor Vehicle Operati >n and 

Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement .... 

Equipment — Additional 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Plant Operation and Maintenance 

Salaries and Wages 

Technical and Special Fees .... 

Fuel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and 

Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement .... 

Equipment — Additional 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Total Program Expenditures .... 

Refunds 

Activities Association 

Athletic Association 

Application Fees 

Other 

Total Disbursements . . . 

Unexpended Balance Re- 
turned to Treasury . . . 

Balance, June 30, 1957. . 



$50,345 
1,172 
1,411 
464 

410 
1,173 
1,549 
378 
247 
712 



$57,861 



$146,849 
3,442 



820 

2,437 
250 
3,927 
4,241 
5,907 



$167,873 



$31,289 
805 
48.221 



343 
1,624 
3,530 

584 



$86,396 



$81,838 
390 
17,214 

850 
20,482 
5,052 
1,556 

118 



$127,500 

$439,630 
84 
3,085 
1,542 



113 



$444,454 

$21,327 
$5,423 



$32,158 
2,340 
1,571 
275 

641 
1,152 
1,141 



1,742 
958 



$41,978 



$115,090 
3,126 



634 



912 
3.043 



14,223 



$137,028 



$9,956 
460 
9.553 



1,345 
687 
795 



$22,796 



$20,235 
668 
3,293 

108 
14,356 
1.489 



178 



$40,327 
$242,129 



$242,129 

$1,764 
$644 



$52,466 
542 
3,162 
461 

491 
4,264 
2,121 
533 
675 
1.615 



$66,330 



$276,228 
3,278 



1,724 

1,113 
1,651 
5,788 
1,539 
10,424 



$301,745 



$37,285 
1,283 
47.416 



3,184 
' 225 



$89,393 



$84,944 
332 
8,376 



21,167 
8,926 
1,211 
4,856 



$129,812 

$587,280 
1,516 
11,774 
7,265 



11,993 



$619,828 

$20,541 
$10,471 



$47,667 
159 
2,100 
547 

489 
1,982 
1,678 



44 
1.167 



$55,833 



$190,554 
4,663 
85 
965 

856 
927 
4,832 
5,887 
7,467 



$216,236 



$33,004 
846 
37.389 



972 
1,760 



$73,971 

$60,318 

11,340 

552 
27,051 
6.331 



5,329 



$110,921 

$456,961 
715 
7,872 
4,885 



75 



$470,508 

$27,089 
$4,723 



* Denotes red figure. 

Note: Disbursements for Summer School at Towson and Salisbury are included under appropriate 
items in Instruction and Dietary Services. 



210 Ninety-First Annual Report 



Construction Accounts at Maryland State Teachers C 





Source or Purpose 


Bowie 


COPPIN 






















Balance 


Addi- 


Dis- 


3alanc6 


Balance 


Addi- 


Dis- 






July 1,' 




bursed 


June 30, 


July 1,' 




nltnaprl 






1956 ' 


Available 




1957 


1956 ' 


Available 




1 


General Construction Loan of 1949: 
















2 


















3 


(.jeneral Lonstruction Loan oi 19olr 
















4 


Boiler plant and steam distribution .... 


$2,923 






$2,923 








5 


Library building 














6 


Demonstration school 
















7 


Roads, water, and sewer 
















8 


Insulation of gymnasium ceiling 
















9 


Boiler plant, steam and electrical dis- 


































10 


General Construction Loan of 1952: 
















1 1 


Grade and establish turf for athletic field 


6,000 




$6,000 










12 
















13 


General Construction Loan oi lyoo: 
















14 


Exterior of main building and Newell 


















Hall 
















15 


Grading and parking for library 
















16 


Completion of sanitary sewer and water 
















17 


Gymnasium (no swimming pool) 


*183,98i 




146,243 


37,738 








18 


Equipment for gymnasium 


2L431 




20,165 


1,266 








19 


General Lonstruction Loan oi 1954: 
















20 


Residence hall for 100 women 


80,520 




74,384 


6,136 








21 


Equipment for residence hall 


30,000 




19,784 


10,216 








22 


Residence hall for 75 men 














23 


















24 


















25 


















OR 


















27 


Roads, walks, and parking area 
















28 


Equipment for demonstration school . . 
















29 


Library building 
















30 


Equipment for library building 
















31 


















32 


General Construction Loan oi 1955: 
















33 


Construction of roads, drainage and 




















39,160 




20,921 


18,239 








34 


Supplement residence hall for 100 women 


30,000 




3,875 


26,125 








£50 


Equipment for two dormitories 
















OD 


Grading, drainage, and site improvement 
















37 


Supplement residence hall for 75 men . . 
















38 


Supplement residence hall for 75 women 
















39 


Equipment for library building 
















40 


Acquisition of land adjacent to highway 
















41 


Supplement library buildirg 
















42 


Purchase of additional land 
















43 


Acquisition of land and improvements . 
















44 


Plans and specifications for women's 


































45 


General Construction Loan oi 1956: 
















46 


Electrical distribution 




$25,000 


18,430 


6,570 








47 


Design, plans and specifications for 


















building library 




5,500 


409 


5,091 








48 


Construction of dining hall and student 


































49 


Equipment dining hall and student acti- 


































50 


Design, plans and specifications for 


















laboratory school building 
















51 


Electrical distribution . 
















52 


Reniodeliiig women's residence hall 
















53 


Equipment for women's residence hall 
















KA 


Suf)plenient for library building 
















55 


\\ onicn s residence hall for 150 students 
















56 


E()uii)ment for women's residence hall 


































57 


Land accjuisition 
















58 


Site improvements, drainage and park- 


















ing area 
















59 


Dr-sign, i)lans, and specifications for a 














i 




laboratory school building 












$7,666 


1 


60 


Design, jjlans, and H|)ecifications 












$3, 


61 


(jcncral Construction Loan of 19.57: 
















62 


Construction of i)arking facilities drain- 
























1,032 


t( 1,032) 








63 


Remodel old librar.v